Millennials needed at front line of credit union movement

first_imgThe way in which the world accesses money is on the brink of change. By 2030, 2 billion people without a bank account today will store money and make payments on their phones, according to the 2015 Gates Annual Letter. During this shift, millennials (defined as anyone born from approximately 1980–2000) will carry the bulk of responsibility to accelerate the credit union movement. As early adopters, they are the ones evoking the “disruption” in the first place:A Scratch study found that 73% of millennials would be more excited about a new financial service offer from Google, Amazon, Apple, Paypal or Square than from their own bank.Fifty-two percent of millennials rank far above or above average as early adopters of technology.In addition, the world’s 2.5 billion millennials are currently experiencing some of the biggest transitions of their lives. Their financial needs are transitioning as they leave school, change employment or make larger purchases like a car or home. This generation will soon become the future financial services business’ largest source of revenue. For these reasons, millennials need to be at the front line of promoting credit unions’ unique ability to meet their transitional needs.But how can they if they don’t know what credit unions are?This is why World Council began a global networking initiative called weCU2, which connects millennials, technology experts and credit unions under one digital hub. Michael Mori, a millennial research fellow for the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth, recently explained on a weCU2 interview that credit unions are a “natural” place for millennials to bank, but many don’t use them because:1)    They don’t know about credit unions;2)    They don’t understand their social value; and3)    It’s easy to use the same bank account their parents set up for them earlier in life.In other words, once millennials start careers, set up account(s) and become more financially stable, enticing them to switch becomes much, much harder. So, what’s the difference?“None of the big banks have made a public shift from selling credit to empowering human endeavor,” says Scratch Executive Vice President Ross Martin.Credit unions can empower young adults in ways never seen before; but they need to effectively communicate how they are different from banks. Investment in innovation and communicating the credit union difference to millennials must be top priorities. 130SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Sarah Timmins Sarah is a passionate communicator, sociology-driven digital fanatic. She’s a millennial who began her career after graduating from UW – Madison by developing online communication strategies for the TechStars company, … Web: www.woccu.org Detailslast_img read more

Former Lady Charger Standout Named To 2018 Silver Anniversary Team

first_imgCongratulations to former North Decatur Charger standout Roseanne Bohman on being selected to the 2018 Indiana Girls Basketball Silver Anniversary Team.Roseanne was a1993 Indiana All-Star and AP & ICGSA 3rd team all-state… totaled 1,263 career points with 820 rebounds, averaging 18.0 points and 9.4 rebounds her senior season for 18-4 teamthat won first girls basketball sectional championship in school history… Street & Smith’s honorable mention All-American as a junior when she averaged 19.3 points and 9.0 rebounds…four-year letter winner at Notre Dame, starting all 38 games and 3rd leading scorer (9.8 ppg) as senior for their 31-7 1997 NCAA Final Four team… Notre Dame career totals of 120 games played, 708 points and 426 rebounds… received her degree in graphic design and for last 11 years has been production manager of Lloyd’s of Indiana, a supplier of graphic finishing products in Indianapolis… mother of two children, she resides in Indianapolis.2018 Women SAT biosEighteen women have been named to the Indiana Basketball Hall ofFame’s 2018 Silver Anniversary Team, based on outstanding accomplishments as a senior basketball player 25 years ago.The team includes 12 members of the 1993 Indiana All-Star squad, among them Indiana’s Miss Basketball. Six other all-state players are included to comprise the best of Indiana’s high school class of 1993.1993 Indiana All-Stars on this year’s Silver Anniversary Team include Miss Basketball Abby Conklin of Charlestown along with Kokomo teammates Tiffany (Longworth) Boruff, Mistina Oliver and Cari Stover-Richards and Gary West teammates Kasia McClendon-Campbell and Danielle McCulley. The remainder of the Indiana All-Stars honored are Kelli (Kerkhoff) Burton, Rosanne Bohman, Beth (Morgan) Cunningham, Erika Fall, Regan (Seybert) Hoffmayer and Leslie Johnson.The remaining six, named to various all-state teams are: Alana Burns, Alicia Harkins, Andrea Lehr, Jacki (Lung) Negri, Kris (Booker) Rastrelli and Tiffany (Park) Sever.All Women’s Silver Anniversary Team members will be honored at the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame’s 17th Annual Women’s Awards Banquet on Saturday, April 28, 2018.last_img read more