Students volunteer at Ted Cruz rally

first_imgJust five days before the Indiana presidential primaries, Ted Cruz paid a visit to South Bend to rally voters in pursuit of a crucial win in the race for the Republican nomination.Junior Dylan Stevenson, who attended the rally for the Texas senator at the Century Center on Thursday, said the place was “buzzing” with excitement and enthusiasm.“You had elderly people there, people with families,” Stevenson, vice president of College Republicans, said. “You had men and women, people of all shapes and sizes. It was a really diverse group. I’m guessing there were several principles that united the crowd, but if you were to see these people wandering around the store, you wouldn’t think they necessarily were to share political beliefs.”Fresh off a series of losses on the East Coast, Cruz seeks to defeat frontrunner Donald Trump in what has been deemed a deciding state primary by analysts. If Trump wins Indiana, he will likely secure the 1,237 votes needed the win the Republican delegate majority.Freshman Isabel Teixeira said Cruz discussed the unusual amount of power and responsibility held by Hoosier voters, as the Indiana primaries are often held too late to have a significant effect on national level.“The fact that Indiana is such a big deal this year shows what a weird election this is and what a divided election it is,” she said.Teixeira and freshman Lizzie Cameron said their biggest reason for attending the rally was to see Carly Fiorina in one of her first public appearances since being named Cruz’s running mate this past Wednesday.“There’s no one I really feel strongly about voting for, so we decided to go check out Cruz to see what he’s like,” Cameron said. “I like Carly a lot, and she talked about how close [she and Cruz] have grown and how he’s a really good, hardworking guy.”Cruz’s speech was catered for an Indiana audience and focused on three main points — jobs and wages, freedom and security, sophomore John Kill said.“At the moment, he was speaking to people in South Bend, but I think his audience at large was the people of Indiana,” he said. “The points he spoke to are the things Indiana conservatives, generally really care about and want to protect.”Junior Pat Crane, president of College Republicans, said Cruz put an emphasis Indiana jobs, particularly manufacturing jobs, which are being outsourced to other countries.“Touching on what really has been Trump’s line this whole time, we really want to bring these jobs back,” he said. “He was laying out an effective strategy for that.”In terms of freedom, Crane said Cruz promoted a return to a “Constitutional outlook” on life. Cruz also touched on religious liberty, a relevant topic in light of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed in 2015, Kill said.Stevenson said the senator looks to increase and strengthen national security in line with typical Republican platforms.“He’s going to rebuild the military so it’s not depleted, so it can take on radical Islam,” he said. “It’s a peace through strength sort of strategy.”Kill said Cruz made a point to differentiate himself as the “true conservative” candidate.“Not only did he say Donald Trump wasn’t a conservative, but he said he was just the masculine version of Hilary Clinton,” Kill said.“I think that was his point — not just to the people in South Bend that were there, but to his general audience in Indiana — that look, you know, the election is coming down to here,” he said. “You’re either going to vote for me, or you’re going to vote for Donald Trump. And a vote for Donald Trump is basically a vote for Hilary Clinton.”Kill plans to intern for the Texas senator this summer in his Houston office. Although he will not be involved in the campaign process, Kill said he will support Cruz in the presidential race.“I resonate with a lot of the things he said. … He’s a good family man, comes from a background that shows the importance of hard work and dedication to your family, to your country, to values and principles that I support,” he said.Stevenson said roughly 25 College Republicans members volunteered at the rally.“The energy was great. People started chanting ‘Ted’ part-way through,” he said. “There was really good energy, just overall a really good event. I don’t know what the Trump event will be like, but it’ll be tough to top that.”Cruz is not the only candidate targeting South Bend — Bernie Sanders will host a rally at Century Center on Sunday, while Trump is set to visit the same location Monday.Crane said he hopes to get a similar Notre Dame crowd for the Trump campaign.“That volunteer work is something we want to keep up, whether or not the nominee is Cruz,” he said. “You know, either way, we really want to support the nominee.”Kill said the University’s political atmosphere is sure to provide a stimulating forum for students as the 2016 election draws nearer.“Being here at Notre Dame, the combination of being Catholic and being millennials, that whole mix of things makes it a very interesting political climate. We’re not a left-leaning school, we’re not a right-leaning school — we’re somewhere in the middle,” he said.Associate News Editor Rachel O’Grady contributed to this story.Tags: 2016 Election, Indiana primary, Ted Cruz, Ted Cruz rallylast_img read more

