300 from Region 4 to commence work study

first_img…students urged to use experience from work studySeveral hundred students have completed the 2018 CSEC examination, and 300 of them have been selected to participate in the Region Four Department of Education’s Work Study Programme for 2018, which commences on Monday, June 18, 2018.REDO Tiffany Favourite-Harvey (at left) posing with Secondary Education Officers Loren Park and Carla Prescott-Mathews at (extreme right) from the Department of Education Region Four and work-study studentsActing Reginal Education Officer Tiffany Favourite-Harvey, in her address to the evidently eager students, urged them to use the experience and knowledge gained from the work study attachment to prepare themselves for the world of work.The 300 students would form two phases of students involved in work study, Favourite-Harvey disclosed, and some 46 agencies, organisations and businesses have come on board this programme this year.Favourite-Harvey stressed that it is the largest bunch of students to have ever been involved in the Region Four Work Study Programme. She added that while the average number over the years has been around 140 to 180, this year has seen 300 students coming on board.“While we are cognisant that many of you would be furthering your studies at the University of Guyana and other institutions, it is very important to note that demonstrating critical important qualities is pertinent in securing your dream job, or possibly getting your feet into the world of work. It is on this note that I urge you to inculcate attitudes and qualities that will hold you in good stead”, she told the students, who assembled at the Bladen Hall Multilateral School’s auditorium.The REDO reminded students that participation in the work study programme is no guarantee that the agency or company to which they would be sent would employ them after they would have completed their stint. She stressed that the experience would help the participants to better understand a number of issues that are important in the world of work.“Remember, you are not only representing yourself but, importantly, your school and the Department of Education, Region Four. Whatever you do will either give us praise or create embarrassment for us; so irrespective of how insignificant it may seem, do the right thing always,” she admonished.last_img read more

City hit nine past Burton, cruise towards League Cup final

first_img0Shares0000Cloud nine: Gabriel Jesus (2nd left) scored four of Manchester City’s goals in a 9-0 thrashing of Burton Albion on Wednesday © AFP / Oli SCARFFMANCHESTER, United Kingdom, Jan 10 – Holders Manchester City can look forward to defending the League Cup in next month’s final at Wembley as Gabriel Jesus struck four goals in a 9-0 thrashing of Burton Albion in their semi-final, first leg on Wednesday.Kevin de Bruyne, Oleksandr Zinchenko, Phil Foden, Kyle Walker and Riyad Mahrez were also on target against Nigel Clough’s League One side as City ensured their visit to the Pirelli Stadium on January 23 is a mere formality. “Of course we are already in the final. We have to play second leg and we will take it seriously. Happy to be in the final again,” said City boss Pep Guardiola.“It’s not easy to play this kind of game. We spoke (before the game) to take it seriously, we started well.”After also thrashing Rotherham 7-0 in the FA Cup on Sunday with a much-changed side, Guardiola was able to again hand a rest to a number of his key players but named a strong side with De Bruyne continuing his comeback from injury.And the Belgian set the tone for the evening by heading City into a fifth-minute lead as he timed his run into the box perfectly to head home David Silva’s cross.Clough admitted before the game it would take a “miracle” for Burton to blunt the Premier League champions’ might over two legs.“We didn’t expect anything less given the gulf in class between the teams, we actually feared it could be more,” said Clough, a two-time League Cup winner as a player under his father Brian Clough at Nottingham Forest.“We’ve made history with the club getting to the last four of a Cup competition. Once we saw the three teams (in the semi-finals) it was always going to be trouble.”So it proved, but the visitors missed a glorious chance to get straight back on level terms when Marcus Harness blasted over Lucas Akins’s cross when completely unmarked inside the penalty box.It took City until the half hour mark to double their advantage, but a glut of three goals in seven minutes followed to put the tie to bed before the break.Jesus headed home his first from close range after Bradley Collins had denied Leroy Sane before the Brazilian slotted home Silva’s cushioned pass via the inside of the post.“Players like me want to play more, to help the team, and we went out there to win,” said Jesus.City didn’t need any luck, but still got some when Zinchenko’s intended cross then looped over Collins to make it 4-0.Other sides may have slacked off in the second period, but with competition for places so fierce among Guardiola’s side, the hosts were ruthless to match the Catalan’s biggest ever win as a coach.Jesus powered home a header to complete his second hat-trick of the season.De Bruyne was then replaced by home favourite Foden, who was surprisingly left out the stating XI, just before the hour mark.It took just four minutes for the 18-year-old to score his third City goal as he profited from the rebound after Collins did well to parry Jesus’s first effort.Jesus did soon have his fourth with a delicate finish from Sane’s cross and City’s dominance was summed up when right-back Kyle Walker strode forward to fire home his side’s eighth of the evening.Mahrez made it nine seven minutes from time and those City fans still in the Etihad cried for a historic 10th.But that was the only thing City fell short of on the night with a final meeting against Tottenham or Chelsea on February 24 guaranteed.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Villaraigosa offers $6.7 billion budget

