Cancelled Flight Causes Phil Lesh To Miss Twiddle Show, But The Band Jams Grateful Dead In His Honor

first_imgThe unfortunate news left Twiddle Lesh-less, but some Bay Area musicians stepped up and joined in for the occasion. Guitarists Dan Lebowitz and Grahame Lesh – Phil’s son – both made their way to sit in with Twiddle, as did keyboardist Todd Stoops. The band closed out their set with an all-too-appropriate cover of the Grateful Dead’s “Eyes Of The World,” emotionally ending a great performance.Check out videos of “Every Soul” featuring Dan Lebowitz and Todd Stoops, as well as “Eyes Of The World” featuring Todd Stoops and Grahame Lesh, streaming below via Must Have Media. While things didn’t work out with Phil Lesh this time, let’s hope Twiddle can find a time to work with him again.Setlist: Twiddle | Terrapin Crossroads | San Rafael, CA | 2/27/17Set: Earth Mama, Syncopated Healing, Dusk Till Dawn#, Every Soul#*, Latin Tang, Doinkinbonk!!!*, Subconscious Prelude, Eyes Of The World*^Encore: Hatti’s Jam > When it Rains, It Poors*# = w/ Dan Lebowitz* = w/ Todd Stoops^ = w/ Grahame Lesh[Setlist via iTwiddle on FB] Twiddle fans were certainly elated to learn that Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh would be joining the band at Terrapin Crossroads last night. That was the plan, at least, but the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.last_img read more

Positive disruption

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.When Saamon Legoski sees something wrong, he feels compelled to make it right.Last year, for example, while working as a behavioral specialist and staff sergeant for the U.S. Army in Kuwait, he helped several of his peers and soldiers come forward with allegations of sexual violence. A formal investigation substantiated the allegations, he said, and the accused sergeant was discharged from the Army.“I’ve learned to be disruptive in a positive way,” said Legoski.These days, as a student in Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s M.P.H.-45 program, he’s focused on redressing the wrongs that arise when people, because of race, national origin, or income, are treated unfairly with respect to environmental laws and policies. He said it riles him that underprivileged neighborhoods are often the most polluted, that tax credits for electric cars predominantly benefit the wealthy, and that the world’s poorest communities bear the biggest burdens from global warming.Legoski plans to become an environmental justice attorney — one who understands enough science to be an expert litigator in court. “At the end of the day, I don’t want the opposing counsel to fool judges, juries, or me with scientific-sounding nonsense,” he said. “I want to be a one-stop shop for interpreting scientific data in the courtroom.”Saamon Legoski joined the military after high school. He is pictured in Kuwait. Courtesy of Saamon LegoskiOrder from chaosLegoski is clear about his goals these days, but that wasn’t always the case. His childhood was chaotic. He grew up in southern California, where parental disputes sometimes led to living in homeless shelters with his mother and younger siblings. He worked in school cafeterias to pay for his lunches. “I got better in high school, but in the earlier years, the disruption would come with me from the house to the classroom,” he recalled.After high school he decided to join the military “to get away from everything” — and loved it. “It was the first place where I challenged myself and leaders really encouraged me,” he said. “Plus, in the military I found a lot of people who had the experience that I did. Growing up I was usually the poorest kid, the least well-dressed, usually just the ‘least’ among people. But when I got to the Army, I was on pretty equal footing with a lot of people.” He says the Army helped him mature and straighten out his rough edges.During his yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, Legoski saw scores of what he thought were needless deaths, and fellow soldiers suffering post-traumatic stress. The experience cemented his interest in psychology, and also led him to think deeply about how to avoid war. “The Afghanistan war led me to believe that our political leaders weren’t effective at conflict resolution and would keep us in Afghanistan indefinitely,” Legoski said.In 2013 he enrolled at Stanford to study psychology. He chose as his adviser social psychologist Lee Ross, who had done real-life conflict resolution work in Ireland, Israel, and other parts of the world. “I spent a lot of time in and outside of class picking his brain about political and social conflicts and pathways to resolution,” Legoski said.Matters of justiceDuring a Stanford quarter in Washington, D.C., Legoski took a seminar in civil rights law and learned about “disparate impact,” which occurs when laws or rules negatively impact a particular group of people. “It’s up to civil rights lawyers to prove disparate impact through testimony, data, and analysis in the courtroom,” Legoski said. He decided that becoming a lawyer “would be a good career match for my strong sense of justice,” he said.The field of environmental justice caught his attention when he spent a year as an executive fellow in California’s Department of Toxic Substances Control, working on projects to keep consumers and workers safe from the toxic chemicals found in some nail products. The field “had all the civil rights components that I want and I love,” he said.Environmental advocateThanks to support from the Harvard Presidential Scholars Program, Legoski was able to come to Harvard Chan School to get the science background he wanted. In a class last fall on analytical methods and exposure assessment, he and a group of fellow students studied the role of compostable beverage containers in microplastic contamination.Jonathan Buonocore, research scientist at Harvard Chan School, advised Legoski and the other students on their research. “With the issue of plastics, we have been hearing about impacts on sea turtles and pollution on beaches, but Legoski wondered if humans are getting exposed to microplastics through compostable cups,” he said. “He took it upon himself to find a way to address the question.” Previous studies have suggested that microplastics consumption may harm health. The students found significant leaching of microplastics from some of the compostable cups they looked at.While at Harvard Chan, Legoski has done field work at Clean Water Action, an environmental advocacy group. Last fall he spoke on the organization’s behalf to a Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection panel about the health impacts of the Wheelabrator Saugus incinerator, the nation’s oldest. He also spoke at a Massachusetts Department of Transportation board hearing about the need in underserved communities for better public transit service, lower fares, and reduced transportation-related pollution. On campus, he serves as a student ambassador for the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment (C-CHANGE), helping promote collaborations among departments to address environmental issues.“He’s definitely a driven individual and has a good line of sight on how to use both scientific evidence and the legal mechanisms we have to improve public health and, in particular, right environmental justice wrongs,” said Buonocore.“What I love as an environmental justice advocate and future lawyer is that I will be able to tackle civil rights from a perspective that takes many issues into account — environmental issues, housing, transportation, job insecurity, food costs— that are often treated as separate issues by policymakers,” said Legoski. “It’s a field where I’ll be able to channel my passion for helping people and making sure there’s justice.”last_img read more

