Ravi Shastri has to win big tournaments to justify appointment: Sourav Ganguly

first_imgRavi Shastri has to win big tournaments to justify appointment: Sourav GangulyFormer India captain Sourav Ganguly said Ravi Shastri, who has been retained as India team head coach, would have to guide the team to wins in big tournaments and knockout games to prove his reappointment.advertisement Rasesh Mandani MumbaiAugust 23, 2019UPDATED: August 23, 2019 23:10 IST Ravi Shastri was re-appointed as India head coach. (Getty Images)HIGHLIGHTSRavi Shastri has been reappointed as India coach until 2021Sourav Ganguly said Shastri should guide the Indian team to wins in big tournamentIndia were knocked out of the World Cup 2019 in the semi-finalsBy reposing faith in Ravi Shastri and giving him the support staff of his choice, the decision makers in Board of Cricket for Cricket in India (BCCI) have made it clear they are looking at India’s 2019 World Cup semi final finish in a positive light.The historic Test series win in Australia was India’s biggest achievement under Shastri-Kohli combine but does that give the complete picture? Ask Sourav Ganguly if India’s unbeaten run in lead up to World Cup knockouts is creditable or should the semi final exit be seen as an underachievement?”The team was capable and it still is but you have to start winning big games,” Sourav Ganguly told India Today on sidelines of My11Circle’ a fantasy gaming platform promotions.”The team has no dearth of talent. A team that has Virat [Kohli], Rohit Sharma, Hardik Pandya, Kuldeep Yadav, Rishabh Pant and Shikhar Dhawan is not short on talent. But it’s also true that we lost the semi finals in 2015 World Cup, in the 2016 T20 World Cup and now in 2019 World Cup. They will have to find a way to win knockout games. That is the puzzle they need to solve. They need some luck, take some risks and find a way,” Ganguly said.Ganguly was part of the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) that picked Anil Kumble ahead of Ravi Shastri as coach in 2016 for a year until the breakdown in relations with Virat Kohli forced the legendary leg-spinner out. Ganguly was reportedly not keen on Shastri again, being a member of CAC in 2017 when Virender Sehwag too had applied. On that occasion, Shastri bagged the job.advertisementHowever, Ganguly said Shastri is the right choice this time around among the applicants. Shastri pipped the likes of Mike Hesson, Tom Moody, Lalchand Rajput and Robin Singh after a Kapil Dev-led Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) conducted interviews for the role of Team India head coach earlier this month.”Ravi is the right choice. They (Kapil Dev-led CAC) didn’t have too many choices as not many had applied,” Ganguly added.However, Sourav Ganguly maintained that the head coach has the responsibility to help India win big tournaments in the 2-year stint.”Ravi has been doing this for five years (except one year of Anil Kumble) and now been given this responsibility for two more years. So I don’t think anyone else in history has got such a long time with the team. He is the right choice but he now has to justify. He has two T20 World Cups ahead and in such big tournaments, India needs to find ways to win them,” Ganguly said.Also Read | Selection process was tough, says Ravi Shastri after bagging another term as India coachAlso Read | CAC did not consult Virat Kohli before reappointing Ravi Shastri, says Kapil DevFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnita Jat Tags :Follow India head coachFollow Ravi Shastri Nextlast_img read more

Wild salmon stocks hit lowest level on record after disastrous season on

Salmon catches on Scotland’s rivers fell to their lowest level since records began last year, sparking calls for the preservation of the species to become a national priority.Fisheries Management Scotland said official figures to be released by the Scottish Government on Wednesday would confirm that Atlantic salmon are at a “crisis point”.Rod and line catches are believed to have been lower than since records began in 1952, after a disastrous year on famous rivers, including the Tay, the Tweed and the Spey.Alan Wells, chief executive of FMS, which represents the country’s district salmon fishery boards, said: “Figures for 2018, taken together with those of recent years, confirm this iconic species is now approaching crisis point.”Some of the factors impacting on wild salmon stocks may be beyond human control.”But Scotland’s Government and regulatory authorities now have a historic opportunity to do everything in their power to safeguard the species in those areas where they can make a difference.” Anglers gathered at the start of a new season on the Tay this year more in hope than expectationCredit:Jeff Mitchell/Getty He added: “Salmon conservation must become a national priority in what is the International Year of the Salmon.”We are calling on all regulatory authorities urgently to place a renewed emphasis on the crucial importance of salmon conservation. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. salmon fishing Andrew Graham-Stewart, of Salmon and Trout Conservation Scotland, said ministers needed to act now to protect salmon and sea trout from the impacts of salmon farming. “There are many examples where positive interventions have already helped, but more must be done.”Mr Wells said ministers and agencies needed to co-ordinate efforts to protect salmon in a way that was currently not happening.In 2017, the total rod catch was put at 49,444 fish, a drop of 20 per cent on the five-year average and the fourth lowest figure on record. Nine out of 10 fish were returned in a bid to help stocks.According to the Atlantic Salmon Trust, wild salmon and sea trout numbers are being “decimated” on their annual migration from Scottish rivers to the waters of Greenland and the Norwegian Sea.For every 100 salmon that leave rivers for the sea, less than five return, marking a decline of nearly 70 per cent in salmon numbers in just 25 years.The trust has launched a project to track young salmon (smolts) going to sea for the first time in bid to learn what happens to them on the journey.Causes for the drop in numbers are thought to include global warming affecting the feeding grounds in the North Atlantic and over fishing at sea. In Scotland’s west coast rivers, the drop in numbers has also been blamed large concentrations of parasitic sea lice in coastal salmon farms. read more