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event“This budget balances the values of public safety while ensuring the future of kids. Living within our means while providing for public safety is what is important.” The budget, which takes effect July 1, is roughly 11 percent higher than the current $6.1 billion plan – an increase supported, in large part, by higher property tax revenues resulting from the hot real-estate market. The mayor said he used the windfall, as well as money squeezed from efficiencies, to allocate $49 million as the first installment in his five-year plan to eliminate a structural deficit – a gap between revenues and expenditures that has grown over the years to $295 million. “I think this budget takes a responsible approach in paying off the deficit and meeting the needs of the city,” Villaraigosa said. The budget also formalizes Villaraigosa’s proposal to charge homeowners an additional $7 monthly for trash collection – a fee that would go to $28 a month by 2010 – to pay to hire 1,000 police officers over the next five years. Residents now pay $11 a month for their trash cans. “I think the public is aware of the need for this and will support it,” Villaraigosa said, adding that he has received few complaints from constituents about the previously announced fee increase. And he said he will press the City Council to create a special fund to ensure that the revenue is used only for public safety. “I’ve seen what happens in government and we want to make sure it goes for this purpose. If not for more police officers, than the technology and equipment we need.” Overall spending for the LAPD is going up 6.9 percent, to $1.2 billion, to cover the cost of new equipment, including cameras in patrol cars. In addition to paying down the deficit, Villaraigosa said he has eliminated a number of positions in the budget, limited new or expanded services in programs and worked to reduce workers’ compensation costs. One of the areas that did get more money is gang reduction – a $2 million infusion of cash to create intervention, job training and mentoring programs for at-risk children ages 7-14. Another $2 million will be used to expand a pilot project that will allow 1,400 high school students to attend classes in the morning and work in the afternoon. The mayor, who met with neighborhood council leaders and council members in developing the spending plan, also included a reserve fund of $146 million, representing about 3.4 percent of the general fund budget of $4.3 billion – the largest in the city’s history, according to city Administrative Officer Bill Fujioka. “He’s showing responsibility as the chief executive,” said Bob Stern with the Center for Governmental Studies. “He’s looking to the future to make sure the deficit doesn’t get any bigger. If there’s a deficit now with a good economy, imagine what it will be when there’s a bad economy.” In proposing the budget, Villaraigosa was helped by a strong local economy in all areas where the city collects revenues, boosting the budget by 11 percent – about $400 million. Officials said $200 million of that increased spending will go to cover higher pension costs for city workers, making up for underperforming stocks. About $50 million will be used for a variety of programs, including expanded library hours at all branch libraries, expanding the L.A.’s BEST after-school program, a summer youth jobs program and creation of a unit to look for more park space in the city. There also is funding for a variety of programs the mayor has discussed over the past year, such as planting 1 million trees, funding affordable-housing projects and expanding transportation programs. The remaining funds are expected to be needed for cost-of-living adjustments for workers and salary increases. The city is in contract negotiations with its 13,000 police officers and firefighters. Each 1 percent increase in salary costs taxpayers $13 million, officials said. Councilman Bernard Parks, who chairs the council’s budget and finance committee, said this week that he was pleased with the mayor’s proposal. “He reflects the priorities that we as a council have, with public safety being our top concern and also dealing with crime prevention.” Council President Eric Garcetti said during a news conference Wednesday that he supports the mayor’s call to expand library services and gang prevention. The plan also increases spending for the Mayor’s Office by 28 percent, from $6.7 million to $8.6 million, and boosts the City Council’s budget by nearly 4 percent, from $20.9 million to $22.7 million. A spokesman said former mayors always underestimated their expenses and then wound up overspending. Villaraigosa is trying to be more upfront in his operation, he said. Revenue projections also increased across the board. The documentary transfer tax – a fee charged when property is sold – should produce $220 million, about $34 million more than expected. By the end of this fiscal year, that’s expected to come in at $190 million. The city business tax has generated $420 million – $34 million more than anticipated. Because of that, Villaraigosa said, the city will be able to cut business taxes 4 percent next fiscal year and extend the waiver of taxes to firms earning less than $100,000 a year. “I am pleased and not surprised,” Councilwoman Wendy Greuel said of the increased tax revenue. She pushed for business tax reform to send a message that “Los Angeles is open for business and we want their business,” and she attributes the higher returns to companies that chose to move here or stay here. Sales tax revenue also came in higher than expected, at $338 million, $28 million more than had been estimated. Villaraigosa said he expects to keep the transfer from the Department of Water and Power to the city general fund at about the same level as this year – $220 million. The DWP board is considering a 7.4 percent, two-year surcharge on power rates. The budget will be considered by City Council committees, which will hold hearings on the proposal before the full council votes on the plan in June. Staff Writer Kerry Cavanaugh contributed to this report. rick.orlov@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VAN NUYS – Flanked by uniformed LAPD cadets to symbolize his commitment to public safety, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Thursday proposed a $6.7 billion budget that will focus on “cops and kids.” More than 40 percent of the budget – the biggest chunk – is allocated for community safety, including police, fire and public assistance. About 26 percent goes to municipal services such as trash collection and sewage; 14 percent to transportation; and 6 percent to cultural and recreational programs. Nearly 11 percent pays for administrative costs and 2 percent for human resources. “Every budget is a balancing act, every budget is a statement of values,” Villaraigosa said at a news conference at Van Nuys City Hall. last_img read more

