Positive disruption

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.When Saamon Legoski sees something wrong, he feels compelled to make it right.Last year, for example, while working as a behavioral specialist and staff sergeant for the U.S. Army in Kuwait, he helped several of his peers and soldiers come forward with allegations of sexual violence. A formal investigation substantiated the allegations, he said, and the accused sergeant was discharged from the Army.“I’ve learned to be disruptive in a positive way,” said Legoski.These days, as a student in Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s M.P.H.-45 program, he’s focused on redressing the wrongs that arise when people, because of race, national origin, or income, are treated unfairly with respect to environmental laws and policies. He said it riles him that underprivileged neighborhoods are often the most polluted, that tax credits for electric cars predominantly benefit the wealthy, and that the world’s poorest communities bear the biggest burdens from global warming.Legoski plans to become an environmental justice attorney — one who understands enough science to be an expert litigator in court. “At the end of the day, I don’t want the opposing counsel to fool judges, juries, or me with scientific-sounding nonsense,” he said. “I want to be a one-stop shop for interpreting scientific data in the courtroom.”Saamon Legoski joined the military after high school. He is pictured in Kuwait. Courtesy of Saamon LegoskiOrder from chaosLegoski is clear about his goals these days, but that wasn’t always the case. His childhood was chaotic. He grew up in southern California, where parental disputes sometimes led to living in homeless shelters with his mother and younger siblings. He worked in school cafeterias to pay for his lunches. “I got better in high school, but in the earlier years, the disruption would come with me from the house to the classroom,” he recalled.After high school he decided to join the military “to get away from everything” — and loved it. “It was the first place where I challenged myself and leaders really encouraged me,” he said. “Plus, in the military I found a lot of people who had the experience that I did. Growing up I was usually the poorest kid, the least well-dressed, usually just the ‘least’ among people. But when I got to the Army, I was on pretty equal footing with a lot of people.” He says the Army helped him mature and straighten out his rough edges.During his yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, Legoski saw scores of what he thought were needless deaths, and fellow soldiers suffering post-traumatic stress. The experience cemented his interest in psychology, and also led him to think deeply about how to avoid war. “The Afghanistan war led me to believe that our political leaders weren’t effective at conflict resolution and would keep us in Afghanistan indefinitely,” Legoski said.In 2013 he enrolled at Stanford to study psychology. He chose as his adviser social psychologist Lee Ross, who had done real-life conflict resolution work in Ireland, Israel, and other parts of the world. “I spent a lot of time in and outside of class picking his brain about political and social conflicts and pathways to resolution,” Legoski said.Matters of justiceDuring a Stanford quarter in Washington, D.C., Legoski took a seminar in civil rights law and learned about “disparate impact,” which occurs when laws or rules negatively impact a particular group of people. “It’s up to civil rights lawyers to prove disparate impact through testimony, data, and analysis in the courtroom,” Legoski said. He decided that becoming a lawyer “would be a good career match for my strong sense of justice,” he said.The field of environmental justice caught his attention when he spent a year as an executive fellow in California’s Department of Toxic Substances Control, working on projects to keep consumers and workers safe from the toxic chemicals found in some nail products. The field “had all the civil rights components that I want and I love,” he said.Environmental advocateThanks to support from the Harvard Presidential Scholars Program, Legoski was able to come to Harvard Chan School to get the science background he wanted. In a class last fall on analytical methods and exposure assessment, he and a group of fellow students studied the role of compostable beverage containers in microplastic contamination.Jonathan Buonocore, research scientist at Harvard Chan School, advised Legoski and the other students on their research. “With the issue of plastics, we have been hearing about impacts on sea turtles and pollution on beaches, but Legoski wondered if humans are getting exposed to microplastics through compostable cups,” he said. “He took it upon himself to find a way to address the question.” Previous studies have suggested that microplastics consumption may harm health. The students found significant leaching of microplastics from some of the compostable cups they looked at.While at Harvard Chan, Legoski has done field work at Clean Water Action, an environmental advocacy group. Last fall he spoke on the organization’s behalf to a Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection panel about the health impacts of the Wheelabrator Saugus incinerator, the nation’s oldest. He also spoke at a Massachusetts Department of Transportation board hearing about the need in underserved communities for better public transit service, lower fares, and reduced transportation-related pollution. On campus, he serves as a student ambassador for the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment (C-CHANGE), helping promote collaborations among departments to address environmental issues.“He’s definitely a driven individual and has a good line of sight on how to use both scientific evidence and the legal mechanisms we have to improve public health and, in particular, right environmental justice wrongs,” said Buonocore.“What I love as an environmental justice advocate and future lawyer is that I will be able to tackle civil rights from a perspective that takes many issues into account — environmental issues, housing, transportation, job insecurity, food costs— that are often treated as separate issues by policymakers,” said Legoski. “It’s a field where I’ll be able to channel my passion for helping people and making sure there’s justice.”last_img read more

