SMC students host Hypatia Day to encourage STEM participation

first_imgSaint Mary’s will emphasize feminism in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields this Saturday with Hypatia Day. Named after the Greek mathematician, astronomer and philosopher Hypatia, the conference takes place to encourage young girls in seventh and eighth grades interested in participating in STEM fields.Associate professor of mathematics and computer science Kristin Kuter said the day is meant to interest more young women in STEM fields before they enter high school.“The goal is to encourage these girls to continue to study STEM and to pursue an education in STEM,” Kuter said.These girls will participate with Saint Mary’s students in activities in the fields in which they are interested. The chemistry, biology, physics, math, computer science, engineering and nursing clubs will host sessions with the girls, teaching them new things and giving demonstrations.The day will start with a speech from keynote speaker Laura Kloepper, assistant biology professor. Kloepper said she wants to inspire younger girls to be in science.“I like to get other people excited, not just about my work, but about science in general too,” Kloepper said.After the speech, the girls will go to sessions and demonstrations in their chosen fields.The biology club will help its participants to extract DNA from strawberries and put the DNA in necklaces.“All the students can go home wearing a necklace of strawberry DNA,” Kloepper said.Senior biology major Stephanie Dreessen said the club will also have the students examine and dissect preserved specimens.“We have a sheep heart, some crayfish, [we’ll] look at differences of a turtle that lives on land verses water, some owls,” Dreessen said. “And we’re also looking at some genetic base stuff, such as fruit flies, seeing some differences underneath a microscope.”According to senior nursing major Tyler Booth, the girls attending the nursing session will learn a lot of nursing practices, including bandaging and taking vitals.“We’re teaching them how to wrap legs and arms,” Booth said, “We’re teaching them how to take pulses, blood pressures. We’re teaching them how to listen to heart sounds and lung sounds on our medi-man.”Junior physics and applied math major Rachel Bonek said the physics club will teach its students projectile motion with a mini-cannonball demonstration.“They can calculate how far it’s going to go based on the angle in the force we put behind it,” Bonek said. “It should be fun.”One of the events of the day focuses on talking to parents about how to encourage their daughters who are interested in science.“We talk about the academic preparation and development of the daughters,” Kuter said.Senior biology major Cassie Libbing will be on the student panel, made up of STEM majors, which will answer parents’ questions about education and how to support their daughters.“Just by sharing experience, I think it gives them a better vision of what it might come to be for their daughters and also see the variety of paths you can take within the STEM area,” Libbing said.For the event, almost as many Saint Mary’s students will volunteer as there are girls that attend. Kuter said this can influence the visiting girls by showing how many female college students are pursing majors in STEM fields.“These middle schoolers really do get to see a lot of examples of the possibilities and what the potential is with these undergraduate Saint Mary’s students,” Kuter said.Part of Hypatia Day’s goal is to reach out to girls in this age group to keep them from dropping their interest in the sciences, and Kuter said the impact of the day should keep these girls interested in science.“Research has shown that that is the age when girls start pulling away from the STEM fields,” Kuter said. “That transition is key in order to keep women engaged within the STEM fields.”Kloepper said Saint Mary’s, as an all-women’s college, facilitates a connection between its students and young girls interested in the sciences through events like Hypatia Day.“It’s nice that we have this opportunity to reach out to them and kind of say, ‘No, stick with it, it’s an amazing career path,’” Kloepper said.Booth said she personally felt this impact when she was in middle school.“I felt I was very English-y and liked writing, and I wasn’t really interested in sciences because I thought that was something only boys did,” Booth said. “So I think it’s important to inspire them and show them that it’s something they can do too.”Tags: Hypatia Day, science, STEMlast_img read more

Adrienne Warren Tapped for Workshop of Tina Turner Bio-Musical

first_img Simply the best! Adrienne Warren, who received a Tony nod this year for Shuffle Along, has been tapped to lead a workshop of a Tina Turner bio-musical, Tina. The legendary singer will attend the December 16 industry event, which will be performed by a cast of 14, the Daily Mail reports. Phyllida Lloyd (Mamma Mia!) will direct the project, which features a book by Olivier winner Katori Hall (The Mountaintop).Turner told the Mail that “one of the most surprising and wonderful discoveries for me in this process has been that my songs tell my story.” Some of her famous numbers include “Proud Mary,” “Nutbush City Limits,” “Private Dancer,” “What’s Love Got To Do With It,” and “Simply The Best.” No word yet on which tunes will make the cut; the musical is aiming to open in London 2018.Born Anna Mae Bullock in 1939 in Nutbush, Turner rose to fame in the 1960s alongside her husband Ike. She later revealed in her autobiography that she had suffered domestic abuse at his hands—they separated in 1976 and divorced two years later. Turner later made a massive comeback in the 1980s. The Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll has sold 180 million records worldwide and been honored with eleven Grammy Awards. Adrienne Warren (Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Adrienne Warren View Comments Star Fileslast_img read more

