Members Of Lettuce, Thievery Corp, Galactic, TAB & More Perform All-Improv Show [Full Audio]

first_imgLast Friday, May 20th, the Everyone Orchestra returned to Gypsy Sally’s in Washington, DC for yet another stellar performance in the nation’s capital. Matt Butler is joined by an outstanding lineup for this tour, featuring Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff on guitar (Lettuce), Jeff Franca on percussion (Thievery Corporation), Rob Mercurio on bass (Galactic), Jennifer Hartswick on trumpet and vocals (Trey Anastasio Band), Natalie Cressman on trombone and vocals (Trey Anastasio Band), Cris Jacobs, whose birthday it was, on guitar and vocals (The Bridge), and Johnny Kimock on drums (Mike Gordon, K I M O C K).Those that are familiar with Everyone Orchestra know that they bring a 100% improv show, with Butler conducting the band and audience. It means attendees never know just what they are in for. There’s no trying to predict what the band will open or close with, who they’ll cover, or whether there will be a bust out. We just sit back and enjoy the ride. From purely an entertainment standpoint, these shows are some of the most interesting and exciting to watch.The next stop for this crew is Summer Camp Music Festival, but for now you can check out their entire DC show from taper Will Urquhart, below.last_img read more

Vendor thought H2N2 virus was safe, officials say

first_img In a separate teleconference, Dr. Julie Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said the test kits containing the virus were sent out beginning last September. “We want to reassure the public that we have no evidence of any health threat to anyone in the community as a result of this” and no evidence of illness in lab workers, she said. “We have very good surveillance for influenza in the United States and we’ve not observed any unusual patterns of influenza this year. . . . If an unusual influenza virus had emerged, we’d certainly know about it by now.” Meridian Bioscience of Cincinnati sent samples of influenza A(H2N2) to thousands of laboratories, mostly in the United States, in kits used by the labs to test their ability to identify viruses. The test kits were sent on behalf of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and three other professional organizations. Gerberding explained that for accreditation, labs generally need only to show they can determine if a virus is influenza and whether it’s type A or B. “That’s why we didn’t learn about this earlier,” she said. The CAP instructed Meridian to include an influenza A virus in its test kits but did not specify the type beyond that, according to Schwartz. Henceforward the college plans to give more specific instructions, he said. Apr 13, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The company that sent samples of the influenza virus that caused the 1957 flu pandemic to thousands of laboratories knew the identity of the virus but apparently assumed it wasn’t hazardous because of its current safety classification, officials said today. But Schwartz and federal health officials said today the virus poses very little risk to lab workers and the public. Gerberding said it wasn’t exactly clear why Meridian picked the H2N2 virus, but commented, “It was probably a situation where the advantages of using a strain that grows well and can be easily manipulated in the lab were the driving force.” Before the problem came to light, the CDC had made a recommendation that the H2N2 virus be reclassified as a BSL-3 agent, Gerberding said. She promised to speed up the reclassification. The CDC determines the classifications in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health. In a teleconference this afternoon, CAP spokesman Dr. Jared Schwartz said Meridian knew what the virus was but believed it was safe. In selecting it, the company had determined that the virus was classified as a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) agent, which meant it could legally be used in the kits, he said. Earlier reports suggested that the virus might have been mislabeled. The situation was discovered in March by Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Man. Schwartz and Gerberding said the H2N2 virus used in the kits was a reference strain, meaning it had been used in labs as a quality-control specimen for years. Gerberding said reference strains often become less virulent over time. “It’s possible that this strain of virus poses a very very low risk of transmission efficiency in the public,” she said. “But we have to err on the side of caution.” The CDC notified the CAP of the situation Apr 8 and asked the organization to inform the labs and tell them to destroy the virus samples, Schwartz said. “We’ve asked them [the labs] to sign a piece of paper attesting that they’ve destroyed the virus. We’ve received over 1,500 of them back already,” he said. He later added, “We don’t know what the decision process was. It appears to have been an error in judgment in sending out an organism that had not been seen in the United States or other countries in many, many years.” “We now know that they knew it was an H2N2 virus; had the college known that, we would not have allowed them to send out an H2N2, even though it’s classified as biosafety level 2,” Schwartz said. In BSL-3 labs, agents are handled with equipment designed to prevent any airborne contamination and resulting respiratory exposure, Gerberding said. Level 2 precautions are less stringent, but they can also protect workers from respiratory exposure when they are followed properly, she added.last_img read more

Dynagas LNG Partners posts Q2 loss

first_imgClean Energy (Image courtesy of Dynagas LNG Partners)Dynagas LNG Partners, a limited partnership formed by the Greek shipowner Dynagas, on Tuesday reported a second-quarter loss of $5.2 million, after reporting a profit in the same quarter a year before.The company posted loss per common unit of $0.19 for the three months ended June 30.Adjusted earnings per share and EBITDA were at $0.07 and $22.9 million, respectfully.Dynagas quarterly voyage revenues stood at $32 million as compared to $42.6 million in the second quarter of 2016.“We have previously communicated that this quarter would be affected by scheduled class surveys and related dry dockings for three of our six vessels which would result in cost items and would also qualify as off-hire under the relevant contracts,” said Chief Executive Tony Lauritzen.“We are satisfied that the class surveys, including dry dockings, were completed in a quick and efficient manner with an average of approximately 15 days per vessel from arrival to departure at the shipyard. The vessels are on a 5-year special survey cycle, therefore we expect the next special class survey and related dry docking to occur in about 5 years,” said Lauritzen.last_img read more