Centre asks AAP govt to review its decision to not start work

first_imgNew Delhi: The Centre has asked the Delhi government to review its decision to not start work on Metro Phase-4 project till the Union Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs revises its approval for the same, sources said Wednesday.The AAP government had in April directed the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) not to start the work on Phase-4 project till the ministry revises its approval in tune with the AAP dispensation’s assent, a source said. Housing and Urban Affairs Secretary Durga Shanker Mishra has written to Delhi Chief Secretary Vijay Kumar Dev, asking him to review the decision of the GNCTD for stopping the work of Phase-IV and lift this embargo at the earliest in public interest, the source said. The Union cabinet had in March approved three of six corridors of the Metro Phase-4 approved by the AAP dispensation, sidelining the conditions imposed by the Delhi government while giving its nod to all six corridors. The three corridors approved by the Union Cabinet are Mukundpur-Maujpur (12.54 km), Janakpuri West-R K Ashram (28.92 km) and Tughlakabad-Aerocity (20.20 km). The other three corridors of phase-4 which have not been approved by the Centre are Rithala-Bawana-Narela, Inderlok-Indraprastha and Lajpat Nagar-Saket G Block. The AAP government had objected it, alleging that the Union government has made some “unilateral changes” in the project, without communicating any reasons. According to the source, Mishra wrote the letter, “Delhi Metro Phase-IV has already been delayed by more than four years for want of approval by GNCTD. The directive of GNCTD to DMRC not to start the work of phase-4 will further jeopardise of expansion of Metro network in the capital and leave it devoid of its benefits apart from adding to cost and time overruns.”last_img read more

Human rights champions from across the world receive top UN prize

He emphasized that “their work, and that of other human rights defenders around the world, is essential for our collective efforts to sustain peace and ensure inclusive sustainable development and respect for human rights for all.”To the human rights defenders carrying out the work on the ground, Mr. Guterres said “I admire their courage and sacrifice,” in a separate set of remarks to the General Assembly, honouring the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, adopted by consensus 20 years ago.Threats to people’s rights have taken on many forms, including “a growth of intolerance and shrinking space for civil society,” he said, but despite the persecution of human rights and defenders, including campaigners, journalists, health workers and lawyers, these individuals remain steadfast in standing for “the principles and values on which our Organization is built.” The 2018 winners are: Rebeca Gyumi of Tanzania, for her work with women and girls. She lead a campaign that prompted the repeal of a Tanzanian law in 2016, which once permitted girls as young as 14 to be married off. All were announced on 25 October, and celebrated at the ceremonial event today.The four winners join a small but notable group who have been recognized since The Prize was established by the General Assembly in 1966, including prominent figures such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Jimmy Carter, and others.The work they do is often dangerous, “yet these courageous individuals and groups remain committed to shining a light on the dark corners of the globe”, Mr. Guterres said at the award ceremony. “Wherever we live, whatever our circumstances or place in society, our race, colour, gender or sexual orientation, language, religion, opinion, nationality or economic status, we are all equal in human rights and dignity,” António Guterres said.As part of the UN’s activities in observance of Human Rights Day, which coincided with the Declaration’s anniversary, champions in the field from across the world, convened at the General Assembly Hall to be recognized for their outstanding contributions.Every five years, The United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights is awarded to organizations and individuals which embody excellent activism in defending human rights. Front-Line Defenders, an Irish organization which works on the protection of human rights defenders.  Asma Jahangir of Pakistan, a human rights lawyer – whose daughter, Munizae, received the award on her behalf. Mrs. Jahangir, who passed away in February of this year, fought against religious extremism and for the rights of oppressed minorities. Joênia Wapixana (known also as Joenia Batista de Carvalho) of Brazil, who advocates on behalf of indigenous communities. read more