THREE DONEGAL OUTLETS PROSECUTED BY FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY

first_imgA Donegal food outlet was ordered to close and two other local outlets prosecuted in September.Closure orders were served on seven food businesses in September by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland.The Express Fast Food Takeaway at Ballinamore in Fintown was prosecuted while the FSA also moved against the Halfway House restaurant, Tooban, Burnfoot (two prosecutions) and the Atlantic Bar, Main Street in Buncrana. “There can be no excuse for putting consumers’ health at risk through negligent practices,” said authority chief executive Pamela Byrne.“We are re-emphasising to all food businesses the need for rigorous compliance with food safety and hygiene legislation. This requires putting appropriate food safety management procedures in place and making sure they are adhered to at all times.”Under the FSAI Act, 1998, a closure order is served where it is deemed that there is or there is likely to be a grave and immediate danger to public health at or in the premises; or where an improvement order is not complied with.Closure orders can refer to the immediate closure of all or part of the food premises, or all or some of its activities. Closure orders and improvement orders remain listed on the FSAI website for a period of three months from the date of when a premises is adjudged to have corrected its food safety issue.THREE DONEGAL OUTLETS PROSECUTED BY FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY was last modified: October 7th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Food Safety Authoritylast_img read more

IT’S OFFICIAL – DONEGAL ACCENT IS IRELAND’S FAVOURITE!

first_imgWe’ve suspected it for a while – but now it has been officially confirmed – our accent is Ireland’s favourite!!The survey was compiled by The Sliced Pan – and Donegal received over 4,000 votes! Over 40,000 contributed to the poll, and the resounding winner of the survey was Donegal.We faced stiff competition from Galway – and despite a late surge of votes for Cork we won out in the end.Describing why Donegal won, The Sliced Pan wrote, “Features a complete inability to speak without sounding like said person is up to some sort of devilment.”Offaly was voted the worst accent in the entire country! We always knew it, but it’s official – we’re class!IT’S OFFICIAL – DONEGAL ACCENT IS IRELAND’S FAVOURITE! was last modified: February 4th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AccentdonegalFeaturesIrelandnewsNo.1The Sliced Panlast_img read more

