Peanut research

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaAt its March board meeting, the Georgia Peanut Commission awarded $1 million to peanut researchers in Georgia, including $959,000 to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The money will provide research for economics, conservation methods, irrigation and water management, peanut breeding for higher yield and improved quality, pests, weed and disease management and allergen-free peanuts. “Peanut growers are pleased to provide this money to support the research and education that has continued to demonstrate a return on our investment,” said Donald Chase, Macon County farmer and GPC research committee chairman.“Georgia Peanut Commission’s support continues to fuel the college’s research for this most important Georgia commodity. And helps us provide the unbiased information Georgia growers need to stay competitive and lead the country in high-quality peanut production,” said J. Scott Angle, UGA CAES dean and director.The money comes from growers, combined with funding from the National Peanut Board. Since 1962, Georgia growers have invested more than $17 million in research with nearly $10 million of that amount coming in the last 12 years. “Past research and technological advancements have been the silver lining that kept us ahead of the curve in maintaining superior quality, a competitive position and increased consumption in the world’s marketplace,” Chase said. “Much technological advancement is on the horizon, and we embrace the future with excitement and confidence.”GPC also presented $101,000 to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service in Tifton, Ga.last_img read more

One-day outdoor hockey competition billed for National stadium today

first_imgSEVEN male teams and five female sides will battle from this morning in a one-day outdoor hockey competition at the Guyana National Stadium, Providence.Twenty-five games will be played simultaneously on two pitches in the Bounty and Antonio’s Grille-sponsored event.GCC will field three teams: GBTI GCC Tigers, GBTI GCC Spice and GBTI GCC Spartans. The other female sides expected to compete are Saints and YMCA Old Fort.In the male competition, GCC, Saints and YMCA will all have two teams, while the Hikers will field one. The men’s group is split into two groups. Group A includes: Bounty GCC The Sequel, Saints Splinters, YMCA Old Fort Warriors and Pepsi Hikers, while Group B will have Bounty GCC Pitbulls, Saints Savages and YMCA Old Fort Carriers.The day’s action bullies off with the Old Fort Warriors tackling the Saints Splinters at 11:30hrs, before the females take to the field 25 minutes later with the GCC Spice tackling Saints on pitch one and Spartans meeting Old Fort on pitch two.The teams (both males and females) will continue battling throughout the afternoon until they play the semi-finals from 15:40hrs.The men’s final is scheduled for 16:30hrs, while the female final is scheduled for 16:55hrs.last_img read more

Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen in no hurry to see MLB speed up pace of play

first_img Dodgers enter 2018 motivated to avenge World Series disappointment Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is not a big fan of the proposed rules changes.“Football is four hours, 4 ½ hours,” Jansen said. “The Super Bowl was five hours. Baseball fans are not going to stop watching because the game is too long. Let’s stop that. I think that’s ridiculous.”Jansen blamed the length of games on the way hitting approaches have changed and the number of pitchers pushed to the big leagues before they have learned to throw more than one or two pitches for strikes.“Hitters are different now, because there’s no contact hitters anymore,” Jansen said. “Everybody wants to swing for the fences all the time. There’s a lot more strikeouts. And a lot of walks because pitchers don’t command now. … If pitchers can’t command their secondary pitches, the game is going to be long.”Jansen will be taking his time this spring. The Dodgers closer was one of the pitchers who threw bullpen sessions during Wednesday’s first official workout. But he will be eased into things this spring and won’t pitch often in Cactus League games as a nod to his expanded workload during the Dodgers’ playoff runs the past two years. TOLES PLANIt has been nearly nine months since Andrew Toles underwent surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee and the Dodgers outfielder said he is working out without any limitations. He is expected to be ready to participate when Cactus League games start next week but Roberts said Toles might be held back “a tick” but won’t be “far behind the rest of the group.”“The medical staff wants to really take it a little bit slower and be methodical about it – which is smart,” Roberts said.Once games start in the minor-league camp, Toles might get playing time there to accumulate at-bats, Roberts said. Toles said he doesn’t know how things will play out this spring.“I can’t predict the future,” he said. “We’ll have to see.” GLENDALE, Ariz. – MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has made it clear that he wants to shorten the length of games and is willing to make significant rules changes (like a 20-second pitch clock and limitations on mound visits) to do so.So far, the players and their union have not been willing to go along with the proposed changes, and Manfred has not followed through on threats to unilaterally implement the new rules.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said he expects there to be “some finality” on whether any changes will go into effect for this season before the start of preseason games next week.“If it does happen, it’s going to happen before games start,” Roberts said. “As I understand it, there’s dialogue and before games start here there will be some finality.” Dodgers key spring training dates Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Dodgers’ Matt Kemp has some explaining to do about ‘baseball town’ remark WHY DARVISH MATH DIDN’T ADD UPThough the Dodgers never closed the door on re-signing Yu Darvish until the right-hander agreed on a contract with the Chicago Cubs last week, Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman acknowledged that it would have been difficult for the Dodgers to sign him and still maintain their primary goal this offseason – keeping this year’s payroll under the competitive-balance tax threshold.“We knew that it was going to require a ‘Triple Lindy’ of sorts,” Friedman said. “So any time that’s a factor it just reduces the chances. It was more a situation that if it had been distressed enough, just a weird market in terms of how it played out, there could potentially be a scenario. But he ended up doing very well for himself, rightfully so, and we wish him nothing but the best.”Darvish signed a six-year, $126 million deal with the Cubs.TIMMY TIMEFriedman confirmed that the Dodgers will have a representative scouting Tim Lincecum at the two-time Cy Young Award winner’s showcase in the Seattle area Thursday.Lincecum, 33, has not pitched since going 2-6 with a 9.16 ERA in nine starts for the Angels in 2016. He has been working at Driveline Baseball in suburban Seattle this offseason with an eye towards making a comeback. The Dodgers have had a relationship with Driveline in the past, sending pitching prospects to the academy that uses data-driven technology to enhance velocity and refine pitching mechanics.At least a dozen teams are expected to have scouts at Lincecum’s workout.Related Articles Matt Kemp ready for his unexpected reunion tour with Dodgers last_img read more