Ocean City Police Roll Out Segway Patrols

first_imgOcean City Police patrol downtown Asbury Avenue on one of two new Segways on Friday morning, Aug. 22.Pedestrians in downtown Ocean City, on the boardwalk and on the shared-use path of the Route 52 causeway may notice a different sort of police patrol these days.The Ocean City Police Department acquired two Segways about two weeks ago, and officers are now training on the two-wheeled, electric vehicles.With a maximum speed of 12 mph, the Segways allow officers to cover more ground than they can on foot patrols. But the highly maneuverable vehicles can operate in places where patrol cars cannot.The Segways are a conversation piece and officers on patrols in the community are easily approachable, Ocean City Police Capt. Steve Ang said.He said many cities have used the vehicles successfully, and the department sees them as an ideal tool to create a presence on the increasingly popular pedestrian/bicycle path on the causeway.The Segway patrols will continue year-round, weather permitting, he said.last_img read more

Worthy tribute to a baking industry lady

first_imgYOUR readers should share the wonderful tribute to Jean Grieves, who was invested as a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Bakers on April 4. This is the culmination of an outstanding career in our industry.It is fitting to acknowledge the immense contribution Jean has made towards the baking industry – for example when, as head of department at Tameside College, she brought a level of success and prominence to the college far beyond its provincial roots.After retiring from Tameside, Jean became chairman of the Programme Committee of the British Society of Baking (BSB) for nearly 10 years, retiring after the successful 50th anniversary conference, held in conjunction with the Food & Bake show in Birmingham last month.She received an eloquent tribute from Hugh Weeks at the 50th anniversary dinner, held to celebrate the event. Both this and the honour she received reflect her unique combination of exceptional qualities – a creativity and passion for our craft with a remarkable organisational ability.Those of us who know her personally will have also been charmed by her warmth and unfailing courtesy. The baking industry – and the BSB in particular – has been immensely enriched by her talents.David Roberts, chairman, Frank Roberts & Sonslast_img read more

News story: Changes to how we value some non-domestic properties with more than one occupier in England

first_img For current valuations, use the check and challenge process and follow the guidance to notify us that the check is related to the ‘Mazars’ case. For valuations that were split between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2017 inclusive, use our revised 2010 appeal form. You can do this from 17 December 2018 to 31 December 2019. We have revised how we value properties in England where occupiers use two or more separated spaces within a building. We can now value separate but adjoining areas (occupied by one individual or company) as a single property when it is appropriate.Ratepayers can ask us to reconsider when we have previously split a property into more than one. Until we have reviewed the decision, you should continue to pay any additional business rates liability to your council. We will automatically let the council know about any changes to the valuations we make.The decision in the Supreme Court case ‘Mazars vs Woolway’ meant we were legally obliged to treat different areas of the same building (which are accessed through communal areas) as separate premises for business rates purposes. The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced, in the Autumn Budget 2017, his commitment to alter the rating law in England to enable us to treat these as a single property when appropriate. This legislation came into effect on 1 November 2018. The regulations that allow us to amend the 2010 list came into effect on 17 December 2018.We have updated the Rating Manual section 3 part 1, section 2 part 5 and section 7 part 2 to reflect this change in legislation.The previous guidance on how we value some non-domestic properties with more than one occupier still applies in Wales.last_img read more