JAIL FOR THUG BEHIND VICIOUS ‘FOUR LANTERNS’ ATTACK

first_imgJason HaugheyA NOTORIOUS criminal is back behind bars this evening – after admitting his part in a vicious attack.Jason Haughey, 23, from Letterkenny, landed a number of blows on a man as he ate food at a Four Lanterns restaurant, the town’s District Court heard. Inspector Goretti Sheridan told Judge Paul Kelly that the incident took place at 3am on October 31, 2011.Haughey and two other men repeatedly punched Gerard Gallagher, even after he had fallen to the ground.The other two men had already been dealt with by the courts.Haughey, she said, had 37 previous convictions.Defence solicitor Patsy Gallagher said Haughey “who is known to the court” had got involved with what was a family dispute.“It was a case of cousins fighting between themselves and he found himself in the middle of it,” said the lawyer.But he said Haughey was now “finally” trying to deal with drug and drink addictions – addictions he had since the age of 14.Mr Gallagher said his client had spent 15 days in hospital recently in an effor to finally “break free” of these addictions.“Mr Haughey is now on medication and he knows he will be so for a very long time if not for the rest of his life,” said the solicitor.“This the calmest state I have seen in him in a long time,” he added, asking for a lenient sentence.However Judge Paul Kelly said the incident was “very serious.”He told the court: “This was a man sitting in a food restaurant minding his own business and he was set upon by three people, one of whom was Mr Huaghey.”He jailed Haughey for four months.JAIL FOR THUG BEHIND VICIOUS ‘FOUR LANTERNS’ ATTACK was last modified: November 12th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultjailJason HaugheyLetterkenny Courtlast_img read more

LADIES GAA: FANAD GAELS SNATCH DRAMATIC DRAW AGAINST TERMON

first_imgAll County U 18 Ladies  ChampionshipFanad Gaels  4–7  Termon 4–7Fanad Gaels  came  from behind  to  snatch  a dramatic  draw at Portsalon in this  entertaining game on Sunday  evening Fanad Gaels  who were  a  goal up after  two minutes  when Aisling  Mc Devitt netted were the more superior side early  in the  first  half  thanks  to good play  by Aisling Mc Dermott  and Sarah  Sweeney. Termon  won  the toss  played with  the  wind  and  the  slope  went in at  the  break  one point  down 3–2  to 2–4   thanks to   two  Dara  Kelly goals  and  two  Rosie Gallagher points, whereas  Fanad who had seven wides had  goals  from Maeve Mc  Ginley  and  a toe poked  goal  by Aisling  Mc DevittOn the  resumption Termon were  first out  of the traps  with Holly  Mc Daid levelling  matters , Dara  Kelly added  a point before Holly  Mc Daid  put  Termon four  ahead.  Disaster  struck Gaeil   Fanada  then  when Eimer Gibbons was  shown a  yellow  card. But up  stepped  Aoife  Mc Devitt  with  two unanswered points. Mc  Devitt  was  in the action again  when she  fired in  a low  shot  at  Caroline  Gallagher  in the  Termon  goal. Gallagher  did well  to block  but the her  outward  delivery rebounded back  into  the  Termon  net  to leave Fanad Gaels down  two  with seven  minutes extra  time  played. Aisling Mc Dermott put one  between the  teams with  ten extra  minutes played  and  with eleven minutes of  extra  time played . Despite good  play by  Emer Gallagher  Termon were on the  back foot and  despite stout defending by  the Ryans, Orla  Trearty   Meabh  mc  Daid and  Shauna  Kelly Termon  could  not  withstand the  presuure and  were forced to  commit  a  free twenty one  meter out in front  of  referee Michael  Mulhern from  St  Eunans in the  final minute  and Sarah  Sweeney  had  the simple  task of levelling  matters on the stroke  of fulltime. Confusion reigned for some moments  before modern technology  relayed  a message that  this game  is  to be  replayed at a  neutral  venue,Best for  Fanad  was Roisin  Carr.  Aisling  Mc  Dermott, Aoife Mc Devitt  and Sarah  Sweeney,Termon was  best  served  by  the  Gallaghers ,Lucy O  Flynn, Dara Kelly   and  person  of  the  match Eimer Gallagher  Gaeil  Fanads  team  was ,Deirdre  Friel, Heather Dougherty, Roisin Carr, Shauna Mc Devitt, Eimer Gibbons, Orla  Mc  Monagle, Shannon Sweeney, Aisling  Mc Dermott, Michelle  Sweeney, Eimer Gibbons, Aoife Mc Devitt, Maeve  Mc Ginley, Aisling Mc Devitt,  Sarah  Sweeney, Mairead Coll.Termon  team was, Caroline  Gallagher, Meabh mc Daid, Orla  Trearty, Celine  Mc Daid, Shannon Kelly, Aisling  Ryan, Aoife  Ryan, Lucy  o  Flynn, Eimer  Gallagher, Anna  Gallagher, Roseleen  Gallagher Sonia  Connaghan, Molly  Callaghan, Dara  Kelly, Holly Mc Daid . LADIES GAA: FANAD GAELS SNATCH DRAMATIC DRAW AGAINST TERMON was last modified: October 1st, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LADIES GAA: FANAD GAELS SNATCH DRAMATIC DRAW AGAINST TERMONlast_img read more

