HackHarvard makes the majors

first_imgFor 36 hours, 479 undergraduates from around the world gathered to develop groundbreaking products from scratch. The forum was Harvard’s first collegiate hackathon, aptly named HackHarvard.The participants, who were selected from a pool of more than 3,700 applicants, came from not only top universities across the United States (including nearby Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Yale), but seven countries as well.At the Nov. 13-15 competition, teams vied for prizes that totaled more than $12,500. Designated a Major League Hacking hackathon, HackHarvard sponsors included Microsoft, Facebook, Capital One, Twitter, and Google.For Ajay Nathan ’18, the experience was rewarding because it allowed him to travel “from idea formation to completion in a short amount of time.” Nathan competed on a winning team with three other Harvard undergraduates.Some competitors found it valuable to work with teams from different universities, a unique aspect of the Harvard-based event. HackHarvard also distinguished itself from other hackathons at peer universities by allowing students to compete in multidisciplinary categories, including international development, government, and finance.Cameron Akker ’18, one of the organizers, noted that the diversity of participants reflected the diversity of these categories: Hackers ranged from freshmen still in their first computer science class to seniors with years of experience. By working with people passionate about fields other than pure computer science, hackers were able to apply technology to real-life problems in hospitals, banks, and government.According to Akker, the main takeaway was not only coding, but also creating a community and experiencing “something greater that just makes you hungry for more” in the world of multidisciplinary technology.Thirteen winning teams emerged from the scrum. Nathan’s group created an app, Prophit, that can make recommendations to customers about stores they might like to try based on their banking history, like “Netflix makes recommendations about movies you would like to watch.” The education category winner, Insight, used a virtual-reality viewer to simulate different types of vision, including color blindness. During the two-hour project fair on Nov. 15, the Insight team unintentionally helped someone discover that they were color-blind when they realized that the “normal” and “simulated” views looked the same.The grand prize winner, Myo Explorer, showcased a robot explorer that can be manipulated by a gesture-controlled armband and streamed video footage in order to record its journey.Kevin Leung of Rutgers University, a firefighter and EMT of six years, said that he and his teammates built their app, FireFighter_Monitoring, to combine his passions of technology and first response. The app, which won grand prize runner-up, uses a smart watch to send firefighter vitals to the chief, who can then send an evacuation signal to firefighters in danger.“Firefighters are so focused on getting their task[s] done and rescuing victims that they sometimes do not remember to check their own well-being … [FireFighter_Monitoring helps] officers on the outside know how their crews are doing on the inside,” Leung said. In future implementations, his team hopes to integrate firefighter position tracking, which would enable rescue missions that could potentially save the lives of many first responders.Waverley He ’18 was one of the organizers of HackHarvard.last_img read more

Jamestown Man Charged After Allegedly Urinating In Street, Then Fleeing Police

first_imgMGN Stock Image.LAKEWOOD – A City of Jamestown man is facing charges after police said he was observed urinating in the middle of Sunset Drive in the Village of Lakewood this week.Lakewood-Bust Police report the incident happened Wednesday afternoon.Officers say when Howard McAvoy, no age given, was confronted by patrol officers, he allegedly became uncooperative and then drove away in his vehicle.After a short pursuit, officers were able to get McAvoy to stop his vehicle. Police said he continued to be uncooperative, at times acting hostile to police and resisting arrest.Once in custody, officers alleged McAvoy tried to break the window of the patrol vehicle by slamming his forehead into the glass repeatedly.McAvoy was eventually arrested and charged with disorderly conduct, unlawful fleeing a police officer, resisting arrest and various vehicle and traffic law offenses.Officers said McAvoy was taken to the Chautauqua County Jail for central arraignment processing. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Mayo Clinic join group to study quality and cost of health care

first_imgSix of the nation’s leading health care systems today announced a first-of-its-kind collaboration to improve health care quality while reducing costs.Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Cleveland Clinic, Denver Health, Geisinger Health System, Intermountain Healthcare, and Mayo Clinic will join The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice to share data on outcomes, quality, and costs across a range of common and costly conditions and treatments. The group will determine best practices for delivering care for these conditions and will rapidly disseminate actionable recommendations to providers and health systems across the United States. In addition to achieving better quality and outcomes, the Collaborative intends to improve the efficiency of standard clinical care delivery to reduce the per capita cost in these conditions and to keep costs in pace with the consumer price index.The Collaborative will initially focus on eight conditions and treatments for which costs have been increasing rapidly in recent years and for which there are wide variations in quality and outcomes across the country. The conditions and treatments will be: knee replacement, diabetes, heart failure, asthma, weight loss surgery, labor and delivery, spine surgery, and depression, which together amount to hundreds of billions of dollars in direct medical costs each year.‘Increasing the value of the health care we receive, by improving the measurable outcomes and reducing the cost for delivery, is the goal of accountable health care organizations,’ said Thomas A. Colacchio, MD, president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health and a member of the executive committee of the new collaborative. ‘While a number of different collaborations between our institutions have been in place for some time, this particular initiative is an important step in generating and sharing quality and cost information at a sufficient level to more rapidly produce a significant impact on the lives of many patients as we work to achieve the healthiest population possible.’The six health care systems, with a combined patient population of more than 10 million people, will share data on outcomes and clinical protocols for the selected conditions and treatments to arrive at optimal care models which can then be implemented by many other health care systems. The Collaborative aims to see these best practices replicated across the country. The Dartmouth Institute will coordinate data sharing and analysis, and report results back to the Collaborative members to inform development of best practices. The Dartmouth Institute has twenty years of experience analyzing Medicare claims data and disseminating the findings. This same expertise will be applied to the work of the Collaborative.‘There is broad support from other health care systems across the country who want to participate in the work of the Collaborative,’ said Dr. James Weinstein, Director of The Dartmouth Institute. ‘It would be enormously valuable to have the broadest geographic and demographic representation in the sharing of outcomes and experience.’The Collaborative will first analyze Total Knee Replacement, a procedure that is performed more than 300,000 times a year in the U.S., with a cost that ranges on average from $16,000 to $24,000 per surgery. Simultaneously, Collaborative partners will build the metrics to study the care of the other selected conditions at their centers and arrive at best practices. Work to define best practices in diabetes and heart failure care will begin early in 2011.‘If we know that the treatment path for diabetes at one institution results in better clinical outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and lower overall costs, then there is knowledge to be shared and replicated in other institutions’ said Dr. Robert Nesse, Chief Executive Officer of Mayo Clinic Health System and member of Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. ‘We need to learn from each other and put systems in place that ensure that every patient gets the very best, most appropriate care, every time.’Developing models to reduce cost, while improving quality, is only part of the equation. An equally important goal is to impact the clinical care of patients across the country by disseminating these models quickly and working with providers and health systems to adapt them to local conditions. ‘In my view, the most critical piece of this initiative is the transfer of knowledge to other health systems,’ said Dr. Glenn Steele, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Geisinger Health System. ‘We need to aggressively implement a rapid learning network to disseminate our work and assist other systems in implementing these best practices, especially the highest cost systems.’Through The Dartmouth Institute, the Collaborative will also draw on the work of the Center for Health Care Delivery Science, established at Dartmouth College in May, 2010 and dedicated to research, education, collaboration, implementation, and public outreach to improve health and health care for patients, their families, providers, and populations.Source: Dartmouth-Hitchcock. 12.15.2010###last_img read more