Sheperd Doeleman awarded National Academy of Sciences Henry Draper Medal

first_img Read Full Story Sheperd (Shep) Doeleman, an astrophysicist at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, has been named the recipient of the National Academy of Sciences’ 2021 Henry Draper Medal. As founding director of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), Doeleman is widely known for his pivotal role in capturing the first image of a supermassive black hole in 2019.This year’s Henry Draper Medal recognizes Doeleman’s vision and decades-long leadership in developing the instruments and global telescope arrays necessary to produce the world’s first black hole image.“It’s an honor and quite humbling to receive the medal. To bring a black hole into focus has been the central theme of my career, and to capture the image was really a dream fulfilled,” Doeleman says. “At the same time, the EHT could not have achieved its goals without the exceptionally hard work and dedication of the entire collaboration. It has been an absolute privilege and joy to work with teams at MIT, the CfA, and across the U.S. and world on this grand scientific adventure. When we saw the telltale ‘shadow,’ a ring of light bent in the immense gravity of black hole, we were all speechless.”Awarded every four years, the Henry Draper Medal is presented with a $25,000 cash prize. Doeleman will share the award with Heino Falcke of Radboud University.“There is no more spectacular scientific result than the iconic image of the supermassive black hole in the center of galaxy M87,” said Charles Alcock, director of the Center for Astrophysics. “I’d like to extend my sincere congratulations to both Doeleman and Falcke for their greatly deserved recognition with the Henry Draper Medal.”Spearheaded by Doeleman, the EHT project started as a small group of just 10 to 20 researchers in the 2000s. The hard work paid off in 2008 when Doeleman and his team used their new technology to measure the size of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Four years later, the team glimpsed a spinning black hole that powers a cosmic jet of material erupting from the heart of galaxy M87. The success confirmed that visualizing a black hole was both technically and scientifically possible, launching Doeleman on a voyage to capture the first image of one.By 2017, the EHT had exploded into a massive border-hopping team of more than 300 people, each working at various facilities to build and synchronize a global array of radio dishes that formed a virtual, Earth-sized telescope. The final array was composed of eight observatories, including locations in Hawaii, Chile, Mexico, Arizona, the South Pole and Spain.“No one knew if the black hole shadow would be observable,” said France Cordova, physicist and 14th director of the National Science Foundation. “It took belief and courage on Shep’s part to persist with this project and to aggregate a diverse and passionate team, all in the face of funding challenges and doubts on the part of some about whether the objectives could be accomplished.”In April 2019, however, Doeleman’s vision finally became reality when his team unveiled the first direct, visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow. The image made the front page of hundreds of newspapers around the world and led to some of the world’s most respected scientific awards, including the 2020 Breakthrough Prize in fundamental physics; the American Astronomical Society’s 2020 Bruno Rossi Prize; the NSF’s 2019 Diamond Achievement Award; and now, the Henry Draper Medal.Doeleman and Falcke will be formally presented with the award at the annual meeting of the National Academy of Sciences in April 2021.“Many people made important contributions to the Event Horizon Telescope,” Cordova said. “At the same time, we should recognize the herculean efforts of the pioneer who took risks, both in career and in intellectual focus, to champion and launch a new, extremely technically challenging approach in observational astronomy — with a result that simply astounded the world.”last_img read more

Students bring Christmas cheer to Robinson Center

first_imgHoliday cheer filled the air with cookie decorating, holiday music, snacks and Santa visits at Saturday’s fourth annual Winter Wonderland at the Robinson Center. The Community Outreach event, sponsored by Student Activities Board (SAB), was held for students at South Bend community schools and the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) children of Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, SAB vice president Alli Gerths said. Gerths said over 1,500 flyers were printed to advertise the event and 300 families from ECDC were invited,. “Winter Wonderland is primarily for underprivileged students so it’s really important that children have a chance to spend Christmas with their families and big holidays that might not have the opportunity to do so otherwise,” Gerths said. She said SAB recognizes that Christianity isn’t the only religion celebrated in South Bend. “We don’t want to just exclude it to [only] Christmas although there is a lot of Christmas stuff going on,” Gerths said. “We want all the holidays to be celebrated, that’s why we call it winter wonderland.” In addition to the visiting Santa, children had access to a variety of crafts such as make your own reindeer and coloring pages, Gerths said. “We want to make it a warm welcoming place for kids to be able to decorate their houses with, we assume they take those crafts home and actually use them to decorate their house because that’s apart of the Christmas spirit,” Gerths said. She said Santa was an especially big hit at the event for kids of all backgrounds. “Their excitement about Santa is unreal. We have kids here from every different nationality and kids from oversee,” Gerths said. “Santa goes across worlds so it’s really cool to see them get excited about it, just as we are excited about it in the United States.”SAB values the importance of giving back to the South Bend community through outreach events like Winter Wonderland, Gerths said. “I know sometimes there’s a little bit of riff between community members and the college students,” she said. “We want to allow the kids to make really good memories here at Saint Mary’s and make it a positive place for the community,”   Contact Alex Winegar at [email protected]last_img read more

City of Jamestown Officials Release Data From Police Reform Survey

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Pixabay Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – City of Jamestown officials have released preliminary data from a survey asking residents for input on law enforcement and its role in the community as part of the New York State Police Reform.The survey was presented to 480 people, ranging from home owners to business owners. Nearly 300 people responded to a question asking them for their thoughts on what the Jamestown Police Department’s role is. Their thoughts varied from protecting the community to not having a definitive answer.The respondents were asked to pick up to ten services listed that they believe are most beneficial. Investigating crimes again and performing narcotics investigations were the top two picked, according to the data.The survey also asked people for their thoughts on how Jamestown Police can best improve policing and build better relationships. Those who took the survey were allowed to pick up to three options. Performing community outreach and establish and build relationships with schools and youth were the top two options selected. Members of the Jamestown City Council Public Safety Committee are expected to review the data, according to the agenda for the Committee’s Thursday meeting. In addition, the agenda says that the committee will create stakeholder groups and discuss the next steps that the legislative body will take.The meeting will not be open to the public, but the stream can be found on the City’s official website.The full survey can be found here:Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infolast_img read more

