Obesity roots may start before kindergarten

first_img Read Full Story A new report suggests that children who are overweight or obese by the time they enter kindergarten have a high likelihood of staying that way as they grow older. Looking at more than 7,700 children over a nine-year-period, the Emory University study found that children who started kindergarten overweight had about four times the risk of becoming obese by eighth grade as their normal-weight peers.In an editorial accompanying the study in the New England Journal of Medicine, co-author Steven Gortmaker, director of the Harvard School of Public Health Prevention Research Center (HPRC) and professor of the practice of health sociology at the School, said that the findings point to the importance of instituting “wide-reaching, cost-effective policy and programmatic changes aimed at improving nutrition and physical activity among broad populations of children if we are to reduce early childhood weight gain and the risk of incident obesity throughout childhood.”On the bright side, Gortmaker told the New York Times, a number of studies have shown that it is possible to stop or reverse excess weight gain in children. And young children can move from overweight to normal weight by losing just a few pounds, whereas for adults to do so could mean having to lose a significant amount of weight—20 to 30 pounds or even 40 to 50 pounds, according to Gortmaker.last_img read more

June 1, 2003 News and Notes

first_imgJune 1, 2003 News and Notes Jeffrey A. Grebe, of Williams, Parker, Harrison, Dietz & Getzen, Sarasota, presented at the Knowledge Network Fund Assembly 2003 on the topic of AS IS and Other Related Disclaimers. Frank S. Moseley, of Davis Polk & Wardwell, and Jose de Lasa of Abbott Laboratories, are recipients of the 2003 Exemplar Awards, presented by the National Legal Aid & Defender Association. G. Mark Shalloway, of Shalloway & Shalloway, P.A., West Palm Beach, presented Why Every Senior Needs to Consult an Elder Law Attorney, at the third annual Interdisciplinary Gerontology Conference, hosted by Florida Atlantic University. Lloyd Monroe, of Coppins & Monroe, P.A., Tallahassee, has been named chair of the labor/employment committee of the Florida Defense Lawyer Association. Bruce D. Lamb, of Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., made three presentations to health care professionals in May. He spoke at the Professional Association of Health Care Office Managers annual meeting in New Port Richey, about Practitioner Regulation and Confidentiality of Medical Records. He also presented Legal Issues in the Transportation of Children at the All Children’s Hospital Neonatal/Pediatric Transport conference in Clearwater, and was part of a three attorney panel making a presentation on Trying Your Case Before DOAH and the Uniform Rules at the Florida Bar’s Nuts and Bolts of Administrative Law Practice seminar in Tallahassee. Richard Milstein, of Akerman Senterfitt, has been awarded The Professional Advisor of the Year Award by Leave a Legacy, a program of the Planned Giving Council of Miami-Dade County. Suzanne Barto Hill, of Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, P.A., was named a member of the board of directors at the Downtown Orlando YMCA. Carlos J. Deupi, of Akerman Senterfitt, was a faculty speaker in Miami at a conference titled Selling Your Business for the Most Profit: How.. . When.. . and Why, co-sponsored by the Geneva Companies Investment Bank and Clemson University. He spoke about structuring, negotiating and closing merger acquisition transactions. Mark D. Hildreth, a shareholder with Abel Band, conducted a presentation on the topic of Bankruptcy and the Secured Creditor, at a National Business Institute seminar in Tampa. William Shepherd, of Richman Greer Weil Brumbaugh Mirabito & Christensen, P.A., was a featured speaker at the annual meeting of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International in New Orleans. He presented on Business Ethics: Learn It in Class or Learn It in Prison. Dennis G. Kainen, of Weisberg and Kainen, Miami, was honored by the Ronald McDonald House of Miami as one of its “Twelve Good Men” for 2003 for his service to the community. Additionally his article, “When the IRS Comes Knocking,” was published in the American Bar Association’s journal Litigation. Manuel Dobrinsky, a partner of Freidin & Brown, P.A., Miami, has been appointed to the Ad Hoc Committee on Attorney Admissions, Peer Review, and Attorney Grievance for the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Florida. Christine Q. McLeod, a shareholder with Beusse Brownlee Bowdoin & Wolter, P.A., Orlando, presented Top Ten Misconceptions About Patents: What Every Entrepreneur Should Know, as