Russia’s Novatek could almost triple Vysotsk LNG capacity

first_imgRussia’s Novatek, the operator and developer of two giant Arctic LNG export projects, may significantly increase output at its medium-scale liquefied natural gas export plant in Russia’s Baltic Sea port of Vysotsk.To remind, Novatek launched full-scale production at the Cryogas-Vysotsk project, jointly owned with Gazprombank, in April this year.The project’s initial design capacity is 660,000 tons of LNG per year, and its infrastructure includes a 42,000 cubic meters LNG storage tank and an offloading berth designed to handle LNG carriers with a capacity of up to 30,000 cubic meters.“We are considering the possibility of adding 1.1 million tons on top of the 660,000 tons, totaling 1.7 million tons,” Novatek’s finance chief Mark Gyetvay told LNG World News on Monday at the sidelines of the Flame conference in Amsterdam.In the first month of operations, Novatek sold about 71,000 tons or about 32 shipments of LNG of which 16 were delivered by trucks and 16 were delivered to vessels, according to Gyetvay.The project is essentially targeting bunker fuel markets in the Baltic region such as Scandinavia and northern Poland.Finland’s Gasum currently offtakes about 50 percent of the volume while the other 50 percent is handled by Novatek Gas and Power Asia, a unit of Novatek.“This project is important for Novatek,” Gyetvay said adding that it gives the company the first opportunity to respond to IMO’s stricter rules on bunker fuels.The potential of expanding the LNG project will largely depend on how successful the first year of operations would be as well as “how the market evolves as we go closer to the 2020 period of changing emissions,” he said.The Vysotsk expansion project would partly serve the planned mid-scale LNG transshipment terminal in Germany’s port of Rostock Novatek is developing with Belgium’s Fluxys.The Rostock project is currently in the design phase and Gyetvay expects this facility to be launched in “early 2020s” to correspond with the expansion of the Vysotsk project.Novatek is pushing the gas pedal with LNG fueling projects and the company is currently also building LNG truck fueling stations in Russia, specifically in the Chelyabinsk region, Gytevay said.“We are working with mining companies to convert diesel trucks to go on natural gas,” he said. By Mirza Duranlast_img read more

Wisconsin slides to 1-8 in Big Ten

first_imgWEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Having fought a nasty streak of roster-plaguing injuries, numerous close matches falling into the hands of opponents and a schedule that has made hotel rooms the weekend norm, the Wisconsin women’s tennis team had braved seemingly every element possible going into its matches against Purdue and Illinois this Saturday and Sunday.But after suffering a duo of losses over the weekend, mother nature saw clear to adding insult to injury for the embattled squad, grounding its bus in Champaign, Ill., while tornado alerts and stormy weather claimed control of the Midwestern town. The storm started building up Sunday afternoon while the Badgers were on the singles court against the Illini, peaking only after the completion of play.”At first it was very humid — it was very deceiving,” junior Kaylan Caiati said. “It actually was pretty hot considering it was pretty dark and windy.”And as the Badgers fell 4-3 to the Illini on the heels of a 7-0 loss to Purdue Saturday, that storm front almost certainly made an impact on the court.”In my singles match, serving, I tossed it up and hit the ball completely behind my head because the wind pushed it back,” Caiati recalled. “It is a finesse game, not a power game, when the wind is that much of a factor.”Though Caiati fell short to Macall Harkins, 7-5, 6-0, in singles play, she and UW freshman Elizabeth Carpenter pulled off an upset 8-1 victory over the Illini’s No. 41 tandem of Harkins and Emily Wang in doubles play earlier Sunday, helping the Badgers earn the day’s first point. “In doubles, I was very happy with how I played and how Liz played. I think we kept our focus,” Caiati said. “We started off very strong … and we just kept that momentum throughout the entire match.”Wisconsin’s other two points on the day came by way of singles victories from Carpenter and Chelsea Nusslock, defeating Wang and Momei Qu 6-2, 7-5 and 6-3, 6-2, respectively. “It felt really good to win [Sunday] after a few losses,” Nusslock said. “We all really wanted to show something for ourselves, to do well … after the 7-0 loss, we wanted to redeem ourselves.”And that 7-0 loss here Saturday certainly did mark a point of difficulty for the squad, as only one Badger managed to claim more than three games in a set during singles player, with sophomore Morgan Tuttle eventually dropping to the Boilermakers’ Anna Dzeva 6-4, 7-6(1) in the day’s closest — and longest — match. “Hats off to Purdue, because what they did do — and what Purdue has done — and they did it the best that I have ever seen a Purdue tennis team do, is that they were as cohesive as they ever have been, they were behind each other, and they individually imposed their games on us,” head coach Patti Henderson said after play Saturday.last_img read more