Newcastle resume talks with Dede Ayew again

first_imgNewcastle United have resumed negotiations with Marseille over the transfer of Ghana international Andre Ayew.Ayew, 25, is out of contract at the end of the season, but has been linked with a number of sides following his performances at the Africa Cup of Nations earlier this year.The Magpies have already spoken to his representatives to make an offer ahead of this summer’s transfer window.Roma, Tottenham Hotspur and Everton have also been linked with Ayew, who has scored six goals for Marseille this season.Wolfsburg and Borussia Dortmund have also shown ineterst in Ayew, but Newcastle are convinced they can lure the forward to the north east.Ayew has scored two goals in his last three games for Marseille. –last_img read more

Dave Roberts, Dodgers don’t sound eager to part, but manager’s contract status is uncertain

first_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season PHOENIX — The Dodgers won 195 games in Dave Roberts’ first two seasons as manager – the most for any manager since Earl Weaver started his Hall of Fame career by winning 217 games in his first two seasons with the Baltimore Orioles (1969-70).Roberts led the Dodgers to the National League Championship Series in his first year, the World Series (the franchise’s first in 29 years) in his second year.And despite a season filled with stretches of underachievement and disappointment, another 90-win season, a postseason berth and potential return trips to the NLCS and World Series are all still in play as the Dodgers enter the final weekend of the regular season.So why doesn’t Dave Roberts have a contract for next season? The idea that Roberts does not have autonomy is “not accurate despite a couple guys asking it over and over,” Friedman said. But he hesitates to shoot it down because “any time you have to answer that question you come off as defensive – even when it’s not true.”“There’s definitely stuff that plays out that I would have done differently – just as I’m sure there’s stuff I do in my job that he would have done differently,” Friedman said. “But we have a good relationship, open lines of communication and talk through things.“For me and Farhan, who are so mired in personnel decisions, we’ll bounce things off of him and oftentimes he’ll have a thought that is real helpful because of how mired we are. And conversely, he’ll talk to us about some things that are going on with lineups or pecking order of bullpen guys and we’ll have thoughts that are helpful because we’re not as mired in it.“I think that’s how a healthy, strong organization operates. I feel strongly that’s the dynamic in play. And that is the dynamic in play.” How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies “We have a really good working relationship,” Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said this week. “I think both sides expect to work together for a long time. We’ve had conversations and I think it’s one of those things where all of our focus is on winning a championship and picking that up when we get to the offseason.“I think because the relationship is so strong and the communication – I get it being a question. But it’s not really a concern for any of us because of the relationship in place.”Roberts acknowledged that there were some contract discussions early in the season but “right now it’s just best to focus on winning baseball games” and his ‘lame-duck’ status does not weigh on his mind.“I think we’ve done a really good job here in the past three years,” Roberts said. “I love it here. I love everything about it. I’m hopeful something will get done. The truth of the matter is there’s an option on me for next year. It’s not my choice anyway.”The contract Roberts signed with the Dodgers in November 2015 was for three years with a club option for the 2019 season.center_img Friedman declined to answer when asked why the Dodgers haven’t simply exercised that option already. The fact that he and Roberts say there were “conversations” about his contract earlier this year implies the Dodgers would like to sign Roberts to a multi-year extension. Friedman declined to confirm that.If the Dodgers do want Roberts, the 2016 NL Manager of the Year, to remain manager for 2019 and beyond, the question might be how much value they place on a manager.Financial terms of manager’s contracts are not released. But Roberts is believed to be making $1 million in the third year of his contract, a salary that places him in the bottom third of MLB managers – in company with rookie managers like Mickey Callaway (Mets), Dave Martinez (Nationals) and Gabe Kapler (Phillies) and a long way from the Angels’ Mike Scioscia, the Giants’ Bruce Bochy and the Cubs’ Joe Maddon, who are believed to be making $6 million as the highest-salaried managers in baseball.Of the 12 managers who are making $1 million or less this season (including interim managers), only three have led a team into the playoffs – Jeff Banister in Texas (fired last week), Torey Lovullo in Arizona and Roberts. Only Roberts has a postseason series win on his resume.Roberts’ World Series counterpart, Astros manager A.J. Hinch, entered 2018 in the same situation. His contract was set to expire following this season and the club held an option for 2019. He received a multi-year extension last month. Financial terms were not disclosed.“This season has played out in a little bit of a strange way,” Friedman said when asked to evaluate Roberts’ job performance this season. “But through it all, Doc has been incredibly positive and steady at the helm.”He has also accepted the new job description for his position – one that requires the manager to accept constant input and direction from the front office and serve as a conduit for the information generated by that front office to reach the players.Perhaps most difficult, the new job dynamic also requires the manager to be the public face of decisions that aren’t always completely his – particularly for Roberts whose pre- and post-game press availability is televised fare while decision-makers like Friedman and GM Farhan Zaidi are only occasionally visible. That dynamic has also created a public perception of managers like Roberts as merely button-pushers, more middle manager than classic baseball manager.“It’s not the truth at all. I don’t know where this narrative came from,” Roberts said of the notion that the front office dictates lineup and in-game decisions. “If you had that, then you have no credibility in the clubhouse. Our guys are smart enough to understand that.“Are there things we discuss? Absolutely. I welcome it. I ask for help. I don’t have all the answers nor do the coaches. So if you can have somebody look at it from a different lens, I think that’s helpful and healthy. But ultimately, I make the decisions and that’s the way it should be.”Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco last_img read more

