People on the Move 12011

first_imgElizabeth Tighe was named to the new position of vice president of marketing and business development, lifestyle communities, for Reader’s Digest Association. She will lead a centralized marketing team for Every Day With Rachel Ray, the Taste of Home Media Group, The Family Handyman, freshHOME, the Market Intelligence Group and the Integrated Marketing Team. She previously served as vice president of marketing at Fairchild.Energy Central, an online hub for the energy industry, tapped three former Summit Business Media executives for new roles. Joseph Haddock, formerly director of e-media business development at Summit, joins Energy Central as chief digital officer. Betsy Kominksy, who headed up the Life/Health/Benefits division as vp/group publisher at Summit, will become senior vice president of media at Energy Central. Jennifer La Flam, former publisher of Senior Market Advisor, becomes vice president of sales, marketing and services.Jay Fielden, former editor of Men’s Vogue, takes over as editor-in-chief of Town & Country. He replaces Stephen Drucker.ALM named Kevin Iredell as vice president, marketing. He will manage the corporate marketing, brand team and creative department. Iredell joined ALM in 2006 as director of marketing for national publications and in 2009 was promoted to head of the Legal Intelligence business unit. Kevin Riley was appointed to associate publisher for Climbing and Urban Climber. He served as advertising sales manager for the two magazines since 2007.Dr. Dobb’s named Andrew Binstock executive editor. He most recently was a columnist for SD Times.last_img read more

Feud between Johnny Depp and Amber Heard escalates as he claims new

first_imgThe war of legal suits continues between Johnny Depp and estranged wife Amber Heard as things have taken an ugly turn. Now, the Pirates of the Caribbean actor has submitted a new declaration claiming that his ex-wife used tricks to fool the jury.In a defamation lawsuit, as obtained by E! News, Depp alleges that Amber “painted on bruises” and instead was the one who caused him “serious bodily injury.” Further in his declaration, Depp has claimed that the violent incident occurred when Amber was under the influence of “prescription amphetamines and non-prescription drugs with alcohol.” His claims also state that the abuse took place on multiple occasions and that Heard used a variety of weapons including soda cans and paint cans to attack.The document further adds that Depp suffered from physical as well as emotional abuse. One of the incidents mentioned in the defamation suit claims that Amber and one of her friends allegedly “defecated” in his bed as part of “some sort of a sick prank.” Apparently, this is what pushed him off the edge and he opted to divorce her. “As a result of the years of domestic abuse I had suffered at the hands of Ms. Heard—most recently the April 21 physical attack and defecation on my bed sometime before she and her friends left the next morning—I resolved to divorce Ms. Heard,” Depp explained in his document. Amber Heard and Johnny DeppTwitterThe new allegations by Depp contradicts his previous court filing which actually requested a dismissal of the lawsuit based on the claims made by her against him. The documents submitted by Heard to support her claim were pictures of her sporting bruises, property damage that she blamed on Depp and screenshots of text messages which describe the abuse and incidents faced. In a statement shared by her lawyer, it says, “It is regrettable that it will take a judge to finally end the persistent harassment of Ms. Heard by Mr. Depp, but Ms. Heard will take whatever action is necessary to vindicate the truth.” Amber Heard’s Instagram postInstagramAlthough Amber Heard and Johnny Depp dissolved their vehement marriage back in August 2016, they continue to wash their dirty linen n public. There are constant claims and new allegations made by both of them to make each other look like the horrible person in the relationship. Amber has received a $7 million dollar settlement from the actor.last_img read more

Ceasefires Bridgeford Laments De Sousa Resignation

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, Baltimore AFRO Editor, [email protected] a little more than two months in the chair, Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa resigned this week in the wake of three federal misdemeanor charges of not filing income taxes in 2013, 2014 and 2015.However, it seems abundantly clear to many that there is much more connected to De Sousa’s departure from the Baltimore Police Department (BPD), than taxes.Baltimore AFRO reporter Stephen Janis writes this week:“WBAL-TV reported May 15 that federal prosecutors had issued subpoenas to the city finance department for records related to De Sousa’s work history going back almost a decade. The documents sought pay stubs, travel records, personnel files and internal investigations…There are concerns that the subpoenas coupled with the motions filed by prosecutors stating that De Sousa was under investigation for other federal crimes, is a sign of other charges are forthcoming. Particularly since the prosecutors handling De Sousa’s case are the same duo that brought down the Gun Trace Task Force.”Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)Ultimately, whether the 30 year veteran of the BPD was forced to resign because of taxes, or something far more insidious, the bottom line is De Sousa, the eighth BPD commissioner in 18 years, is out.Erricka Bridgeford, the leader and co-founder of the Baltimore Ceasefire 365, the grassroots anti-violence movement, is not happy about De Sousa’s exit.“I’m disappointed that the commissioner resigned. In relation to your job: I don’t care if you are unorganized in your own finances. It’s not my business if you cheat on your wife. When you show up at work, how well do you do your job? That’s what I care about,” wrote Bridgeford in a Facebook post on May 16.“I want a world where our current system of policing is dismantled and rebuilt, based on “power with” the community. But, in the meantime, we need people in BPD who really do their best, given the effed up system.”Some may disagree with Bridgeford’s assertion that she doesn’t “care if you are unorganized in your own finances.” And they may take issue with her not caring whether or not the police commissioner, or any other public servant, cheats on their spouse. But, I would take issue with anybody who doesn’t believe Baltimore’s criminal justice system and specifically, the Baltimore Police Department is “effed up.” And I think there is consensus that we want our leaders to “do their best.” And Bridgeford believes De Sousa was doing his best confronted with a dire situation within the BPD and our city.“Up close, I saw what Darryl De Sousa was doing. I saw him be more transparent with grassroots leaders than any previous commissioner. I saw him work with grassroots leaders to help keep people from getting killed, in some of Baltimore’s darkest hours in the last month. I saw him care about Baltimore, not just with his words, but with his actions. I saw him be open to feedback. I saw him be responsive to residents and help with things they needed,” Bridgeford added.“Nobody is perfect. If the places I fail in my personal life ever became public information, people would be out here hunting for my head…regardless of how good I am at what I do. I’m not saying I agree with De Sousa’s every strategy…because I disagree with a lot of policing strategies. But, given what the policing system currently is, the man was doing his best. He was someone I trusted in that position.”And I trust Bridgeford’s opinion and her leadership on this and she’s not the only person whose opinion I trust who backs the former commissioner.Baltimore took a big loss this week, now that De Sousa is out of the chair.Sean Yoes is the Baltimore editor of the AFRO and host and executive producer of the AFRO First Edition, which airs Monday and Friday at 5 p.m. on the AFRO’s Facebook page.last_img read more