Morning after the Boogie Night before

first_imgThere’s no doubt about it; John Holmes was big. He made over 2,000 films during his career and, aided in no small way by his prodigious appendage (the exact stature of which, Cherwell cannot divulge) became porn’s first superstar during the industry’s seventies heyday. Not bad for a skinny guy from Ohio, with a crap moustache and a dodgy lung. Predictably, though, this fame was fleeting, and the beginning of the eighties found him washed up. An impressive pharmaceutical intake took its toll and, as past, present and future disappeared up his nose, Holmes became increasingly reliant on the wrong kind of people. James Cox’s film takes up the story of his life here, in 1981, eschewing the dubious past glories to focus instead on the one-time king of the adult movie world’s involvement in the brutal murders of four people at a house on Wonderland Avenue. His precise role in the slayings never came to light; whether an active participant or an unlucky dupe, Holmes was acquitted, and never revealed the truth. As such, Wonderland employs a Rashomon-esque approach, exploring the various possibilities by taking separate looks at conflicting versions of the story, all with the flashy editing and grungy hues seemingly obligatory for any film depicting drug-fuelled depravity. It’s not so much gritty as soiled, the world inhabited by the burntout skin flick star revealed in all its scuzzy glory, and though we do occasionally see a more human side to the man – the strange triangle formed by him, his wife and his much younger girlfriend is one of the most interesting, if underdeveloped, parts of the story – this comes second to his portrayal as a cowardly, desperate fuck-up. Wonderland relies to a great extent on Val Kilmer’s performance, imbuing his seemingly worthless character with enough faded charm to suggest that there may be varying levels of truth. The real John Holmes was a mass of contradictions – a vociferous campaigner for mandatory AIDS testing in his industry, he nevertheless continued to make films despite learning he had the disease – so perhaps it’s only right that here we are left with questions rather than answers, both about events on Wonderland Avenue and the nature of the man himself. Naïve victim or craven manipulator, it’s difficult to know, and though this lack of conclusion does leave an empty feeling, it seems in keeping with the subject that all should remain largely mysterious.ARCHIVE: 2nd week TT 2004last_img read more

St Anne’s and Christ Church launch Aim for Oxford scheme in the North-East

first_imgThe Aim for Access programme was initiated in September, and a statement from Christ Church said at the time: “The North East of Eng- land is the most under-represented region at Oxford, and we believe deeply that diversity is essential to the flourishing of a lively academic community and to Oxford’s future as a hub of social mobility and intellectual exchange. Geographical The North East has traditionally been one of the most poorly represented areas at Oxford – according to the University’s own statistics, the region contributed only 2.1% of the 7,470 students admitted between 2016 and 2018. The launch took place at New- castle Sixth Form College, a coeducational college in the middle of the city. diversity is something Oxford needsto continue to work on and we areexcited to be part of that throughAim for Oxford”. St Anne’s launched its “new sustained outreach program” Aim for Oxford alongside Christ Church on Saturday. Up to 40 students will be assistedfrom the beginning of sixth form,throughout the application processand up to their arrival at Oxford.The College has specified that theinitiative is aimed at economicallydisadvantaged students and thosefrom underrepresented groups,alongside strong academic results atGCSE.center_img Meanwhile, Christ Church’s outreach team visited schools south of the River Tyne, talking to Year 12s at Hetton School in Sunderland as well as younger students at Jarrow School, near South Shields, before heading north to King’s Priory School in Tynemouth, displaying the College’s ambition to forge concrete links across the region. In her opening address, St Anne’sprincipal Helen King explained that“you’re only the best if you attractthe brightest talent [and] the hard-est working people to you.” Theprogram aims to forge stronger tiesbetween the University and areato establish a clearer pathway forapplicants who may otherwise nothave applied. The scheme is aimed at emboldening students attending North East state schools to apply to Oxford, bridging what has typically been a large divide between one of England’s most economically disadvantaged areas and one of its most vaunted academic institutions. Beyond this, Christ Church has also advertised a History Competition open specifically to North-Eastern state school students. The competition is focused upon oral history, asking applicants to “conduct an interview with a member of their local community about their experiences of migration. They should then submit a short essay, summarising their findings.” A number of applicants will then be chosen to discuss their project with an Oxford historian. last_img read more