“One of the league’s best defenders” – Chelsea’s £3.5m player profiled

first_imgDid you know?1. Miazga joined the Red Bulls academy in 2009 and signed a homegrown player contract in 2013, aged 18.2. He made his MLS debut in September 2013 in the 76th minute against Houston Dynamo.3. He has played 38 senior league and play-off appearances in the US.4. Miazga doesn’t require a work permit as he holds a Polish passport; his parents are from the eastern European country and in 2012 he made an appearance for their Under-18 team, before opting to play for the US.5. He made his senior debut for Jurgen Klinsmann’s side last November in a World Cup qualifier against St Vincent and the Grenadines. Expert eye:Speaking to talkSPORT, retired American goalkeeper Brad Friedel, spoke admirably of the centre back: “[Mizaga’s] a very tall figure. He’s a centre half. He’s come on in the last 18 months incredibly well; he’s currently in with Jurgen Klinsmann’s team as we speak, and this kid’s got a great future ahead of him.”New York Red Bulls manager Jesse Marsch said: “I think in many ways he has been one of the best defenders in the league this year and should be considered in that echelon. His starting points are very high – everything from his mentality, to his awareness, to his athleticism – which means his ceiling is very high.”Video evidence: Chelsea have signed defender Matt Miazga from New York Red Bulls in a reported £3.5m transfer.But who is the 20-year-old? Is he an alternative to £50m-rated defender John Stones?talkSPORT has taken a closer look at the man nearing a move to Stamford Bridge.Name: Matthew MiazgaDate of birth: July 19, 1995 (age 20)Birthplace: Clifton, New Jersey, United StatesPosition: DefenderHeight: 1.93m (6ft 4in)Club: New York Red BullsWhat’s the latest?In his press conference, manager Guus Hiddink revealed Miazga is now a Chelsea player.“He will be one of the squad members for the rest of the season, a young guy stepping up to the national team, and if you have young players you can see what they are capable of in training,” he explained. Miazga has also been monitored by Liverpool, Manchester United, Arsenal and Manchester City. The reported £3.5m transfer fee is on the low side given he had a year remaining on his current contract at the Red Bull Arena and turned down improved terms before the turn of the new year. New York Red Bulls defender Matt Miazga 3 3 3last_img read more

NOEL GETS CHASED IN NEW ‘EVERYBODY PLAYS FOR JIMMY’ ALL-IRELAND VIDEO

first_imgEVERYBODY CHASES NOEL IN EVERBODY PLAYS FOR JIMMYHERE’S the legendary Noel Sweeney as you’ve never seen him before – getting chased by hundreds of Donegal-mad GAA girls for a new video supporting the county team!The Swilly Drive boss was filming scenes for the video for the song ‘Everybody Plays For Jimmy’ at O’Donnell Park in Letterkenny.The Ladies GAA U-12 development squad was there having a blitz – and were soon recruited as extras! Orgaanisers are asking anybody interested in taking part in the ‘Everybody plays for Jimmy’ Donegal song and YouTube video to be released this coming week to submit photographs or short (5-15seconds) dvd/video footage of ALL THINGS DONEGAL by Monday morning (4th Sep) 11am, to B Carr, at [email protected] will then be short listing the happier, snappier more colourful shots/vids for inclusion in the final edit, sung by local artists including Noel of course, Trevor Loughrey, (and starring Alma Kavanagh as ‘Granny’ amongst other future screen stars!) to be broadcast mid-week under the title ‘Everybody plays for Jimmy – Up Donegal!’What they are looking for…..Choruses: Video compilations of children/gangs/groups miming the words in specific locations, such as schools, pitches, shops, streets, beach, wherever to be mixed with photographs of supporters dressed in donegal colours etc. Verse 1:Pub photographs and videos (adults) in green and goldVerse 2:Grandmothers, bingo-ladies, dinner-ladies, shoppers, more grandmothers! (in green and gold)Verse 3: Kids kids and more kids, families, football pitches, sports groups (gymnasts, footballers, cyclists etc) in green and gold.Get going for Donegal!NOEL GETS READY FOR THE SCENE!THE EXTRAS FOR THE VIDEO SHOOT FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTYNOEL GETS CHASED IN NEW ‘EVERYBODY PLAYS FOR JIMMY’ ALL-IRELAND VIDEO was last modified: September 2nd, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:NOEL GETS CHASED IN NEW ‘EVERYBODY PLAYS FOR JIMMY’ ALL-IRELAND VIDEOlast_img read more