Sheep industry leadership school returns to Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Participants 20 years of age or older who are interested in all aspects of sheep production and marketing have until May 1, to register for the July 10-14, 2016, Howard Wyman Sheep Industry Leadership School being held at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. This intense four-day program will incorporate site tours of exceptional Ohio sheep operations with the Lamb 509 short course taught by Roger High and Dr. Henry Zerby of OSU.In addition to the site tours, participants will spend one full day in the OSU Meat Lab learning about carcass grading, performing hands-on fabrication of carcasses and processing meat products.Interested individuals must complete an application form. Applications will be reviewed and 32 participants will be selected to attend the 2016 school. Though there is no fee to apply, a registration fee of $200 is required if accepted. The National Lamb Feeders Association will provide meals, lodging and tour-related expenses. Participants are responsible for their own travel to and from the school location.Applicants may apply electronically by visiting www.nlfa-sheep.org/leadership.html or an application may be downloaded and returned by mail or fax. Applications must be received by May 1. For more information, call the NLFA office at 503-364-5462 or email [email protected]last_img read more

Buying Tips: Tripods for Video

first_imgDon’t cheap out on your camera support! Investing in a quality tripod and fluid head is a smart decision for the future expansion, performance and safety of your gear. Build quality in a tripod has a huge impact on the final image, for both filmmakers and still photographers.Inexpensive tripods are often shoddily constructed, made from aluminum or a similar, thin metal. This flimsy construction makes the tripod prone to breaking and doesn’t provide strong stabilization. Conversely, investing in a more expensive, but higher quality tripod, will provide a more stable image, a longer product lifespan and additional peace of mind when you go to shoot. Are you in the market for a new tripod? Make the following considerations…Avoid Center ColumnsTripods with height adjustable center columns introduce a lot of vibration and instability to your camera rig. There’s a reason professional quality tripods don’t have center columns: the engineering will not provide enough stability. If you’re looking for adding height, go with a tripod that has longer legs.Avoid Aluminum, Stick With Carbon FiberAluminum tripods are usually much more prone to vibrations than tripods constructed of carbon fiber. Aluminum has a longer dampening time, meaning vibrations are much more prevalent – traveling easily throughout the tripod.Carbon fiber has a much shorter dampening time, containing and minimizing vibrations with every camera movement or bump of the tripod. Although lightweight tripods tend to cost more, they do not necessarily perform better. That being said, many professional tripods are made from carbon fiber, which is considerably lightweight. A tripod with better dampening times will produce a professional looking result with minimal hassle.This video from Gordon Liang illustrates the dampening time of an assortment of tripods.Load CapacityEvery tripod will have a maximum load capacity, ranging from 7-10 lbs for cheaper models and upwards of 50 lbs for higher-end types. This is where a little planning can go along way. Selecting the right tripod for your needs (and future needs) is key to your tripod investment. Factor in the weight of your camera combined with weight from any other equipment that will be rigged onto your tripod. As previously stated, it is best to account for the future when that time comes to add more equipment (and weight) to the tripod. A teleprompter, monitors, lights, field recorders and microphones all add weight. Never plan to be at or near your tripod’s load capacity. If you have a 20 lb rig, a tripod rated at 30 lbs will obviously perform better (and safer) than one loaded to capacity.Head & Bowl MountNot all tripods come with a fluid head. It’s important to use a quality head with the appropriate counter-balance and weight load. Tripods that use bowl systems are the most widely used by professionals because it’s easy to level and balance a fluid head in a pinch to get that perfect shot.What is your go-to pair of sticks? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Rep Maturens real estate transfer tax fairness measure signed into law

first_img State Rep. David Maturen’s plan providing equity related to a tax charged when people sell real estate is now part of Michigan law.A seller whose home has lost value generally does not have to pay Michigan’s real estate transfer tax. Maturen’s new law – signed by Gov. Rick Snyder this week – will extend the same exemption to someone who bought vacant land, builds a house, and then sells the house.“This change addresses a circumstance that is rare, but was not adequately addressed in previous law,” said Maturen, of Vicksburg. “This is an equitable and fair solution that treats all sellers who have lost value in a home the same – whether they bought land with a home already on it, or bought vacant land and then built a home.”The legislation allows a property’s original state equalized value to be determined at the time a certificate of occupancy is issued for the residence. The home must qualify for a principal residence exemption.House Bill 4643 is now Public Act 172.### Categories: Maturen News,News 12Jun Rep. Maturen’s real estate transfer tax fairness measure signed into lawlast_img read more