Tickets Now On Sale For Disenchanted! Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments Disenchanted Tickets are now available for Disenchanted! off-Broadway. The fairy tale musical lampoon will begin performances on November 26 at the Theatre at St. Clement’s, where it will play a nine-week limited engagement. Opening night is set for December 4. The cast of Disenchanted! includes Michelle Knight as Snow White, Becky Gulsvig as Cinderella, Jen Bechter as Sleeping Beauty, Lulu Picart as Hua Mulan/Pocahontas/Princess Badroulbadour, Alison Burns as Belle/The Little Mermaid/Rapunzel and Soara-Joye Ross as The Princess Who Kissed the Frog. The production features scenic design by Gentry Akens, costume design by Vanessa Leuck and lighting design by Graham Kindred Related Shows Featuring a book, music and lyrics by Dennis T. Giacino and directed by Fiely A. Matias, the musical features your typical “princess posse” in a show that’s anything-but-typical. Snow White, Cinderella, Belle and more toss off the tiaras and get real in a not-for-kids musical where fairy tales will never be the same. The show premiered at Orlando’s International Fringe Festival in 2011 and has been licensed nationwide since. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2015last_img read more

Federal High Court Emerges Winner of CJN Games in Kogi

first_imgYekini Jimoh in LokojaThe Federal High Court yesterday emerged the overall winner of the 22nd edition of the Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN) Games in Kogi State.The Federal High Court topped the medals table released yesterday by organisers of the games, National Sports Association for Judiciary (NASAJ) with 19 medals comprising eight gold, six silver and five bronze medals to emerge the overall winners of the week-long competition. The medals chart signed by Technical Director of Games for NASAJ, Abruku Raymond, reveals that the National Industrial Court came second with eight gold, three silver and two bronze medals beating the host, Kogi State Judiciary which had the highest number of 22 medals to the third position.Kogi Judiciary won seven gold, seven silver and nine bronze medals while the Federal Judicial Service Commission finished fourth with six gold, six silver and nine bronze medals.The final football match in the tournament between National Industrial Court and Appeal Court ended 4-3 on penalty shootout in favour of the National Industrial Court.The 90-minute display of soccer artistry could not produce any goals as both teams traded tackles and tried to outsmart each other but met stiff resistance from the defenders.Speaking at the end of the week-long competition, Kogi Commissioner for Youth and Sports, Mr Aromeh Adoji, described the tournament as excellent and commended the organisers for a good job and the contestants for good sportsmanship.Adoji expressed delight that the tournament turned out successful and expressed satisfaction with the performance of the Kogi State Judiciary contingent adding that the its performance in subsequent editions.He said that the state was able to meet most of its expectations from the competition saying that new talents, no doubt, would have been identified just as the competition boosted the economy of the state while it lasted.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Low scoring spree at Men’s County Finals

first_img Somerset and Staffordshire grabbed the early advantage in a low-scoring foursomes session on the first day of the English Men’s County Finals at Trevose, Cornwall.Somerset lead Hampshire 2-1 and Staffordshire are 2.5-0.5 against Northumberland after a series of games which were spattered with birdies and eagles. Downwind shots on a bright and breezy morning were eye-catching, for example on the 5th where players were managing about 350 yards off the tee.Somerset set the scoring tone when England international Josh Hilleard and partner Jamie Clare  covered the first nine holes in four-under par. They were 4up at the turn and went on to win 5/4. Between them the two pairs amassed 10 birdies.The second game was similar, featuring 11 birdies and an eagle before Hampshire’s Billy McKenzie and Tom Robson won 3/1. They were four up with four to play, but Somerset hit back with birdies on 15 and 16. Hampshire, however, found the answer with their own birdie three on 17 to take the point.In the third game Somerset’s Tom Sloman and Thomas Plumb got ahead early on but were pulled back to all square after 10 and briefly dropped behind after Hampshire birdied 15. They immediately struck back, returning to 1up after a winning par on 14 and a birdie on the 338-yard 15th, where their drive finished pin-high. They stayed ahead for the remaining holes.In the other match the top game, between Northumberland’s Phil Ridden and Andy Minnikin and Staffordshire’s Gian-Marco Petrozzi and Lewis Pearce, included three eagles – and a tremendous tussle on the back nine. Northumberland were ahead for most of the game, but Staffordshire’s eagle two on 15 squared matters and the teams shared the point.Staffordshire proved remarkably strong finishers in the next game. Jake Whalley and Tom Hewitt got back to all square with a birdie on 11, moved one ahead with a par on 14, got to 2up when they holed out of a greenside bunker on 15 for an eagle two and claimed their 3/2 win with a birdie two on the 16th.In the last game of the morning, Staffordshire’s Jack Gaunt and Ryan Brooks (pictured above) scorched ahead. After the 10th, which they eagled, they were 6up and six-under par. But Northumberland put up a great fight on the closing holes and, helped by three birdies, reduced the deficit to 2 holes before bowing out on the 17th.Image copyright Leaderboard Photography Tags: competitions, County Finals, Mens Team, Trevose 29 Sep 2017 Low scoring spree at Men’s County Finals last_img read more

