The Main Squeeze To Celebrate Album Release At Boulder’s Fox Theatre

first_imgOn April 28th, funky L.A.-via-Chicago quintet The Main Squeeze will make their way to Boulder, CO’s Fox Theatre to celebrate the release of their stellar new album, Without A Sound. The album release party, presented by Live For Live Music, comes as part of the band’s nationwide spring tour in support of the new LP. According to guitarist Max Newman in an interview with L4LM, “This show’s going to be really sick. We’re in the process of doing all the live arrangements for our new tunes right now, and the way everything’s coming together has got us really excited.”The Main Squeeze Performs “Return Of The Mack” With Vulfpeck’s Antwaun Stanley At Fool’s ParadiseExplains Newman, “In the studio, I can lay down three or four different guitar parts, we can lay down three or four different synths, we can do a real bass and a synth bass, we can do a real drum set and add some electronic, hip-hop drums to fatten it up, stuff like that. So the challenge of taking this stuff live is, ‘how do we still portray the songs with that energy, but with just our five pieces?’ Boulder will be a great showcase for all these new arrangements. The town’s got a great music scene, our management is based out of Boulder, so that’s sort of becoming even more of a hot spot for us.”Without A Sound serves as a musical snapshot for the band, capturing their experience of relocating from The Windy City to the City of Angels. “Really, the whole thing is meant to capture our experience of moving to Los Angeles,” says Newman, “We started working on music right when we got out here. We didn’t really have a specific plan to make an album, necessarily, but we got here and had two months before we went out on tour and sort of realized—let’s just fuckin’ do this! Let’s capture this moment of arriving in L.A. It’s never going to be our first time living in this new place again. We figured as soon as we go out on tour and come back, a lot of that energy of having new surroundings dissipates since tour is this crazy grind, so the whole project was just about capturing that fleeting feeling.”***You can purchase tickets to The Main Squeeze’s Without A Sound album release show at The Fox Theatre in Boulder on April 28th here.***So far, the band has released three singles from Without A Sound: the highway-cruising “405,” the heavy rocking “Get At Me,” and synth-funk jam “Sweat.” You can listen to all three tracks below via Spotify: Stay tuned on The Main Squeeze’s Facebook page for new single releases each Friday leading up to the Without A Sound tour. For a list of tour dates, head to the band’s website. The Main Squeeze’s new album, Without A Sound will be available worldwide on April 28th. The album is available for pre-order now. Purchase tickets to The Main Squeeze’s album release show on April 28th in Boulder, CO here.[Cover photo via Phierce Photo – Keith Griner]last_img read more

New director of I Tatti

first_imgHarvard Provost Steven E. Hyman announced today (Dec. 16) that Lino Pertile will become director of the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies at Villa I Tatti in Florence, Italy, beginning next summer.Pertile will succeed Joseph Connors, professor of history of art and architecture and I Tatti’s sixth director, who has run the center since 2002. After a sabbatical year, Connors will resume teaching, concentrating on Harvard College courses in Italian art.Pertile said of the announcement: “In the 50 years since Bernard Berenson left it to Harvard, Villa I Tatti has had a unique role in the fostering of Renaissance studies, and I am truly honored to be given the opportunity to join this remarkable institution. I look forward with great enthusiasm to carrying on the outstanding work of Joe Connors and the previous directors.”“I am delighted that Lino has accepted the directorship of Villa I Tatti,” said Hyman. “His academic stature, deep knowledge of the Villa, of Italy more broadly, and experience in creating an inclusive scholarly community all make him ideally suited to take the reins of the center and burnish its status as a global leader in Renaissance studies.” He continued, “I look forward to working with Lino in strengthening the ties between Harvard and I Tatti, and developing the center in the years to come.”Pertile, the Carl A. Pescosolido Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, is a renowned scholar on Italian literature, with a particular focus on the medieval and Renaissance periods. He has taught numerous courses at Harvard College, including, since 1998, the popular “Dante’s Divine Comedy and Its World.”Pertile’s commitment to undergraduate teaching and advising earned him the award of Harvard College Professor in 2005. Since 2000, Pertile has served as master of Eliot House along with his wife, Anna Bensted. Pertile and Bensted are widely credited with creating a warm and welcoming atmosphere at Eliot.Connors said of the announcement: “Lino’s distinguished career as a scholar of Dante and Petrarch — spanning the Italian and Anglo-Saxon worlds of learning — is the true embodiment of what Villa I Tatti is all about, and I couldn’t be more pleased with his appointment. The future of I Tatti under Lino’s leadership looks very bright indeed.”Connors took over I Tatti after serving as chair of the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. From 1988 to 1992 he served as director of the American Academy in Rome.“Joseph Connors leaves a superb foundation on which Lino Pertile will continue to build,” said Hyman. “Joe’s model stewardship has transformed the Villa — academically and physically — and he leaves behind a robust center of which Harvard can be proud. We are deeply grateful for his leadership.”Villa I Tatti was founded in 1961 around the house and library of the art critic and connoisseur Bernard Berenson (Class of 1887). It covers 75 acres near Florence, employs a staff of 50, and consists of a fellowship program in Renaissance studies and the Biblioteca Berenson, a research library with distinguished collections in art history, history, literature, and early music, as well as an extensive photographic collection. I Tatti is also known for its historic garden and working farm, and a notable collection of early Italian and Asian art.last_img read more