BGC highlights UK casinos ‘community response’ under lockdown orders

first_img StumbleUpon Submit ASA monitoring sweep marks gambling as the worst underage advertising offender August 26, 2020 Share UK gambling adopts toughest online advertising code to protect underage audiences August 27, 2020 BGC calls for updates to ‘outdated’ payment regulations August 21, 2020 Related Articles Share The Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) continues to pressure the government on delivering clarity to the UK casino sector and its workforce, following the disappointing news that casino venues will not be allowed to reopen this July.Branded in the same category as nightclubs, England’s casino venues were told to remain in lockdown, and given no indication as to their future schedules – a decision that has wreaked havoc on a sector employing 14,000 staff.This weekend, the BGC published a statement by Matt Rudd, the General Manager of the Grosvenor Casino in Broad Street, Birmingham, in which he described the real-life consequences facing venue management and effected staff.“I’m the General Manager of our Grosvenor Broad Street casino in Birmingham and have worked here for the past six years. I’ve seen a lot of change in that time, but the past few months have been the most challenging of the lot. On top of that, the past few days and weeks have been among the most perplexing as I’ve watched other venues reopen their doors.” Rudd’s statement read.Having placed 74 Broad Street staff on furlough, Rudd addressed the dire choices being made by casino venues managers across the land, seeking to mitigate the financial damages of the coronavirus pandemic.Despite facing hardships, Rudd highlighted the community work undertaken by Grosvenor venues in supporting NHS frontline staff, emergency services and further vulnerable groups, providing and delivering hot meals through Rank Group’s arrangement with the Blue Light Card scheme.“My casino is very much part of the local community; lockdown didn’t change that – it simply gave us a new way of showcasing our community values” Rudd stated. .Working through unprecedented times, Rudd detailed overseeing a near four months of diligent work ensuring that his casino would be the safest venue for the general public on Broad Street.During lockdown, Rudd and part-time colleagues would implement comprehensive changes to the casino layout and safety provisions, fitting social distancing measurements and signage, and the installation of Perspex dividers on gaming tables, slots and electronic roulette terminals.Additional precautions saw Rudd install hand sanitisers across the venue, whilst training colleagues on further customer care procedures and cleaning standards to ensure his casino was ‘covid-secure’.“I’ve taken the opportunity to look around what else is happening here in Birmingham and am delighted that we appear to have gone the extra distance to ensure that customers will receive the safest possible welcome and experience when we’re finally allowed to unlock our doors.”“We love working here on Broad Street and we’re straining at the leash to get back to giving our customers a safe and enjoyable experience. I can’t escape the fact that by virtue of remaining closed, we’re delivering no tax receipts to the Government. We’re reliant on the furlough scheme and we’re not really contributing to the vibrancy of the local entertainment scene in this part of the city. That’s what we’re about and it is what we miss most.”Rudd’s statement follows, the BGC publishing its open letter to Chancellor Rishi Sunak, stating that the Treasury could not afford to maintain a sector that contributed weekly tax revenues of £5.8 million in the sidelines, as the government plans its economic recovery.last_img read more