Trophy assets

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Gold Coast real estate: Titans captain selling home

first_imgEnjoy cooking up a storm in the kitchen. Picture: realestate.com.au Gold Coast Titans captain Ryan James has listed his sprawling Coast home, just days after the NRL season came to an end. Picture: realestate.com.au The pool room. Picture: realestate.com.au He and wife Ana previously told the Gold Coast Bulletin the openness and backyard overlooking the dam od his Mudgeeraba property would be a perfect place to raise little ones.“I grew up in Tweed on five acres of land out in Piggabeen with two older brothers and two dogs so this semi-acreage is a dream,” James told the Bulletin in 2016.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago Enjoy a dip in the pool. Picture: realestate.com.au“This quality combination of home, land and lifestyle is well worth your inspection.”James, who bought his Mudgeeraba house in 2015, has sold two Gold Coast properties over the past two years.No price has been put on the Mudgeeraba property.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59 Gold Coast Titans player Ryan James and wife Ana arrive at the Dally M Awards in Sydney, Wednesday, September 26, 2018. (AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts) Gold Coast Titans captain Ryan James has listed his sprawling Coast home, just days after the NRL season came to an end. Picture: realestate.com.auONE of the Gold Coast Titans’ biggest stars has listed his sprawling home, just days after the NRL season came to an end.Captain Ryan James, who was last month named the club’s player of the year, has decided to part ways with his “acreage lifestyle” in Mudgeeraba. Ryan James of the Titans during the Round 14 NRL match between the Gold Coast Titans and the South Sydney Rabbitohs at CBUS Super Stadium at Robina on the Gold Coast, June 8, 2018. (AAP Image/Dave Hunt) There is plenty of space for the whole family. Picture: realestate.com.au MORE NEWS: Fitness First founder has put his beachfront mansion up for rent for The 27-year-old’s four-bedroom home features two outdoor kitchens, an infinity edge pool, fire pit and pizza oven.“Perfect for the extended family, offering a multitude of options including dual living or teenage retreat, this spacious and contemporary residence offers peace and tranquillity, all just minutes from quality schools, local parks, Robina Town Centre and the M1 Motorway,” the listing states. MORE NEWS: Fashion designer Selling Gold Coast villalast_img read more

Gianluigi Buffon, Chiellini sign one-year deals with Juventus

first_imgTURIN: Juventus goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon and central defender Giorgio Chiellini have signed new one-year contracts to stay with the club until the end of the 2020-21 season, the reigning Italian champions announced on Monday.Buffon, 42, joined Juve from Parma in 2001 and has made over 669 appearances for the club, returning to Turin at the start of the campaign after one season with Paris St Germain. The 2006 World Cup winner has played 13 times in all competitions this season as back-up to Wojciech Szczesny. Centre back Chiellini, 35, entering his 16th year at Juventus, has racked up 509 appearances for the club. Both players are aiming to help Juve win a ninth consecutive league title and their first Champions League trophy since 1996. Meanwhile, Barcelona announced they have reached agreement to sell Brazil midfielder Arthur Melo to Juve in a deal worth 72 million euros ($80.91 million). Agencies Also Watch: Get Set Global: Assamese in UK coping with the Pandemiclast_img read more

CWI suspends last two rounds of Regional 4-day competition, youth tournaments

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC) – Cricket West Indies (CWI) yesterday announced it would suspend the last two rounds of the marquee first class championship, along with an entire suite of youth tournaments for the next 30 days, as it braces for the full impact of the deadly coronavirus across the region.In a statement, CWI said the bold decision was taken on the recommendation of its Medical Advisory Committee, which convened by teleconference on Thursday to discuss the impact of the virus on the domestic schedule.The coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, has already popped up in several Caribbean territories with Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, St Lucia, St Vincent, Antigua and Guyana all reporting cases over the last week.“The health and safety of our players, officials and staff, are of paramount importance to CWI and we have advised the Board of Directors to take proactive policy steps to decrease the growing risk of contamination and spread of the virus,” said CWI’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr Israel Dowlat.The ongoing eighth round of the first class championship is set to wrap up today, with matches being played in Trinidad, Guyana and Antigua.All three nations were set to host upcoming age group tournaments. The Women’s Super50 Cup was scheduled for Guyana from March 27 to April 12, the Under-15s Boys Championship was carded for Antigua April 9-20 while the inaugural Under-19 Girls Championship was set for Trinidad from April 6 to 12.Dr Donovan Bennett, chairman of the Medical Advisory Committee, said the decision to suspend the competitions was aimed at minimising the spread of the virus.“We are acting based on medical best practices as well as in an abundance of caution,” Bennett said.“The ongoing gathering of even small groups of spectators, cricketers and match officials could pose a risk to some persons of contracting the virus and being stranded in quarantine in a non-resident country for a prolonged period.“Clearly this pandemic is still evolving, and we will continue to monitor the situation throughout the Caribbean.”All face-to-face CWI meetings – including a board of directors meeting and an annual general meeting scheduled for Antigua next month, have been suspended.The board said any “urgent matters” would be discussed via teleconference.CWI’s decision follows that of the CARIFTA Games organisers who yesterday cancelled the region’s premier junior track and field which was to be staged in Bermuda over the Easter weekend next month.Nearly 156 000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported worldwide with almost over 5 800 deaths recorded.last_img read more