Focus on faces in Holocaust memorial

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Regarding the Niskayuna Holocaust Memorial. I’m not Jewish. I don’t live in Niskayuna. I seldom travel Route 7. I’ve only been to the Holy Redeemer Cemetery a couple of times.But I, too, have strong feelings regarding this issue. My father was a World War II soldier and among those who liberated the Buchenwald concentration camp. He witnessed all these objects of horror you wish to display. But when he spoke of being there, he spoke of the faces.Let’s memorialize the people, those lost and those saved. It should be a place where you can honor those who had their lives taken, fought for their lives and fought for the lives of others. I know my father would have visited such a memorial, but he would never have gone to the one which is planned.Creators, please listen to the people both past and present.Marilyn ChewCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Peru gets out of jail to win prisoners ‘World Cup’

first_imgIt wasn’t the real thing — that begins in Russia later this month — but a deadly serious competition nevertheless that Peru’s prison authorities are calling the first World Cup of prisons.Anticipation of the Andean nation’s first appearance at a World Cup finals in 36 years has reached fever pitch, and for its chronically overcrowded prisons, the shadow prison tournament provided a rare, sweet breath of freedom.“At last I can breathe a little air,” sighed Francis Valero, a tattooed 27-year-old locked up in Lima’s Lurigancho jail for drug trafficking. “We are hoping this will help us get reintegrated into society for good conduct.”Each of the 16 prisons included in the unique competition took the name, and the colors, of a country participating in the finals.A prison warden stand guard as inmates from Peruvian jails take part in a mock World Cup tournament at a prison in Huaral, Peru, on May 15, 2018 © AFP / CRIS BOURONCLEAll the matches observed the national anthems of each participating “national team” and officiating at the matches were a trio of professional referees.The initial phases of the monthlong competition, which involved shackled inmates crisscrossing the country in buses amid high security, was played in dusty exercise areas. The prize for the finalists? Playing in the wide open spaces of the capital’s massive 60,000-capacity Lima Stadium.– High security –Inmates play soccer © AFP / ERNESTO BENAVIDESFor security reasons, the stands at the stadium were almost empty. The few family members permitted per player were vastly outnumbered by 200 armed police wearing bullet-proof vests.But that did not stop them from living the moment as if they were fans, and players, in a real World Cup finals.Peru, represented by Lurigancho prison, beat “Russia” — a team from Chimbote prison in northern Peru — on penalty kicks after it ended all square at full time.The champions received a cup, gold medals and sports outfits as prizes.“I feel free for a moment, I know that I will go back very soon. This title, I dedicate it to my family, the sacrifice was worthwhile,” said victorious Lurigancho player Thomas Manuel Aguirre, serving a sentence for aggravated robbery.“The magic of football is that it has what establishes the rules of a community,” said National Penitentiary Institute head Carlos Vasquez told AFP.“In football, just like in a community, we face a team and we have to understand that’s it’s not an enemy but the other side, you have to play by the rules of the game.”– ‘Critical overcrowding’ –Like a real tournament, the tournament was grouped into four “host” prisons in cities in Ancon, Chimbote, Ica and Lima.The semi-finals were played in Lurigancho, which has the dubious reputation of being the most overcrowded of Peru’s 69 prisons. Built to houses 3,500 prisoners, it is home to 9,700 inmates, many of them categorized as “highly dangerous.”“Overcrowding is critical in Peruvian prisons, where there are 187,000 inmates. But you sense it less when there is order,” Vasquez said, after handing out the winners’ medals after the final.“The inmates may have violated the rules, they may have committed a crime, but football unites them along with the nation with the country’s participation in the World Cup.”For inmate Omar Jaramillo Mendez, in jail for aggravated robbery, it was a chance to get a feel for life outside prison walls again.“For us it represents something important, that we, as human beings, reintegrate into society and become better people in the future,” he said.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000A shadow prison tournament provided a rare, sweet breath of freedom as anticipation of Peru’s first appearance at World Cup finals in 36 years reached fever pitch © AFP / ERNESTO BENAVIDESLIMA, Peru, Jun 2 – It sounds like a punchline: how does a team of prisoners win the World Cup? On penalties!That’s how Peru did it, getting out of jail to beat Russia in a tense final at the giant Lima Stadium last week.last_img read more