UVM College of Medicine names John Lunde, MD, Buttles Professor of Pathology

first_imgEdwin Bovill, M.D., professor and chair of pathology, has announced that John Lunde, M.D., associate professor of pathology and medicine, has been named the recipient of the Buttles Professorship in Pathology for 2009-2014. Established in 1984 to honor the late Ernest Hiram Buttles, M.D.’08, who served as chair of pathology and bacteriology from 1921 to 1946, the professorship recognizes a pathology faculty member for their commitment to and excellence in the teaching of pathology.Born in 1880 and raised in Brandon, Vt., Dr. Buttles received an undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont in 1901 and graduated second in the College of Medicine’s Class of 1908. According to Roy Korson, M.D., professor of pathology emeritus, Buttles was “best remembered as a teacher and model for clear thinking. His opinions were respected in the classroom as well as in his pathology practice.”Like Buttles, Lunde, who joined the UVM faculty in 1987, received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from UVM. Medical students have recognized him for his teaching excellence several times over the years. In 2007, the Class of 2009 presented Lunde with The Foundations Teaching Award, which recognizes clarity of lectures and overall outstanding teaching ability. He was also named Basic Science Teacher of the Year by the Class of 2000. Other awards he has received include the Golden Apple Award for best teacher with limited contact hours from the Classes of 1998 and 2000, as well as the Silver Stethoscope Award from the Class of 2007, given to teachers with few lecture hours, but who have made a substantial contribution to students’ education.Source: UVMlast_img read more

Vendor thought H2N2 virus was safe, officials say

first_img In a separate teleconference, Dr. Julie Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said the test kits containing the virus were sent out beginning last September. “We want to reassure the public that we have no evidence of any health threat to anyone in the community as a result of this” and no evidence of illness in lab workers, she said. “We have very good surveillance for influenza in the United States and we’ve not observed any unusual patterns of influenza this year. . . . If an unusual influenza virus had emerged, we’d certainly know about it by now.” Meridian Bioscience of Cincinnati sent samples of influenza A(H2N2) to thousands of laboratories, mostly in the United States, in kits used by the labs to test their ability to identify viruses. The test kits were sent on behalf of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and three other professional organizations. Gerberding explained that for accreditation, labs generally need only to show they can determine if a virus is influenza and whether it’s type A or B. “That’s why we didn’t learn about this earlier,” she said. The CAP instructed Meridian to include an influenza A virus in its test kits but did not specify the type beyond that, according to Schwartz. Henceforward the college plans to give more specific instructions, he said. Apr 13, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The company that sent samples of the influenza virus that caused the 1957 flu pandemic to thousands of laboratories knew the identity of the virus but apparently assumed it wasn’t hazardous because of its current safety classification, officials said today. But Schwartz and federal health officials said today the virus poses very little risk to lab workers and the public. Gerberding said it wasn’t exactly clear why Meridian picked the H2N2 virus, but commented, “It was probably a situation where the advantages of using a strain that grows well and can be easily manipulated in the lab were the driving force.” Before the problem came to light, the CDC had made a recommendation that the H2N2 virus be reclassified as a BSL-3 agent, Gerberding said. She promised to speed up the reclassification. The CDC determines the classifications in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health. In a teleconference this afternoon, CAP spokesman Dr. Jared Schwartz said Meridian knew what the virus was but believed it was safe. In selecting it, the company had determined that the virus was classified as a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) agent, which meant it could legally be used in the kits, he said. Earlier reports suggested that the virus might have been mislabeled. The situation was discovered in March by Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Man. Schwartz and Gerberding said the H2N2 virus used in the kits was a reference strain, meaning it had been used in labs as a quality-control specimen for years. Gerberding said reference strains often become less virulent over time. “It’s possible that this strain of virus poses a very very low risk of transmission efficiency in the public,” she said. “But we have to err on the side of caution.” The CDC notified the CAP of the situation Apr 8 and asked the organization to inform the labs and tell them to destroy the virus samples, Schwartz said. “We’ve asked them [the labs] to sign a piece of paper attesting that they’ve destroyed the virus. We’ve received over 1,500 of them back already,” he said. He later added, “We don’t know what the decision process was. It appears to have been an error in judgment in sending out an organism that had not been seen in the United States or other countries in many, many years.” “We now know that they knew it was an H2N2 virus; had the college known that, we would not have allowed them to send out an H2N2, even though it’s classified as biosafety level 2,” Schwartz said. In BSL-3 labs, agents are handled with equipment designed to prevent any airborne contamination and resulting respiratory exposure, Gerberding said. Level 2 precautions are less stringent, but they can also protect workers from respiratory exposure when they are followed properly, she added.last_img read more