Five vie for college board

first_img160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! After talking with teachers and other staff on campus, Teresa Todd hopes to improve relations among these employees and the school’s administration. The 47-year-old Santa Clarita resident said that many on the school’s staff feel jilted with salaries, in comparison to the annual increases that Superintendent Dianne Van Hook sees and the bonuses that others receive. Todd wants to find a way to meet the needs of these employee groups within the constraints of the budget. Another issue that motivates Todd to run for the board happened after she filed for the seat this year when trustee Ron Gillis was censured after revealing a real estate transaction that involved the college during open session at a board meeting. Todd disagrees with the board’s action. “Right or wrong, it really shed light on a board dynamic that may be dysfunctional,” Todd said. Todd owns McCabe Todd Consulting, a public relations and marketing agency in Santa Clarita. From 1999-2003, she served on the board for the Sulphur Springs School District. Todd is also a chairwoman for the Santa Clarita Council PTA. Trustee Ernie Tichenor, 49, says the college is in the middle of the most productive period in the school’s 36-year history and wants to keep the momentum going. He’s referring to the school’s partnerships with local businesses and the future opening of a biomedical lab on campus that will connect students with the biotech industry and its leaders. In addition, the school is expanding with a new satellite campus coming to Canyon Country in 2006. But overall, it’s classroom learning that matters most, Tichenor said. “Most importantly, it’s this great quality education that we’re providing the students,” Tichenor said. “And I want to continue along that same vein.” A political science teacher at Bakersfield College, a community college about 85 miles north, Tichenor also attends school at California State University, Northridge, where he’s working toward a credential to teach high school. He has served two terms as a trustee for College of the Canyons. Jonathan Kraut wants to cultivate a stronger internship program between students and local businesses, particularly in the fields of technology, dentistry and auto repair. The internships help students get on track with careers after college. In addition, Kraut wants professionals from those fields to design courses and teach on campus, since they are most current with what’s happening in those areas. Kraut also wants to improve relationships with the college staff and have more participation with them when it comes to making decisions that affect the school. The 50-year-old Santa Clarita resident is president of Net Check Investigations, a private investigation company. He also teaches Latin dance and culture part time through the Parks and Recreation Department with the city of Los Angeles. Kraut has not held public office before. As a former College of the Canyons adjunct professor, Ronald Vitale said the school’s faculty and students are not treated fairly by the administration and that the relationship needs reforming. Vitale said that faculty wages and grievances are mishandled and that the staff members fear retaliation by the school’s administration, the board of trustees, when they have complaints. “I’m deeply concerned because people are afraid that the administration that they work for would retaliate against them,” Vitale said. “I’m very appalled by that.” Tuition also weighs on his mind. Vitale said tuition must remain affordable in order to give all an education said that’s what community colleges are supposed to do. The 55-year-old Castaic man is a real estate broker and runs Vitale and Associates Real Estate Group. He taught real estate law, principles and practices at College of the Canyons for six years. He has not served in public office before. Sue Doyle, (661) 257-5254 sue.doyle@dailynews.com AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week All want to sit on the five-member trustee board and have issues in mind that are driving them to serve for the next four years. For MacGregor, board president, it starts with funding. The 59-year-old Santa Clarita resident said College of the Canyons does not receive the money that it should, and that it never has. She said the school needs to generate more funding through grants and with partnerships in the community. MacGregor said the college must continue its high transfer rate of students to four-year universities. The rate is used as a measuring stick of academic success among community colleges. “It shows that our faculty and our students are achieving those results in order to get those students prepared for a continuation of their education after they leave College of the Canyons,” MacGregor said. A trustee with the college for 12 years, MacGregor also owns Valley Oak Properties Inc., a Santa Clarita-based brokerage real estate company. center_img SANTA CLARITA – Business partnerships, employee relationships and funding for College of the Canyons are on the minds of five residents vying for two trustee seats with the community college. The race has two incumbents seeking re-election and three hopefuls looking for a start with public service on a board that helps shape the education of more than 14,000 students enrolled at the Valencia school. New candidates choose the board members they want to challenge on the Nov. 8 ballot. So in this race, Teresa Todd and Ronald Vitale are aiming for Joan MacGregor’s seat. Jonathan Kraut hopes to replace Ernie Tichenor. last_img read more

