Much Ado Abouot Nothing

first_imgContinuing the theatrical trend for all things al fresco this term, Creation Theatre Company have returned to Headington Hill Park with the chaotic comedy Much Ado About Nothing. Director Charlotte Conquest has played up Shakespeare’s Mediterranean setting with sizzling flamenco dances and vibrant costumes, making it the perfect play for a balmy summer evening. The most striking aspect of this production is its use of space. The stage is a simple red square but the action is projected on different levels by means of a treehouse nestled in a magnificent oak. The expanse of parkland behind the stage proper is used to full effect to create extra comic gems, supposedly taking place off-stage. This heightens the dramatic irony which lies at the core of Shakespeare’s comedy, as we see characters approaching long before those on stage do. The scenes in which Benedick and Beatrice ‘accidentally’ overhear gossip about their tempestuous relationship make particularly good use of the versatile stage set. The pace is relentless with characters entering from unexpected directions, (and occasionally on bicycles) having performed lightning-fast costume changes. The cast have a rollicking good time evoking a real sense of girlish mischief and laddish japing. The mood becomes briefly more sombre at Hero’s ‘funeral’ with an atmospheric torch-lit procession, but the production really excels at the slapstick consequences of mistaken identity. The watch scenes are, as always, a little tedious and silly but they are redeemed by Tom Peters’ wonderful turn as the arthritic Verges with his cumbersome walking frame. Peters makes use of the same physical gags in his main role as Benedick; rubber-faced and dynamic, he plays up to the audience as a swaggering confirmed bachelor. His only match in the strutting stakes is the razortongued Beatrice, played by Elizabeth Hopley. She sensitively tracks the change in Benedick’s sparring partner from cross-dressing livewire into a more emotional, softer character. Dudley Hinton’s lovelorn Claudio is the archetypal callow youth with puppy dog eyes and a boy bandesque white suit. Julien Ball is also consummately smooth as Don Pedro, from his Godfather-inspired entrance complete with mirror shades, trimmed goatee and medallion, to his swift wooing of Hero for his lovestruck friend Claudio. Conquest’s production is full of light comic touches seasoned with splashes of Sicilian colour. As long as the British weather holds out, there is no better way to round off the Oxford term.ARCHIVE: 6th week TT 2004last_img read more

2013 Long Island Press Power List

first_imgThe process of selecting honorees for the Power List is so highly secretive even the NSA doesn’t know who’s on it until it comes out. Okay, that’s probably not true. The point is we typically play it pretty close to the vest.The Power List issue has particular meaning to the Press staff as it was actually our debut issue in 2003. Although we began publishing bi-weekly as The Island Ear in 2002, the Power List in January of 2003 was our official start in the alternative publishing world. From the beginning we sought to identify the people who impacted life on Long Island and shaped its image. From our first introductory editorial in 2003:“We were looking for more than mere celebrity or financial clout. We wanted those who made the most of their resources, whatever those resources were. We tended to reject those who held big titles but used them to little effect… We insisted on real Long Islanders, not pseudo-Islanders with country homes in the Hamptons.”The original list included lesser-known figures like independent music promoter Christian McKnight and DOT acting director Tom Oelerich, alongside highly visible and prominent leaders such as former Senator Alfonse D’Amato and New York Islanders owner Charles Wang. Topping the list that year (as his son James would in later years) was Cablevision founder Charles Dolan. And even though Robert Moses was deceased for more than two decades, we even put him on the list. (We have since revised this policy. Only the living may appear.)Our strategy hasn’t changed much, and—for better or for worse—neither has many of the names. Therefore, in order to prevent the list from becoming stale with perennial “Power Listers,” we created the Power List Hall of Fame for individuals who made the list five times. It’s like raising a star athlete’s jersey to the rafters. But instead of a jersey, we commission a caricature likeness of this individual that is sometimes flattering and sometimes, well, not so much.Coming into this year, however, we faced a problem. There were so many Power List Hall of Famers continuing to expand his or her influence that it has grown increasingly difficult to exclude them. After many intense negotiations, (i.e. a couple of beers) the Press decided upon a significant rule change. From this point forward Hall of Famers will once again be considered for selection among their peers with the exception of those who are being inducted within the year.It’s important to understand when considering this list as a whole that it is not a wish list but a mirror. Every year we point out that the list is predominantly filled with white men. Once again, 2013 offers no exception.It is, however, interesting to note that the composition of this year’s list might be looked at as somewhat of a bellwether with respect to our economy. There is broad representation of the healthcare field from research and technology to hospitals and advocacy. As usual, there are far too many political people on the list and still more who are likely incredulous that they were not included. But this too is a reflection of Long Island, a place where politics is inseparable from daily life.Lastly, a note on our editorial prerogative. Every year there are a few people who had the power to inspire this newspaper. Take, for example, Andy Stepanian, who embodies activism and speaks truth to power so softly it humbles the most outspoken among us. Or Gerard Depascale and Liam Neville, who took on a giant to shine light in the darkness and clear a path for others to follow. They lost their battle but won our hearts. Theirs are the stories we ache to tell throughout the year and we thank them for allowing us to do so.For all those who are reading this issue and wondering whether or not your name will ever appear on the Power List, a few words to the wise: Those who lobby for inclusion on the list never make it. (We’re petty like that.) Also, substance wins over style.Enjoy the list.Jed MoreyLong Island Press PublisherCLICK THE IMAGE TO VIEW THE 2013 LONG ISLAND PRESS POWER LIST Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Florida opens practice short-handed, Mullen expects opt-outs