CHANNEL 44 NEWS

first_imgSouth Side Family Marches To End Senseless KillingsOCTOBER 9TH, 2016 WILLIAM WOLKOFF EVANSVILLE, INDIANA An Evansville family is marching to put an end to senseless killings.  Brian Jackson was shot and killed five years ago today, And the person responsible was never found.Evansville’s south side was roaring with music for most of the afternoon, as family and friends marched through the streets in Jackson’s honor.  However, they say Sunday’s march is just the beginning of a new movement.Tri-State Organizations Show Off, Make Statements In Annual Fall Festival ParadeOCTOBER 8TH, 2016 WILLIAM WOLKOFF EVANSVILLE, INDIANA We all know here in Evansville the main parade at the Fall Festival is the big kahuna. Those participating and watching say, this years parade did not disappoint.100 floats, and a plethora of organizations put on a show for the Tri-State .  However, some organizations say, their float made a statement.Don Mattingly will donate $25,000 to Evansville’s Challenger Baseball League SundayOCTOBER 8TH, 2016JOJO GENTRY EVANSVILLE, INDIANA Now that the Miami Marlins season has come to a close for the year, Evansville’s Don Mattingly has returned to his hometown to give back to the Tri-state community alongside Mattingly Charities, a non-profit he founded to support underprivileged youth providing equipment and funding for sports and other development activities.Don and his wife, Lori, will present a $25,000 check on behalf of Mattingly Charities to Evansville’s Highland Challenger Baseball League at Challenger Field Sunday at 1 p.m. 44News will air coverage of the event Sunday at 9 and 10 p.m.The second annual “An Intimate Evening with Friends” is scheduled for Nov. 30 at the Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science located on Riverside Drive. Baseball Hall of Famer and four-time World Champion, Joe Torre, will be the special guest for the fundraising event. Last year’s guests included Albert Pujols and Toby Keith.Individual general tickets cost $150 per person. Individual VIP reception tickets cost $300 per person. VIP ticket purchasers will have time to take pictures with Don, Torre, and The Warren Brothers in a private setting. Ticket purchases are availablehere through Nov. 16.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Concord Community Schools announces back to school plan

first_img Pinterest Google+ Pinterest Facebook Twitter Previous articleElkhart officer recovering from surgery after last week’s attackNext articleOne facing charges after fatal crash in Niles Wednesday Brooklyne Beatty Concord Community Schools announces back to school plan WhatsApp (Photo Supplied/Concord Community Schools) Concord Community Schools has released its reopening plan for the 2020-21 school year.School officials announced this week the district will reopen on August 12.50 percent of students will go to class on Mondays and Wednesdays, with virtual learning on Tuesdays and Thursdays.The other 50 percent of students will have the opposite schedule.ABC 57 News also reports online learning is still available for high risk students, or who have family members at high risk, as well as for students who don’t feel comfortable returning to class.Students and staff will be required to wear face coverings and social distance.center_img By Brooklyne Beatty – July 22, 2020 0 383 Facebook TAGS20/202021August 12back to schoolConcord Community SchoolscoronavirusCOVID-19fall Google+ IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

Watch This 17-Year-Old Bad Ass Play With Los Lobos In Chicago

first_imgLos Lobos are currently on tour, welcoming special guests to share the stage from city to city. After a four-night stand at City Winery Chicago, the band made it over to SPACE in Evanston where seventeen-year-old Althea Grace made quite the impression. Thea is one half of the duo Future Stuff, who can only be described as Tedeschi Trucks Band meets The White Stripes meets Shakey Graves. So when the young singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist took the stage, fans of Lobos were pleasantly pleased with the in-your-face indie blues that the young woman had to offer.The not-yet-old-enough-to-drive show-stopper led the band through KoKo Taylor‘s “Voodoo Woman”, a song choice inspired by the cover that Susan Tedeschi performs. (Also note the Derek Trucks red Gibson SG). Thea first played with Lobos when she was eight-years-old, so to see how far she’s come since then was a treat for all.Thea and her band Future Stuff have a lot to be excited about, including an upcoming tour to be announced in the coming weeks. Check them out here, and enjoy the video below:[Photo by Edward Spinelli]last_img read more