2013 Long Island Press Power List

first_imgThe process of selecting honorees for the Power List is so highly secretive even the NSA doesn’t know who’s on it until it comes out. Okay, that’s probably not true. The point is we typically play it pretty close to the vest.The Power List issue has particular meaning to the Press staff as it was actually our debut issue in 2003. Although we began publishing bi-weekly as The Island Ear in 2002, the Power List in January of 2003 was our official start in the alternative publishing world. From the beginning we sought to identify the people who impacted life on Long Island and shaped its image. From our first introductory editorial in 2003:“We were looking for more than mere celebrity or financial clout. We wanted those who made the most of their resources, whatever those resources were. We tended to reject those who held big titles but used them to little effect… We insisted on real Long Islanders, not pseudo-Islanders with country homes in the Hamptons.”The original list included lesser-known figures like independent music promoter Christian McKnight and DOT acting director Tom Oelerich, alongside highly visible and prominent leaders such as former Senator Alfonse D’Amato and New York Islanders owner Charles Wang. Topping the list that year (as his son James would in later years) was Cablevision founder Charles Dolan. And even though Robert Moses was deceased for more than two decades, we even put him on the list. (We have since revised this policy. Only the living may appear.)Our strategy hasn’t changed much, and—for better or for worse—neither has many of the names. Therefore, in order to prevent the list from becoming stale with perennial “Power Listers,” we created the Power List Hall of Fame for individuals who made the list five times. It’s like raising a star athlete’s jersey to the rafters. But instead of a jersey, we commission a caricature likeness of this individual that is sometimes flattering and sometimes, well, not so much.Coming into this year, however, we faced a problem. There were so many Power List Hall of Famers continuing to expand his or her influence that it has grown increasingly difficult to exclude them. After many intense negotiations, (i.e. a couple of beers) the Press decided upon a significant rule change. From this point forward Hall of Famers will once again be considered for selection among their peers with the exception of those who are being inducted within the year.It’s important to understand when considering this list as a whole that it is not a wish list but a mirror. Every year we point out that the list is predominantly filled with white men. Once again, 2013 offers no exception.It is, however, interesting to note that the composition of this year’s list might be looked at as somewhat of a bellwether with respect to our economy. There is broad representation of the healthcare field from research and technology to hospitals and advocacy. As usual, there are far too many political people on the list and still more who are likely incredulous that they were not included. But this too is a reflection of Long Island, a place where politics is inseparable from daily life.Lastly, a note on our editorial prerogative. Every year there are a few people who had the power to inspire this newspaper. Take, for example, Andy Stepanian, who embodies activism and speaks truth to power so softly it humbles the most outspoken among us. Or Gerard Depascale and Liam Neville, who took on a giant to shine light in the darkness and clear a path for others to follow. They lost their battle but won our hearts. Theirs are the stories we ache to tell throughout the year and we thank them for allowing us to do so.For all those who are reading this issue and wondering whether or not your name will ever appear on the Power List, a few words to the wise: Those who lobby for inclusion on the list never make it. (We’re petty like that.) Also, substance wins over style.Enjoy the list.Jed MoreyLong Island Press PublisherCLICK THE IMAGE TO VIEW THE 2013 LONG ISLAND PRESS POWER LIST Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen in no hurry to see MLB speed up pace of play