Express duo cleared for league action

first_imgJohnny Levita in action against Wakiso Giants in preseason (file photo)WANKULUKUKU – Having missed the draw at home to URA and the 3-1 defeat away to Mbarara City due to International Transfer Certificates (ICT) issues, Express duo of Isaac Mutanga and Johnny Levita have been given the go ahead to start playing.After sorting everything out with their former side CD Bukavu Dawa of Congo, the pair is now expected to feature in Express’s next dual with Police FC when the league resumes next week.Defender Isaac Mutanga is on a return to Express after playing for the 6-time champions in the 2015-16 season. He was named assistant captain at the start of this season to deputise Julius Ntambi.Johny Levita is expected to be a mainstay in Kefa Kisala’s midfield department on the account of his impressive preseason exploits.Express who sit 13th on the log will play against Police FC at the StarTimes Stadium Lugogo in their next league game on Tuesday 16th October.Comments Tags: Express FCpolice fcStarTimes Uganda Premier Leaguelast_img read more

Late season rains thwart disaster for many Ohio crop farms in 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Thank God for the rains in August — farmers in Ohio who have not done this yet, should consider doing so promptly. Those incredibly valuable rains in mid- to late-August were the thin thread saving many fields from a total yield disaster.By early August nearly all of Ohio was suffering from varying degrees of hot and dry conditions. On the week ending Aug. 7, the growing degree day accumulation was well ahead of normal for nearly every location in Ohio monitored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, with locations in eastern Ohio leading the charge. New Philadelphia was plus 574 GDDs and Cambridge had a whopping 653 GDDs more than normal. As temperatures soared, rainfall really dropped off. The Aug. 7 NASS report reflected this trend clearly with nearly every Ohio location in a rainfall deficit compared to normal. Sydney was over nine inches of rain behind and Ashtabula was at 9.99 inches below normal, according to NASS.The situation was nearly the complete opposite of the previous year for Mike Heffelfinger in Van Wert County. In the 2015 growing season, by mid-August Heffelfinger’s farm had gotten close to 40 inches of rain. In 2016, he had gotten 2.3 inches inches of rain from the third week of May through mid-August. The conditions on either extreme in the last two years produced dismally similar tough yield situations for the farm.This year, early corn harvest reflected the tough conditions of 2016 for Heffelfinger, though it was not a total disaster.“We are seeing 140-bushel corn. I wouldn’t have guessed that a month or two ago. We are just really getting a good start with corn but in the fields we have harvested, 140 has hit it pretty close,” Heffelfinger said. “That 2.3 inches this summer gave us something. It is not anything to brag about but it is better than anticipated.”The saving grace was the soybean yield on the farm thanks in large part to the 11.5 inches of rain that fell in the area from Aug. 12 through late October.“We got two inches on Oct. 21 and we were back out in the fields four days later. It usually takes longer to get back out on the fields after a rain like that at that time of year. Because of that I think we are still shy on subsoil moisture,” Heffelfinger said. “We could run into some very poor yielding corn yet but we have had some pleasant surprises so far. The soybeans were excellent and corn could be better, but we are not going to complain after the heat and dry weather this summer. I saw a range on the yield monitor from 211 to 67 bushels in one corn field. It is amazing to watch.”It was not even in the areas of the worst stress in the state where dramatic differences in corn yields were evident. By any measure, many parts of Fairfield County were comparatively low stress in 2016 for corn production in Ohio.“We were only probably stressed for two weeks, and some of our varieties handled that little bit of stress better than others,” said Jon Miller, who farms in eastern Fairfield County. “It was not in adjoining fields, but they were close on the same farm, where we had some of our best corn averaging 239 bushels and some of our worst corn averaging in the 180s. The one field had some drainage issues, but it was still a big difference. You are talking about a 40- or 50-bushel difference on the same farm.”A couple of hybrids really stood out for the Millers.