DelFest 2018 Adds Greensky Bluegrass, David Grisman’s Dawg Trio, Infamous Stringdusters, & More

first_imgAfter announcing its initial lineup in mid-December, DelFest has just announced a number of additions to its 2018 lineup. Additions to DelFest 2018, which will take place from May 24th through 27th at Cumberland, Maryland’s Allegany County Fairgrounds, include Greensky Bluegrass, The Dawg Trio with David Grisman, Danny Barnes, & Sam Grisman, Richard Thompson, The Infamous Stringdusters, Mandolin Orange, The California Honeydrops, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades, The New Orleans Suspects, Grass Is Dead, and more.These artists join a bill with The Del McCoury Band, The Travelin’ McCourys, The Bluegrass Congress (featuring The Del McCoury Band, David Grisman, Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush, Bela Fleck, Jerry Douglas, Bryan Sutton, and Stuart Duncan), Old Crow Medicine Show, Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, Sam Bush, The Jerry Douglas Band, The Wood Brothers, Fruition, and others.You can take a look at the fully updated lineup below, and head over to the event’s website for more information and ticketing.last_img read more

Helping teachers learn

first_imgFive years ago, Houston elementary school administrator Christian Stevenson Winn attended her first Project Zero Classroom, the annual summer conference at Harvard that helps teachers learn innovative educational practices and become better educators.Winn, who is the elementary assistant principal at the T.H. Rogers School, not only learned new strategies to engage students, but she also gained a chance to reflect on her professional practice and explore dilemmas and challenges educators face in their daily work.“Professionally, it was a life-changing experience,” said Winn, whose school is among Houston’s top 10 elementary schools. “Project Zero Classroom gives you the opportunity to develop your own questions around teaching and learning that present a challenge for you. It could be around curriculum, pedagogy, or a professional aspiration that you want to dive into to improve and grow.”Inspired by that first conference, Winn created the Houston Learning Network to share some of the lessons learned at Project Zero Classroom. She said one of the innovations that teachers have put in practice has been to open their classrooms to colleagues so they can visit, observe, and provide feedback.Winn will attend this year’s program as a study group leader, joining more than 360 educators who have signed up to participate. It will be held July 22‒26.Since it was founded 23 years ago under the umbrella of Project Zero, an influential, research-based project at the Graduate School of Education (GSE), Project Zero Classroom has drawn more than 7,000 educators from all over the world.It’s not a typical conference, said Daniel Gray Wilson, director and principal investigator of Project Zero Classroom. Participants learn about the latest research studies in the field of education conducted by more than 30 Project Zero researchers studying key questions such as how teachers can design learning experiences that unleash students’ full potential, how to help students become complex thinkers, and how schools can personalize learning for a diverse student body.“We want to create a learning community for teachers, where they can learn about the latest educational research and learn from one another,” said Wilson. “The program operates at two levels: First there is a deep conceptual shift in the assumption about what it means for humans to learn and think, and then there’s the practical level about tools, practices, and tips they learn to support learning and thinking.”Wilson said one of the new strategies teachers learn involves finding ways to help students move beyond rote memorization. For example, if a class is learning history, students may be asked to write a musical piece or an essay comparing a historical event to a current one.“In today’s world, memorization is less and less important,” he said. “It’s about using that knowledge or information in responsible and critical ways. Educators are faced with the challenge of how to no longer just simply be the person who’s transmitting information and instead be the curator of a more creative application of information.”,The program has 100 faculty conducting workshops, study groups, and lectures. A key component is the small study groups in which participants discuss cutting-edge educational concepts such as teaching for better understanding, making learning visible, and developing the motivation and skills to help students think critically.One of the goals of the small discussions is to help participants ponder strategies to put the new ideas in practice, said Wilson. “One of the key questions when they go back home is how they can support each other,” he said. “In many cases, it’ll be very hard to change the practices, the beliefs, and the cultures of schools. Often, educators come in groups so when they go home, they’re not going home alone. They’re going home with support from other colleagues.”At T.H. Rogers School, which has sent 35 teachers and administrators to the summer program in recent years with financial support from the Harvard Club of Houston, the changes have been noticeable, said Winn. The participating teachers are always eager to practice what they learn and use their classrooms as laboratories.In early May, Harvard President Larry Bacow met with teachers and administrators from T.H. Rogers during a tour of the southwest.For Winn, the relationship between her school and Harvard has been instrumental. T.H. Rogers serves both gifted and multiply impaired students, including the deaf and hard of hearing, and a culturallydiverse student population of nearly 1,000, with a breakdown of 47 percent Asian, 21 percent Hispanic, 15 percent white, 13 percent African American, and 4 percent multiracial.Most of the students are high performers, but Winn said her goal and that of her teachers is to help them become “complex thinkers in all kind of areas.” It’s a job that is never-ending, she said.“Project Zero is a pivotal learning experience that promotes exploration, risk-taking, and the idea that you’re never there,” said Winn. “As educators, we’re always in a constant quest to find new ways to better meet the needs of the kids who sit in front of us.”last_img read more