part of the University of Central Florida Technology Incubator Educational Series. Daniella Friedman, of Astigarraga Davis, addressed paralegals, legal assistants, legal secretaries, and other support staff providing information on advanced legal drafting. The seminar, held in Miami, covered topics ranging from Conquering Complex Legal Writing to Drafting Strategies for Specific Motions. Scott Murray, a partner of Ricci Leopold, West Palm Beach, was elected to the board of directors of the Palm Beach County Bar Association. Brett Alan Panter, of Panter, Panter & Sampedro, P.A., Miami, spoke to doctors from the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists on the topic of Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia: The Number One Malpractice Liability Risk in Cardiac Surgery. The program was the annual meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Continuing Medical Education Seminar. Norman Leopold, a partner of Leopold, Korn & Leopold, P.A., has been appointed chair of the board of trustees of Aventura Hospital and Medical Center. David M. Caldevilla, shareholder at de la Parte and Gilbert, P.A., Tampa, was appointed by the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners to serve as hearing officer to preside over administrative hearings concerning water and wastewater franchise matters. He has also been appointed co-chair of Bay Area Legal Services’ 2003 Phonathon Committee. Harvey E. Oyer III, of Gunster Yoakley, West Palm Beach, participated in the Liberty Fund colloquium Environmental Problems, Human Nature, and Liberty. Terry Delahunty, of Foley & Lardner, Orlando, was appointed co-chair for the City of Orlando’s Working Committee on Homelessness. Robert C. Brighton, Jr., and Theresa Van Vliet, partners with Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., participated in a one-day program for accountants and attorneys with clients in the financial services and/or health care industry. The seminar, Counseling Business Clients Regarding Privacy: A Guide for Attorneys and Accountants, was held in Miami. Brighton moderated a panel on The Impact of Privacy Considerations on Financial Institutions and Vliet spoke on Money Laundering and Privacy in the Age of the Internet and International Terrorism. Brighton also was elected to serve on the Small Business Committee of the American Bar Association’s Business Law Section. Mitchell B. Kirschner, a partner with Hodgson Russ, LLP, has been elected chair of the board of Hebrew College South. Mike Eiglarsh, a partner with Robbins, Tunkey, Ross, Amsel, Raben, Waxman & Eiglarsh, P.A., Miami, and Brian Tannen-baum, of Tannenbaum, Planas and Weiss, LLP, presented the third annual What Every Civil Attorney Should Know About Criminal Law seminar, sponsored by the Dade County Bar Young Lawyers Section, Continuing Legal Education Committee. Laurie Stilwell Cohen, of Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., was appointed to fill a vacancy on the Wellington Village Council. J. Bert Grandoff was elected president-elect of the American College of Construction Lawyers at its meeting in Carlsbad, California. Tom Scarritt, president of Scarritt Law Group, Tampa, participated in the American Arbitration Asso-ciation’s Advanced Mediation Skills Seminar to teach lawyers, arbitrators, and mediators about What Trial Lawyers Hate About Mediators. He represented the perspective of the personal injury/commercial lawyer on a panel of trial lawyers addressing the issue in Tampa. Don Fitzgerald, senior vice president and division counsel of OSI Portfolio Services, Inc., in Duluth, Georgia, gave a seminar at the Annual Debt Buyers Conference in Las Vegas. His topic was contractual issues in the purchase and sale of distressed debt portfolios. Peter L. Fitzgerald, professor of law at Stetson University College of Law, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland during the 2003-04 academic year. Michael McAuliffe, of Rosenberg & McAuliffe, PL, West Palm Beach, was elected as a member of the board of directors of the Palm Beach Fellowship of Christians and Jews. Ann Marie Estevez, of Morgan Lewis, Miami, has authored the 2003 edition of Public Accommodations Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, a compliance and litigation manual. Richard Bernstein, of Steel, Hector & Davis, LLP, has been named to the international board of trustees of Tel Aviv University’s Law School. Manuel A. Garcia-Linares, a shareholder with Richman Greer Weil Brumbaugh Mirabito & Christensen, P.A., was elected to the board of directors of Meritas, a worldwide alliance of law firms. Quarles & Brady LLP has been awarded a 2003 Family Friendly Workplace Award from The Naples Alliance for Children. Peter Reinert, a shareholder