Round Robin: One-on-one with Humboldt Crabs skipper Guiver

first_imgIt would’ve been easy for manager Robin Guiver to mash the panic button.A torrent of losses left not only his Humboldt Crabs baseball team reeling at 6-10 overall, but its faithful fans on the North Coast scratching their heads at the inauspicious start to the team’s 75th anniversary season.But Guiver doesn’t do easy. You don’t become a fixture in Crabs coaching by doing things easy. When Guiver says “he’s been doing this a long time”, he’s not fibbing. He’s been on the Crabbies coaching …last_img read more

New skills council for SA

first_imgMinister Blade Nzimande and Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe will play a critical role in HRDC. Members of the Council Advocate Rams Ramashia and Ebrahim Patel, Minister of Economic Development. Motlanthe and Bheki Ntshalintshali, HRDC first deputy chair of the council and chair of the technical working group. (Images: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ranjeni Munusamy Spokesperson Ministry of Higher Education and Training +27 828986082 or +27 12 312 5555 munusamy.r@doe.gov.za RELATED ARTICLES • Zuma’s 2010 plan of action • Turning jobless into jewellers • Govt launches massive ID drive • Social development in South Africa • First university for MpumalangaBongani NkosiThe South African government has launched the Human Resources Development Council (HRDC) to tackle high levels of unemployment and grow the country’s economy.It was officially launched by Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe at the Presidential Guesthouse in Pretoria on 30 March. The inaugural meeting was attended by 36 of the council’s 43 members.Comprising leaders from different sectors of the economy, the council will drive skills development in South Africa. Although part of its aim is to ensure government helps job-seekers become more competent, the HRDC will see that all divisions of employment and training assume a more meaningful role in the country.“Government has for years spoken about skills development and its importance in ensuring economic development and ultimately dealing with unemployment,” said Minister of Higher Education and Training Blade Nzimande at the launch.“The launch of this council is a milestone towards this goal and ensuring that skills development is conceptualised as a critical component of … human development.”The council is led and chaired by the deputy president and Nzimande leads its secretariat, which is tasked with ensuring that all the HRDC’s objectives are implemented.The secretariat includes a technical working group to “execute the decisions of council on matters relating to human resource development and advise council”.The technical working group will also be responsible for setting up task teams of “additional expertise” to achieve the council’s goals. “The composition of these [task teams] will depend on the nature and scope of work that the TWG [technical working group] needs them to undertake,” said Mary Metcalfe, director-general of the Higher Education and Training Department, during a presentation at the launch.“Education is one of government’s priorities and the work of this council will assist in troubleshooting the problem areas in the education and training system,” said Nzimande.The Department of Higher Education has committed to “urgently overcoming the shortages in the supply of people with the priority skills needed” and “increasing the number of appropriately skilled people to meet the demands of our current and emerging economic and social development priorities”, Nzimande added.The council will also ensure improved access to quality education and schooling up to grade 12 level “that is purposefully focused on achieving an improvement in education outcomes for the poor”. Furthermore, it will seek to adequately equip pupils to pursue post-school education, “including vocational education and training, or employment”.It has resolved to “urgently implement skills development programmes that are aimed at overcoming poverty and unemployment”, Nzimande said.In his address the minister referred to students from the country’s universities of technology who have to do internships before they can graduate, but yet some still struggle to find permanent work – either in the public or private sector. He said the council needs to find a way of getting employers to open up work spaces for such students.“Many of our young people with academic qualifications remain unemployed because our skills supply does not match our labour market demands,” said Motlanthe. “We need to ensure that our human resources policies harmonise with economic development needs and opportunities, and that they are broad-based and opportunity-specific.”Extension of JipsaThe new council builds on the Joint Initiative on Priority Skills Acquisition (Jipsa), which government formed in March 2006. It is not a replacement, said Motlanthe.Jipsa was set up to address the issue of skills development in the country and helped shape policy for curbing unemployment. “Jipsa came as an intervention at that time,” said former Jipsa chairperson Bheki Ntshalintshali.Government said Jipsa has, over a four-year period, provided critical lessons on how to deal with skills challenges facing the country. As Cabinet approved the HRDC in February, “the Jipsa process started winding down with a view to folding into the revised” strategy, said a government document.Council led by expertsGovernment has said it is pleased about the council’s composition, which includes experts from labour organisations, business, academia, government ministries, the development sector, research bodies, higher education institutions, skills sector and youth movements. “It is encouraging to note that all members are committed to serve on this important structure, not necessarily representing their own sectoral interests, but to collectively lead a decisive attack on education and skills challenges facing South Africa,” Nzimande said.Ntshalintshali, also the deputy general secretary of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, has been appointed chairperson of the technical working group and the first deputy chair of the council.Nominations for a second deputy chair and requests to serve on the technical working group are open to council members until 16 April.The final HRD strategy, drafted by the council, will be adopted at a Cabinet planning session later in 2010.last_img read more