Students volunteer at Ted Cruz rally

first_imgJust five days before the Indiana presidential primaries, Ted Cruz paid a visit to South Bend to rally voters in pursuit of a crucial win in the race for the Republican nomination.Junior Dylan Stevenson, who attended the rally for the Texas senator at the Century Center on Thursday, said the place was “buzzing” with excitement and enthusiasm.“You had elderly people there, people with families,” Stevenson, vice president of College Republicans, said. “You had men and women, people of all shapes and sizes. It was a really diverse group. I’m guessing there were several principles that united the crowd, but if you were to see these people wandering around the store, you wouldn’t think they necessarily were to share political beliefs.”Fresh off a series of losses on the East Coast, Cruz seeks to defeat frontrunner Donald Trump in what has been deemed a deciding state primary by analysts. If Trump wins Indiana, he will likely secure the 1,237 votes needed the win the Republican delegate majority.Freshman Isabel Teixeira said Cruz discussed the unusual amount of power and responsibility held by Hoosier voters, as the Indiana primaries are often held too late to have a significant effect on national level.“The fact that Indiana is such a big deal this year shows what a weird election this is and what a divided election it is,” she said.Teixeira and freshman Lizzie Cameron said their biggest reason for attending the rally was to see Carly Fiorina in one of her first public appearances since being named Cruz’s running mate this past Wednesday.“There’s no one I really feel strongly about voting for, so we decided to go check out Cruz to see what he’s like,” Cameron said. “I like Carly a lot, and she talked about how close [she and Cruz] have grown and how he’s a really good, hardworking guy.”Cruz’s speech was catered for an Indiana audience and focused on three main points — jobs and wages, freedom and security, sophomore John Kill said.“At the moment, he was speaking to people in South Bend, but I think his audience at large was the people of Indiana,” he said. “The points he spoke to are the things Indiana conservatives, generally really care about and want to protect.”Junior Pat Crane, president of College Republicans, said Cruz put an emphasis Indiana jobs, particularly manufacturing jobs, which are being outsourced to other countries.“Touching on what really has been Trump’s line this whole time, we really want to bring these jobs back,” he said. “He was laying out an effective strategy for that.”In terms of freedom, Crane said Cruz promoted a return to a “Constitutional outlook” on life. Cruz also touched on religious liberty, a relevant topic in light of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed in 2015, Kill said.Stevenson said the senator looks to increase and strengthen national security in line with typical Republican platforms.“He’s going to rebuild the military so it’s not depleted, so it can take on radical Islam,” he said. “It’s a peace through strength sort of strategy.”Kill said Cruz made a point to differentiate himself as the “true conservative” candidate.“Not only did he say Donald Trump wasn’t a conservative, but he said he was just the masculine version of Hilary Clinton,” Kill said.“I think that was his point — not just to the people in South Bend that were there, but to his general audience in Indiana — that look, you know, the election is coming down to here,” he said. “You’re either going to vote for me, or you’re going to vote for Donald Trump. And a vote for Donald Trump is basically a vote for Hilary Clinton.”Kill plans to intern for the Texas senator this summer in his Houston office. Although he will not be involved in the campaign process, Kill said he will support Cruz in the presidential race.“I resonate with a lot of the things he said. … He’s a good family man, comes from a background that shows the importance of hard work and dedication to your family, to your country, to values and principles that I support,” he said.Stevenson said roughly 25 College Republicans members volunteered at the rally.“The energy was great. People started chanting ‘Ted’ part-way through,” he said. “There was really good energy, just overall a really good event. I don’t know what the Trump event will be like, but it’ll be tough to top that.”Cruz is not the only candidate targeting South Bend — Bernie Sanders will host a rally at Century Center on Sunday, while Trump is set to visit the same location Monday.Crane said he hopes to get a similar Notre Dame crowd for the Trump campaign.“That volunteer work is something we want to keep up, whether or not the nominee is Cruz,” he said. “You know, either way, we really want to support the nominee.”Kill said the University’s political atmosphere is sure to provide a stimulating forum for students as the 2016 election draws nearer.“Being here at Notre Dame, the combination of being Catholic and being millennials, that whole mix of things makes it a very interesting political climate. We’re not a left-leaning school, we’re not a right-leaning school — we’re somewhere in the middle,” he said.Associate News Editor Rachel O’Grady contributed to this story.Tags: 2016 Election, Indiana primary, Ted Cruz, Ted Cruz rallylast_img read more