first_img Dodgers enter 2018 motivated to avenge World Series disappointment Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is not a big fan of the proposed rules changes.“Football is four hours, 4 ½ hours,” Jansen said. “The Super Bowl was five hours. Baseball fans are not going to stop watching because the game is too long. Let’s stop that. I think that’s ridiculous.”Jansen blamed the length of games on the way hitting approaches have changed and the number of pitchers pushed to the big leagues before they have learned to throw more than one or two pitches for strikes.“Hitters are different now, because there’s no contact hitters anymore,” Jansen said. “Everybody wants to swing for the fences all the time. There’s a lot more strikeouts. And a lot of walks because pitchers don’t command now. … If pitchers can’t command their secondary pitches, the game is going to be long.”Jansen will be taking his time this spring. The Dodgers closer was one of the pitchers who threw bullpen sessions during Wednesday’s first official workout. But he will be eased into things this spring and won’t pitch often in Cactus League games as a nod to his expanded workload during the Dodgers’ playoff runs the past two years. TOLES PLANIt has been nearly nine months since Andrew Toles underwent surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee and the Dodgers outfielder said he is working out without any limitations. He is expected to be ready to participate when Cactus League games start next week but Roberts said Toles might be held back “a tick” but won’t be “far behind the rest of the group.”“The medical staff wants to really take it a little bit slower and be methodical about it – which is smart,” Roberts said.Once games start in the minor-league camp, Toles might get playing time there to accumulate at-bats, Roberts said. Toles said he doesn’t know how things will play out this spring.“I can’t predict the future,” he said. “We’ll have to see.” GLENDALE, Ariz. – MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has made it clear that he wants to shorten the length of games and is willing to make significant rules changes (like a 20-second pitch clock and limitations on mound visits) to do so.So far, the players and their union have not been willing to go along with the proposed changes, and Manfred has not followed through on threats to unilaterally implement the new rules.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said he expects there to be “some finality” on whether any changes will go into effect for this season before the start of preseason games next week.“If it does happen, it’s going to happen before games start,” Roberts said. “As I understand it, there’s dialogue and before games start here there will be some finality.” Dodgers key spring training dates Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers’ Matt Kemp has some explaining to do about ‘baseball town’ remark WHY DARVISH MATH DIDN’T ADD UPThough the Dodgers never closed the door on re-signing Yu Darvish until the right-hander agreed on a contract with the Chicago Cubs last week, Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman acknowledged that it would have been difficult for the Dodgers to sign him and still maintain their primary goal this offseason – keeping this year’s payroll under the competitive-balance tax threshold.“We knew that it was going to require a ‘Triple Lindy’ of sorts,” Friedman said. “So any time that’s a factor it just reduces the chances. It was more a situation that if it had been distressed enough, just a weird market in terms of how it played out, there could potentially be a scenario. But he ended up doing very well for himself, rightfully so, and we wish him nothing but the best.”Darvish signed a six-year, $126 million deal with the Cubs.TIMMY TIMEFriedman confirmed that the Dodgers will have a representative scouting Tim Lincecum at the two-time Cy Young Award winner’s showcase in the Seattle area Thursday.Lincecum, 33, has not pitched since going 2-6 with a 9.16 ERA in nine starts for the Angels in 2016. He has been working at Driveline Baseball in suburban Seattle this offseason with an eye towards making a comeback. The Dodgers have had a relationship with Driveline in the past, sending pitching prospects to the academy that uses data-driven technology to enhance velocity and refine pitching mechanics.At least a dozen teams are expected to have scouts at Lincecum’s workout.Related Articles Matt Kemp ready for his unexpected reunion tour with Dodgers last_img read more