“If we would have had the right hybrid on all of our acres we would have probably had at least another 15-bushel average increase over everything. We had another hybrid that didn’t do as well for us last year and we didn’t go gangbusters planting it this year,” Miller said. “The guys that had good luck with it last year planted quite a bit this year and it did really well for them again. There are always subtle differences between hybrids but there were a couple that were pretty major on yield difference.”Even the short stretch of very hot, dry conditions for the Miller farm were enough to take the top end off of what would have otherwise been a bumper crop year for corn in 2016.“A second variety that did really well for us is more of a workhorse variety that you put in your tougher conditions. It handled the stress and tougher conditions this year and out-yielded what is considered a racehorse hybrid, even on the good ground,” Miller said. “You could pay a lot of bills if you had the right varieties planted this year.”Similar yield gaps were not uncommon in corn fields around the state, said Peter Thomison, Ohio State University corn specialist.“These are the types of years that really magnify differences among hybrids. The boring years are the ones you like because we don’t see this as much, but when you have these stressed conditions you really can magnify the variability that exists between hybrids and fields. How much of that difference is due to genetics, maturity or plant architecture? Slight differences in maturity and planting dates can make a big difference,” Thomison said. “It is possible under different growing conditions next year you could see no yield difference between those same hybrids or even a flip-flop because the way the hybrids respond to the conditions.“It was kind of the worst-case scenario this year. It was cold and wet early and then we had a frost in mid-May and had some replanting because of that. Then corn was vulnerable when the heat and dry conditions came along abruptly. I think we had 44 counties that were in moderate drought stress on the Drought Monitor for a week or two this summer. In northern Ohio there were some places looking pretty bad and in the southeast and southwest things were looking pretty good in many areas.”The details of the duration of the hot and dry conditions varied significantly but much-needed relief came statewide with August rains. The timing of these rains allowed them to have variable impacts on Ohio crops, depending on their maturity at the time.“It was remarkable that the crops did as well as they did. When the rainfall came in August, some of the later planted corn actually benefitted from those rains,” Thomison said. “In some cases you could see that it affected ear development. Sometimes it appeared that the lower half of the ear was at the dough stage and the upper half was at the milk stage. You could see different patterns of colors and starch development because that rain in August really saved the upper part of those ears. We could have otherwise had big tip dieback on a lot of these ears. Yields could have been a lot worse.”In some cases, there is speculation that the use of fungicides this year (even with little to no disease pressure in the fields) helped plant health just enough to allow the corn plants to better capitalize on the valuable August rains.“I have heard from some growers and field agronomists about the plant health benefits of fungicides this year. They didn’t have the disease pressure and they are seeing higher yields, but they are also seeing much higher moisture corn,” Thomison said. “Plant health and fungicides are a touchy issue. I have done work with this, along with plant pathologists, and it is frustrating. We have done the work for several years and not seen any benefits. Then, lo and behold, we have a year like this and we see a response. It would be nice if we knew under what conditions it worked. It is like shooting dice. You never know the year you’re going to see the benefits of these fungicides. When corn is $7 or $8 you can put