SMC students host Hypatia Day to encourage STEM participation

first_imgSaint Mary’s will emphasize feminism in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields this Saturday with Hypatia Day. Named after the Greek mathematician, astronomer and philosopher Hypatia, the conference takes place to encourage young girls in seventh and eighth grades interested in participating in STEM fields.Associate professor of mathematics and computer science Kristin Kuter said the day is meant to interest more young women in STEM fields before they enter high school.“The goal is to encourage these girls to continue to study STEM and to pursue an education in STEM,” Kuter said.These girls will participate with Saint Mary’s students in activities in the fields in which they are interested. The chemistry, biology, physics, math, computer science, engineering and nursing clubs will host sessions with the girls, teaching them new things and giving demonstrations.The day will start with a speech from keynote speaker Laura Kloepper, assistant biology professor. Kloepper said she wants to inspire younger girls to be in science.“I like to get other people excited, not just about my work, but about science in general too,” Kloepper said.After the speech, the girls will go to sessions and demonstrations in their chosen fields.The biology club will help its participants to extract DNA from strawberries and put the DNA in necklaces.“All the students can go home wearing a necklace of strawberry DNA,” Kloepper said.Senior biology major Stephanie Dreessen said the club will also have the students examine and dissect preserved specimens.“We have a sheep heart, some crayfish, [we’ll] look at differences of a turtle that lives on land verses water, some owls,” Dreessen said. “And we’re also looking at some genetic base stuff, such as fruit flies, seeing some differences underneath a microscope.”According to senior nursing major Tyler Booth, the girls attending the nursing session will learn a lot of nursing practices, including bandaging and taking vitals.“We’re teaching them how to wrap legs and arms,” Booth said, “We’re teaching them how to take pulses, blood pressures. We’re teaching them how to listen to heart sounds and lung sounds on our medi-man.”Junior physics and applied math major Rachel Bonek said the physics club will teach its students projectile motion with a mini-cannonball demonstration.“They can calculate how far it’s going to go based on the angle in the force we put behind it,” Bonek said. “It should be fun.”One of the events of the day focuses on talking to parents about how to encourage their daughters who are interested in science.“We talk about the academic preparation and development of the daughters,” Kuter said.Senior biology major Cassie Libbing will be on the student panel, made up of STEM majors, which will answer parents’ questions about education and how to support their daughters.“Just by sharing experience, I think it gives them a better vision of what it might come to be for their daughters and also see the variety of paths you can take within the STEM area,” Libbing said.For the event, almost as many Saint Mary’s students will volunteer as there are girls that attend. Kuter said this can influence the visiting girls by showing how many female college students are pursing majors in STEM fields.“These middle schoolers really do get to see a lot of examples of the possibilities and what the potential is with these undergraduate Saint Mary’s students,” Kuter said.Part of Hypatia Day’s goal is to reach out to girls in this age group to keep them from dropping their interest in the sciences, and Kuter said the impact of the day should keep these girls interested in science.“Research has shown that that is the age when girls start pulling away from the STEM fields,” Kuter said. “That transition is key in order to keep women engaged within the STEM fields.”Kloepper said Saint Mary’s, as an all-women’s college, facilitates a connection between its students and young girls interested in the sciences through events like Hypatia Day.“It’s nice that we have this opportunity to reach out to them and kind of say, ‘No, stick with it, it’s an amazing career path,’” Kloepper said.Booth said she personally felt this impact when she was in middle school.“I felt I was very English-y and liked writing, and I wasn’t really interested in sciences because I thought that was something only boys did,” Booth said. “So I think it’s important to inspire them and show them that it’s something they can do too.”Tags: Hypatia Day, science, STEMlast_img read more