US top court in landmark ruling to protect LGBT workers

first_imgThe group uses the longer version of the acronym, in which the Q stands for “questioning” — as in still exploring one’s sexuality — or “queer.””The court has caught up to the majority of our country, which already knows that discriminating against LGBTQ people is both unfair and against the law,” he said in a statement. Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee for president, hailed the decision as “a momentous step forward for our country.” “Before today, in more than half of states, LGBTQ+ people could get married one day and be fired from their job the next day under state law, simply because of who they are or who they love,” said Biden, who was vice president when the court made its historic ruling in favor of same sex marriage in 2015.Rights activists had feared that Trump’s appointment of two new conservative judges to the top court could hinder further wins for their cause.Yet it was one of them, Neil Gorsuch, who wrote the majority decision, joining with the court’s four progressive-leaning judges and Chief Justice John Roberts.”An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex. Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids,” Gorsuch wrote.”Those who adopted the Civil Rights Act might not have anticipated their work would lead to this particular result,” Gorsuch said. “But the limits of the drafters’ imagination supply no reason to ignore the law’s demands.” Trump’s administration had effectively thrown in its lot with employers, but the president later Monday called the ruling “very powerful”.”They ruled and we live with their decision,” he said.Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights activists, as well as Democratic politicians and several major businesses, had been demanding that the court spell out that the community was protected by the law. “This is a huge victory for LGBTQ equality,” said James Esseks, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s LGBTQ & HIV Project.  The US Supreme Court delivered a landmark victory for the gay and transgender communities Monday when it ruled that employers cannot discriminate against workers because of their sexual orientation.In a blow to the administration of President Donald Trump, the court ruled by six votes to three that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlaws discrimination against employees because of a person’s sex, also covers sexual orientation and transgender status.”Today we must decide whether someone can be fired simply for being homosexual or transgender,” the court said. “The answer is clear.” Topics : ‘Fired for coming out’ Solicitor General Noel Francisco, representing the government’s position before the court, argued that “sex refers to whether you were born woman or man, not your sexual orientation or gender identity.” He said it was the job of Congress to update the law, not the justice system.The Alliance Defending Freedom, a Christian religious freedom group, said the court’s decision was “truly troubling” and encroached on the religious beliefs of employers.Donna Stephens, the wife of transgender plaintiff Aimee Stephens who died last month, hailed her late partner’s struggle for justice after being sacked by a Detroit funeral parlor when she came out.”For the last seven years of Aimee’s life, she rose as a leader who fought against discrimination against transgender people,” Stephens said. “I am grateful for this victory to honor the legacy of Aimee, and to ensure people are treated fairly regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity,” she said in a statement.Among Democratic leaders hailing the ruling was Pete Buttigieg, the former Navy officer and mayor who became the first openly gay person to run for the Democratic presidential nomination. “It was only 11 years ago this summer that I took an oath and accepted a job that I would have lost, if my chain of command learned that I was gay. Firing us wasn’t just permitted — it was policy,” he said.Pop superstar Taylor Swift also lauded the decision, tweeting, “We still have a long way to go to reach equality, but this is a beautiful step forward.”last_img read more

Queenslander comes with a Roman-style spa

first_imgA Spring Hill home is offering buyers a chance to own a 689sqm property located just two kilometres from Brisbane’s CBD.Built in 1912, the ‘Eaton house’ is a recently restored property that offers a taste of ancient Rome combined with distinctive Queenslander-style architecture.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:04Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:04 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels360p360p240p240pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenA part of Ancient Rome in Brisbane02:05Wow: Is this the world’s most expensive shed?The five-bedroom, three-bathroom home comes equipped with a kitchen with modern appliances and alfresco dining spaces on the balcony.It is also bound by four streets, meaning the house is the only one on the block.Live on your very own block. A recent update has completely transformed the home with touches of style reminiscent of a Roman spa.The granite luxury bath comes complete with pillars and carved stone lions spouting water.Signature chandeliers and ornate ceilings add further to the theme which can be seen throughout the house.An ancient Roman-inspired spa. McGrath New Farm Sales Agent Sherrie Storer says the location and proximity to schools will draw families to its beauty.“Lots of people are interested in this area as it’s so close to prestigious schools,” she tells The Courier Mail.“It would suit families with kids going to these schools who are sick and tired of maintenance.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours agoA fully-equipped modern kitchen with a view.“They will have the gardens of Roma St Parklands instead and with no travelling, they’ll also have plenty of free time.”In 2015, Malcolm McBratney restored the home.  It had been used as a block of flats by the previous owners.The home’s heritage features have been restored.After buying the home in 2005, McBratney worked alongside architects Andrew Watson and Ivan McDonald to update it, while conserving its Queenslander charm.The property is located close to nearby schools and the Brisbane CBD.The house will go under the hammer on the 30th of April at 4pm.last_img read more