it on as a risk management tool, but when corn is $3.50 it is a different story. The speculation is that the longer you keep that corn green, the more opportunity you have to extend the filling period for corn. If you kept that canopy alive longer this year it may have translated into higher yields with the rains.”Unfortunately, along with salvaging many otherwise disastrous yields, the rains in August brought with them a new set of challenges that would show up in the following weeks as harvest got started. The nearly dead corn plants that found new life were subject to a number of problems due to the unique conditions, including ear molds, sprouting and stalk quality concerns.“We had a whole range of molds. We started off thinking it was Diplodia, but some of the fields I saw had more Gibberella and some fields had Trichoderma. In all of my time here I have never seen Trichoderma as severe as it was this year in some fields.I think the ear rots are widespread around the state but they are also fairly localized,” Thomison said. “These problems have the potential to get much worse as harvest is delayed. In some fields with fairly mild problems, they could be showing more mold as we progress if harvest delays occur. Moldy ear problems just get worse until they are stored below 14%. The longer corn is out there the more it will lodge and deteriorate and contribute to the mold problems. Grain moisture is the biggest issue until it gets below freezing. With the temperature swings we have been seeing this fall we could see mold growth continue.”A number of factors contributed to the fairly widespread issue of ear molds in 2016.“Moldy ear problems were in some cases associated with the earliest planted corn. Often it was in early hybrids with early planting dates. It was hit with high temperatures during pollination and was under stress and then it was a combination of the hybrid susceptibility, maturity, the stress it received, and planting date. That is not black and white, but it is a pattern we have been seeing,” Thomison said. “A lot of the corn in our performance trials was planted after May 23. The earlier planted locations had more mold and it was more prevalent in the early hybrids. The pollination period was just a little earlier — before mid-May — and those earlier planted hybrids were more stressed. We’ve only seen mold present at one out of seven locations in our yield trials so far and lodging has been nearly absent from our fields.”Of course, with ear molds, mycotoxins can be a concern, especially when being fed to livestock.“Some of the corn that has no mold in it still can actually have elevated levels of mycotoxins too, according to OSU plant pathologists. If you are in fields with mold present you certainly want to take a second look at it before feeding,” Thomison said. “Some of the elevators and ethanol plants are looking for this right now in the counties where this has been the biggest problem.”Along with the molds, sprouting corn was more of an issue than normal this year.“We saw much more sprouting than we have in recent years. The fungi that infected the ears actuallyDiplodia. Photo by OSU Extension.stimulate the sprouting in the ear,” he said. “In some cases there were loose husks that allowed rainfall to get in while the ear was still upright and accumulate at the butt of the ear and we saw the sprouting at the butt if the ear. When we had molds at the tip of the ear sometimes we’d see the sprouting at the tip.”Another challenge that surfaced in 2016 corn was the surprising amount of damage from the western bean cutworm in supposedly resistant corn hybrids, particularly in northwest Ohio.“Western bean cutworm issues will be a major consideration because there really are not many hybrids out there with the trait that controls them and OSU entomologists are telling us we may have to consider insecticide applications in some situations to control them,” Thomison said.In terms of soybeans, the August rains made a tremendous difference with many farms statewide seeing some of their best average yields ever. Along with strong yields, though, were green stems and uneven maturation slowing harvest, splitting pods encouraging a faster harvest, and a growing concern about stink bug damage and other insect issues that showed up this year.last_img read more