$36.4 million in business financing approved by VEDA

first_img-30- The Vermont Economic Development Authority (VEDA) has approved $36.4 million in economic development financing assistance for a variety of large and small business projects. The financing support will leverage additional private investment, generating a total of $104.6 million in economic activity throughout Vermont.“VEDA is pleased to offer loan and other financing support to a number of commercial, renewable energy, small business, educational and agricultural initiatives,” said Jo Bradley, VEDA’s Chief Executive Officer. “These projects will bring jobs to Vermonters, and help stimulate Vermont’s economy.”Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) federal stimulus funds, VEDA approved the following Recovery Zone Facility Bond issuance:· Green Mountain Power, Colchester – Green Mountain Power received final approval for $25 million in Recovery Zone Facility Bond (RZF) financing support from VEDA. The special facility bonds, which received preliminary approval from VEDA in January, utilize federal tax exemptions provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Green Mountain Power also received final Authority approval for an additional $5 million in taxable bonds to support expenditures planned for the following year. Green Mountain Power plans over the next two years to undertake numerous large capital projects throughout Chittenden, Addison, Caledonia, Washington, Windham, and Windsor counties. Projects include substation upgrades, renewable energy deployment, hydro-dam refurbishing, and reliability and transmission projects. Total project costs are anticipated to be $31.7 million in 2010, and an additional $46.6 million in capital expenditures in 2011. Green Mountain Power serves 122 Vermont communities across nine counties in the state. The electric utility employs 191 persons, a number expected to grow modestly within three years, due in part to these projects.Other bond financing approved by VEDA:· Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc., Brattleboro – Final approval was given for issuance of $3 million in tax-exempt industrial revenue bond financing to support the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing’s extensive energy conservation upgrades at the Brattleboro campus, and their refinance of existing debt from prior renovations. Originally established in 1904 as the Austine School, the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. now provides comprehensive educational and support services through several programs to deaf and hard of hearing children, adults, and families throughout Vermont and surrounding states. The school’s campus consists of multiple school and dormitory buildings on approximately 174 acres of land. The school employs 201 persons, a number expected to grow to 229 within three years of the project.Among the projects approved by VEDA to receive direct loan assistance:· Vermont Biomass Energy Company, Island Pond – Financing of $1.3 million was approved to the Vermont Biomass Energy Company to support the planned construction and operation of a wood pellet manufacturing facility in Island Pond. The $18.8 million project will convert the 80,000 square foot former Ethan Allen furniture manufacturing facility in Island Pond into a production plant. Community National Bank has approved a $10 million loan for the project, to be secured by a USDA Rural Development guarantee. In addition, the Township of Brighton will be submitting an application for $1 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for the project. Employment projections at the new manufacturing plant over three years are 34 jobs, with estimates that another 120 indirect jobs may be created as a result of the project.· Sugarsnap, Burlington – Financing of $75,000 was approved to support the expansion plans of Sugarsnap, a small fresh food farm and retail operation located on Riverside Avenue in Burlington. Opportunities Credit Union is also participating in the project, which will enable Sugarsnap to develop and outfit a production kitchen and office to serve additional retail locations planned within the next several years. Sugarsnap employs 7 persons, a number expected to grow to 21 within three years of the project.· Flex-A-Seal, Essex Junction – VEDA approved a $51,176 loan as part of a $127,939 machinery and equipment acquisition project at Flex-A-Seal, Inc.  The project will enable the company to grow their operations as producers and assemblers of different types of mechanical sealing products. Flex-A-Seal employs 54, a number expected to increase to 63 jobs within three years of the project.Through the Authority’s new Technology Loan Program, designed to assist smaller technology-related firms, VEDA approved $31,500 to Computer Care in Colchester to help the business expand their market area, purchase equipment, and hire additional employees.In addition, VEDA approved:· $1.2 million in financing to Vermont farmers through the Authority’s agricultural loan program, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation (VACC); and· $719,396 to support small business development projects through the Vermont Small Business Loan Program.VEDA’s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.5 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.Source: VEDA. 3.9.2010last_img read more