with Akerman Senterfitt, was elected president of the Historical Society of Central Florida, Inc. Glen J. Torcivia, of the Law Offices of Glen J. Torcivia and Associates, P.A., West Palm Beach, presented Establishing a Health Care Delivery System to the Winter Park Health Foundation. Ernest A. Cox, of Gunster Yoakley, has been named to serve on The Rural Lands Stewardship Council in Florida. Edmund S. Whit-son III, of Carlton Fields, Tampa, has been elected to the Child Abuse Council, a nonprofit agency that provides consultation, education, and direct service programs in the areas of child abuse and neglect. Joseph G. Jarret has been appointed county attorney for Polk County. He also has published Making the Grade in School Risk Management in Public Risk Journal, and Code Enforcement Officer Liability in Public Perspective Magazine. Christopher M. Shulman, of Tampa, spoke at the Mid-Florida Society for Human Resource Managers Membership meeting, where he presented Alternative Dispute Resolution for Human Resources Professionals. Joe Adams and Michael Whitt, of Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., lectured on issues related to fair housing at a forum sponsored by the Lee County Office of Equal Opportunity. Adams spoke on the Housing for Older Persons Act and Whitt spoke on Reasonable Accommodation Issues of the Fair Housing Act of 1988. David W. Singer, of Singer, Farbman & Associates, has been nominated for the Greater Hollywood Chamber of Commerce 2003 Small Business Person of the Year Award. He has also been elected vice president of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce board of directors for 2003. Marlon A. Hill, of delancyhill, P.A., Miami, was appointed by the City of Miami Commission and the board of the Miami Parking Authority, to serve on the board of the city’s off-street parking agency. June 1, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

Dodgers’ trade for Mookie Betts, David Price is finally official

first_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire The Dodgers have one year to make their championship dreams come true before Betts becomes a free agent.With an argument to be made as the second-best player in baseball behind Mike Trout, Betts seems intent on putting his services up for bids next winter, having reportedly swatted away the Boston’s offer of a 10-year, $300 million extension last month with visions of a 12-year, $420 million deal.A year in Los Angeles – “Hollywood lifestyle” and all – could give the Dodgers a leg up on the competition to sign Betts beyond 2020.If Betts helps rid the Dodgers of the championship-drought monkey on their back, though, all of this week’s moves will be worth it. LOS ANGELES — They spent the winter big-game hunting and finally bagged their prey.Gerrit Cole wanted to be a Yankee, the Dodgers said, and not even their $300 million could change his mind. Anthony Rendon wasn’t interested in the “Hollywood lifestyle” that comes with playing in Los Angeles, he said himself. Stephen Strasburg didn’t want to leave Washington. Francisco Lindor would have cost more than money and the Dodgers weren’t willing to part with Gavin Lux and Dustin May to land him.But they did land Mookie Betts. The 2018 American League MVP became a Dodger along with former AL Cy Young award winner David Price – finally – when a complicated tangle of trades were worked out then reconstructed. The deal became official Monday.“We obviously got the superstar they’ve been talking about all winter,” Dodgers right-hander Walker Buehler said on Sirius XM’s MLB Network Radio, caught for a reaction on his way to Arizona for the opening of training camps next week. “Sacrificed a little of our depth for it. But it’s obviously pretty exciting.”center_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season In the original configuration of the trade they hope will finally put them over the top in October, the Dodgers sacrificed surprisingly little – none of their top dozen prospects and only some of their payroll flexibility.But the Red Sox balked after their medical review of hard-throwing right-hander Brusdar Graterol and the Dodgers had to dig deeper into their system to rebuild the deal.Now prospects Jeter Downs (in Baseball America’s Top 100 for 2020) and Connor Wong will go to the Red Sox along with outfielder Alex Verdugo. Kenta Maeda still goes to the Minnesota Twins along with $10 million and minor-league catcher Jair Camargo. But now the Dodgers get to keep Graterol, who has a minor-league history as a starter but could figure into the Dodgers’ bullpen mix immediately. In addition, the Dodgers re-acquired minor-league outfielder Luke Raley (a 2016 draftee they sent to the Twins in the 2018 Brian Dozier trade) and will receive