75 years on, Little League still swings big bat

first_imgSteve Hauser coaches his grandson, Owen Newcomer, before a Little League game in Williamsport, Pa. , May 28, 2014. He is the son of Dick Hauser who played on one of the original Little League teams in 1939, making him the second and Newcomer the fourth generation to play Little League. (AP Photo/Ralph Wilson)WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. (AP) — Dick Hauser was an accidental Little Leaguer.Sitting on the front porch of his Williamsport home 75 years ago, the 12-year-old was approached by a man who asked, “Can you play ball?” His name was Carl Stotz, and he was starting a youth baseball league that would supply bats, balls and uniforms — unimaginable luxuries in Depression-era Pennsylvania.After watching Hauser shag flies and field grounders, Stotz invited him to join.“When you’re presented the opportunity to swing a real bat instead of a stick, and play with a real ball instead of something round that had tape on it, it was awesome,” Hauser, now 87, reminisced as he watched his great-grandson — a fourth-generation ballplayer — take the field not far from Little League’s birthplace.Little League began with three teams and Stotz’s big dream: to teach boys the fundamentals of baseball along with values like teamwork and sportsmanship.Today it’s a global enterprise with 2.1 million baseball players and a long-running TV contract for its signature event, the 10-day Little League World Series, played each August in front of 40,000 fans at South Williamsport’s Lamade Stadium and watched by millions more on ABC and ESPN.Little League is marking its 75th anniversary with a new PBS documentary, a partnership with Major League Baseball and a website that’s collecting players’ memories and photos.With thousands of local leagues in 50 states and more than 80 countries, Little League’s appeal remains little changed from June 6, 1939, when the eager boys of Lycoming Dairy and Lundy Lumber met in the inaugural game.Oil the glove. Lace the cleats. Play ball.And maybe learn some life lessons.“If the kids have fun playing the game, the Little League field can really be a classroom,” said Stephen Keener, Little League’s president and CEO.A lumber company clerk who doted on his baseball-loving nephews, Stotz saw a need for field dimensions and rules designed especially for younger boys. He promoted his idea relentlessly, and leagues patterned after Little League spread rapidly throughout the U.S., then internationally.Stotz would later split with Little League in a legal dispute over the direction of the program, and he died in 1992. His family has since reconciled with Little League, contributing many artifacts to its museum.“My father’s goal was to see a boy wearing a baseball hat,” said his daughter, Karen Stotz Myers. “He was thrilled so many children had that opportunity.”A progenitor of today’s heavily organized youth sports, Little League has both reflected and shaped the culture.It becomes a reality show each August, its young all-stars turned into mini-celebrities by saturation TV coverage of the World Series — a spectacle lamented by some critics. In the 1950s, it took a stand for civil rights by confronting dozens of whites-only leagues in South Carolina. Twenty years later, it found itself on the other end of a civil rights battle, begrudgingly admitting girls amid a series of lawsuits.Participation has declined about 20 percent from its 1997 peak of 2.6 million, likely a function of competition from other youth sports and activities. But it’ll probably be around as long as kids like 5-year-old Owen Newcomer and his 7-year-old sister, Isabella, pick up a glove.Little League is in their blood — their mother, grandfather and great-grandfather, Dick Hauser, are alumni.“We just enjoyed being around it, and I couldn’t wait for my kids to get that experience,” said their mother, Jen Newcomer, who played Little League softball.Keener, the CEO, said he’s confident Little League will be around another 75 years.“There’s still the allure of being part of a team, of playing a game that’s very special, and doing it with the kids in your community, that I think keeps Little League relevant today.”last_img read more