first_imgLast Updated: 18th August, 2020 08:23 IST Florida Opens Practice Short-handed, Mullen Expects Opt-outs Mullen declined to provide names, but the Orlando Sentinel and Sports Illustrated reported that four guys — receivers Kadarius Toney, Trevon Grimes and Jacob Copeland and defensive end Zachary Carter — skipped the session FOLLOW US First Published: 18th August, 2020 08:23 IST WATCH US LIVE Written By Associated Press Television News center_img COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Florida coach Dan Mullen had several players miss the team’s opening training camp practice Monday.Mullen declined to provide names, but the Orlando Sentinel and Sports Illustrated reported that four guys — receivers Kadarius Toney, Trevon Grimes and Jacob Copeland and defensive end Zachary Carter — skipped the session.“We had a couple guys not practice today, but we’ll see how that goes moving forward for us,” Mullen said during a Zoom call with reporters. “But, you know, I wouldn’t be surprised if you have guys opt out. I’m going to support them fully. Really wouldn’t be surprised if we had coaches opt out, to be honest with you. Coaches are at such high risk because of the age group that they’re in.“But we’ll figure it out.”It’s unclear if the players’ absences were related to the coronavirus pandemic. Toney and Copeland expressed concerns earlier this month about playing amid a global health crisis.Toney wrote on Twitter that sitting out “might be the better decision.” Copeland responded that Toney might have the right idea and tweeted, “Health over football,” followed by a thumbs-up emoji.Carter, meanwhile, has supported the #WeAreUnited campaign started by Pac-12 players earlier this month. His father, Frank Carter, told Rivals that his son has significant concerns.“First of all, he’s my son and I support him,” Frank Carter told the recruiting website. “He told me he wants to play, but he just doesn’t feel safe right now. We’ve had a couple friends of the family who’ve passed away from the effects of COVID. Now some players in other conferences are having issues with their heart.“I think all of that is kind of alarming to him. There’s really not enough research or data to give him information that can put his mind at ease, so he’s just taking the cautious route.”The elder Carter also told Rivals something he said he hasn’t shared with his son.“I went through it,” he said. “I was having those night sweats and I couldn’t consume enough liquid to keep me from being dehydrated, so I had to get rushed to the hospital because my wife said I was hallucinating. I didn’t tell Zach any of this stuff.”Two hours after Mullen’s news conference, Grimes posted on Twitter, “Don’t believe everything you read.” He did not elaborate.Florida is scheduled to open Sept. 26 at Mississippi, which is entering its first season under coach Lane Kiffin. The next five weeks will be critical in getting to the opener.Two Power Five conferences — the Big Ten and the Pac-12 — already have postponed their football seasons because of coronavirus concerns.The Gators had 21 players test positive for COVID-19 since returning to campus in late May. They’ve had no positives or anyone quarantined because of exposure over the past four weeks.“Statistically speaking off of that, we’re — off of those numbers — you would think the safe place to be is practicing football and doing organized team activities because that’s where our numbers greatly decreased,” Mullen said. “That’s the information we have now. That’s why I feel comfortable.“I can’t tell you what’s going to happen long-term, but our guys have handled everything really well. I think our medical staff, UF people that have helped our medical staff here within the athletic department, have done an amazing job creating a safe environment for our players and the coaches as well.”The Gators will get another challenge this weekend when students start returning to campus.“We’re going to adapt to whatever happens as we continue to move forward,” Mullen said. “I think it’s the team that’s able to adapt best to whatever situation — there’s a lot of moving parts — and the team that’s able to adapt will end up holding up that national championship trophy at the end of the season.”Image credits: AP LIVE TVlast_img read more