Phishing success linked to incentives and sticking to an effective strategy

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Citation: Phishing success linked to incentives and sticking to an effective strategy (2018, February 21) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-phishing-success-linked-incentives-effective.html Not all phishing campaigns work, but when an attacker perseveres with a strategy that does it is the key to their success. That’s the finding of a new study focusing on the attacker, a largely ignored but crucial aspect of phishing. In addition to identifying successful strategies, it also reveals that attackers are motivated by quicker and larger rewards—with creative individuals putting more effort into constructing these malicious emails. Insights from the study, published today in open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology, can be used to develop tools and training procedures to detect phishing emails. Provided by Frontiers Gone phishin’: CyLab exposes how our ability to spot phishing emails is far from perfect “We find specific phishing strategies, such as the use of authoritative tone, expressing shared interest and sending notifications, are more likely to succeed,” says Dr. Prashanth Rajivan, lead author of the study and based at Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania, USA.Phishing is a common form of cyber-attack. Criminals impersonate a trustworthy third party to persuade people to visit fraudulent web sites or download malicious attachments, with the intent of compromising their security. While research has largely focused on the victims of these crimes, this new study looks at a critical aspect of phishing: the attacker’s behavior and strategies.”We created a game-like experiment to assess how well different strategies work, and to understand how incentives and success rates, or an individual’s creativity, can affect motivation,” explains Dr. Rajivan.In the experiment, human participants play the role of a phishing attacker and accumulate points, over a number turns, for successfully deceiving other people who are the ‘end-user’ performing an email management task. The game was carefully constructed to train and reward people into producing phishing emails that employ different strategies and topics.Strategies that were less likely to succeed included ‘offering deals,’ ‘selling illegal materials’ and ‘using a positive tone.'”People may be less receptive to strategies associated with scams that worked a decade ago,” explains Dr. Rajivan. “More successful strategies today would be ‘sending notifications,’ ‘use of authoritative tone,’ ‘taking advantage of trust by impersonating a friend or expressing shared interest,’ and ‘communicating failure’.”The repeated design of the game allowed the researchers to assess the attacker’s tactics over time. This revealed that perseverance with a successful strategy, rather than switching from one to another, can yield better results. The researchers attribute this to the attackers improving the email text at each turn.Incentives had a direct influence on motivation, with delayed rewards resulting in lesser effort. The easier and sooner high rewards were gained, the more effort an attacker applied to designing persuasive emails, as did individuals who scored high in a ‘creativity’ test. There was no evidence to suggest, however, that creativity could be used as a predictor of phishing success.”There has been a resurgence in phishing attacks in recent years and the regular, non-expert users of the Internet are usually the victims of these crimes. We need to improve current security practices to change the incentive structure for the attacker. If the rewards are greater than the costs, attackers will continue to exert more effort into phishing campaigns,” says Dr. Rajivan. “We think that attackers with higher creativity may be capable of changing and adapting emails to evade detection, even though their creativity cannot determine how much success they achieve in getting the end-user to respond.”He continues, “Our novel experimental design could be used to crowdsource people to play our game, which would give us lots of information on phishing success rates and how these emails can be adapted, thereby improving detection software. In addition, we could use it as a training tool to help people think like hackers to better detect phishing emails.” Journal information: Frontiers in Psychology Explore further More information: Frontiers in Psychology (2018). DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00135 , https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00135/full This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more