a competitive-balance pick in next year’s draft (the 67th overall).And they will keep outfielder Joc Pederson and right-hander Ross Stripling – at least for now. An ancillary trade that would have sent those two (and their salaries) to the Angels along with minor-league outfielder Andy Pages in exchange for utilityman Luis Rengifo and a prospect was scuttled after the deals with the Red Sox and Twins were reconfigured.Instead, the Dodgers designated for assignment first baseman Tyler White and outfielder Kyle Garlick to make room on the 40-man roster for the trade acquisitions. Without moving Pederson and Stripling (who will make a combined $9.85 million in 2020), the Dodgers’ projected payroll currently exceeds the luxury-tax threshold ($208 million) this year after dipping under the past two seasons.If adding the 2018 AL MVP to an outfield that already includes the 2019 National League MVP results in the team’s first championship in 32 years, it will be a small price to pay – in payroll and prospects.Betts is obviously the difference-maker in this deal. His addition already ends the winter of whining by Dodgers fans who took to social media over the past three months, gnashing their Twitter teeth over the front office’s swings and misses and gathering pitchforks and torches to march on Chavez Ravine.It was the Dodgers’ longest offseason since 2015 in more ways than one. But two months after Manager Dave Roberts’ Winter Meetings prophecy of “probably the most turnover we’ll have from one season to the next,” it has come true.“I think that you’ve got to shuffle the deck sometimes,” he said at a time when the Dodgers’ only acquisition was reliever Blake Treinen.They have done much more now, reloading a 106-win team and responding to the shock of their first-round playoff exit with the biggest gamble of the Andrew Friedman era.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Lakers’ Brandon Ingram misses Clippers game due to shoulder soreness

first_img How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThe Lakers, already using a tighter rotation as they battle depth issues, moved JaVale McGee back into the starting lineup in Ingram’s place. McGee came off the bench in the previous three games.Ingram’s absence creates a considerable hole for the Lakers in the midst of the most brilliant segment of his career. Since the All-Star break, Ingram has averaged 27.8 points (to LeBron James’ 28.5 ppg) while shooting 57 percent from the field. He also averaged the second-most minutes behind James during the previous six games.Stephenson had missed the previous two games after suffering the toe injury last week in a home win over New Orleans. Chandler’s minutes have been limited for the last month with various ailments.WALTON SAYS HE’S IGNORING JOB SECURITY SPECULATIONWith the Lakers’ stumbles out of the All-Star break and their fading playoff hopes, there has been increasing speculation that Walton won’t be back to coach the team next season.Related Articles Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Walton said he handles such reports by ignoring them.“I focus on what’s gonna help our team, what I can do better, where I can put our team in a better place to try to succeed,” he said. “I ask my players to do that, so if I’m asking them to do it, I gotta do the same thing. So I don’t pay attention to that or waste time thinking about it.” LOS ANGELES — The Lakers’ sinking playoff prospects suffered another setback on Monday afternoon, when the team learned Brandon Ingram is struggling with right shoulder soreness.The third-year forward missed Monday’s start against the Clippers – joining teammates Lance Stephenson (toe sprain) and Tyson Chandler (neck stiffness) on the sidelines – after the medical staff became aware of the issue following morning shootaround.Coach Luke Walton said he got a call from team trainer Marco Nunez on his way home from the practice facility. Ingram took the court two hours ahead of tip-off Monday night in an effort to try to warm up, but the Lakers ultimately decided to play it safe.“This is a game that we really could use him,” Walton said. “Knowing Brandon, if he can play, he’ll play. But at the same time, if he can’t do certain things and he’s putting himself in jeopardy of something getting much worse, we gotta have somebody else step up as opposed to him only being out there playing 50 percent.” Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions center_img Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs The latest report comes from The New York Times, which reported that “prevailing assumption in league coaching circles remains that Walton will almost certainly be dismissed after the season.” Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more