Twilight Touch Weekend

first_imgEighteen teams will compete across the mixed, women’s and men’s divisions.Some of Canberra’s finest touch players will be on show including Bec Beath, Pippi Langford and Australian representatives, Matt Atkins, Dean Taylor and Josh Wilkinson. Another Australian representative, Jake Evans, will line up for the Hunter Hornets.As part of the weekend, ACT junior teams will participate in a feature match during the break on Saturday night. The Twilight Touch Weekend will tap-off from 2pm on Saturday with the semi-finals and final held on Sunday.last_img read more

SMU’s Yanick Moreira Tweets Frustration With Goaltend Call, Calls Out Kevin Durant, Apologizes To Fans

first_imgYanick Moreira called for questionable goaltend.In what was one of the craziest endings we’ve ever seen in an NCAA Tournament game, No. 6 seed SMU lost to No. 11 seed UCLA on a goaltending call. The call was somewhat questionable, but it gave the Bruins a one-point lead, eventually sending them into the Third Round with a 60-59 victory. Following the devastating loss, SMU senior forward Yanick Moreira, the recipient of the goaltending call, took to Twitter to express his frustration. I would like to apologize for all the SMU fans as senior I shouldn’t make those type of mistake.. I’m really sorry— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015“@KDTrey5: Yep that was a goaltend.” You right ref thank you for end my college career pic.twitter.com/nhrrON0DQM— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015These guys don’t deserve it . It really hurts . All those mile run in the summer all those 2 a day to end my college career like this— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015Here’s the play. Was it the right call?last_img read more

Rice Football Signed A 7-Year-Old Boy With Leukemia In A Very Special Ceremony

first_imgRice Leukemia SigneeRice Leukemia SigneeThe Rice football program landed a very special recruit on Wednesday. Seven-year-old Ziggy Stoval-Redd, who is battling leukemia, signed with the Owls during a special signing ceremony. Accompanied by his mother and Rice head football coach David Bailiff, Ziggy received a warm round of applause from the Owl team. Here’s the video:Whenever stories like this pop up in the sports world, it always warms the heart a little bit.last_img

OOCL Modifies Asia NAEC Coverage

first_imgzoom OOCL, a Hong Kong-based shipping company and a member of the G6 Alliance, plans to start implementing its Asia – North America East Coast Winter Program in response to seasonal changes in market demand. The service changes, which are subject to regulatory approval, include the suspension of the China East Coast Express 2 (CEC2) service from Week 45 and the new port of call on the company’s China East Coast Express (CEC) coverage.Last eastbound sailing on the CEC2 will be the BVA (Bellavia), with an estimated time of arrival at Da Chan Bay, China, on October 30, 2016.CEC2 South China/Southeast Asia port coverage will be provided by OOCL’s current CEC service.CEC service will add Da Chan Bay port call to enhance South China coverage.The enhanced service will be effective from Week 44 via BRX (Bremen Express), with an estimated time of arrival at Kaohsiung on November 3, 2016.The new port rotation of the CEC service will include ports of Kaoshiung (Taiwan), Da Chan Bay, Shekou,  Hong Kong, Yantian (China), Singapore (Singapore), (via Suez Canal), New York, Savannah, Charleston, Norfolk (US), (via Suez Canal), Singapore, Cai Mep (Vietnam), Hong Kong, Kaoshiung.last_img read more

Bryson Starts Youth Sports Coalition to Improve PG County Athletics

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, AFRO Staff Writer, mgray@afro.comDr. Rick Bryson has long been an advocate for youth sports and participatory activities in Prince George’s County. Bryson has put his money where his money mouth is by creating the County’s Scholastic Sports Awards Banquet and has now begun a new initiative designed to improve the quality of youth and participatory sports.Dr. Bryson’s latest cause is the creation of the Youth Scholastic Coalition, designed to support and advocate for the activities kids participate in while collaborating with the scholastic support network for young athletes throughout Prince George’s County. Building bridges for youth and scholastic sports athletes with an academic support network has been a passion for the longtime podiatrist since his days as a baseball dad when his son was growing up and competing in Accokeek.The PG Youth Sports Coalition hopes to improve the quality of baseball field throughout the county. (Courtesy Photo)During that time Dr. Bryson built a relationship with St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Fort Washington. For three years youth baseball players from the District and Prince George’s County participated in an academic development program that served as the genesis for the establishment of the coalition. They competed on the field while “barnstorming” throughout the DMV for games during the summer.However, the players also participated in a Scholastic Aptitude Testing Program at the church for 12 weeks over three years. The synergy between the athletics and academics for that group of players helped prepare them for the road to college. Several players part of the initial group would head to schools such as the U.S. Air Force Academy and Morehouse College to pursue their college degrees not just as athletes.“Sports is one thing, but academics will carry you which is what we’re trying to stress,” Bryson told the {AFRO}. “It was a lot easier to get the kids to participate in the learning phase when their peers were a part of the program.”There are many organizations in the community that provide academic and athletic options for youth as individuals and the Coalition is working to connect students with groups that will able to provide additional information and services. For example, organizations with athletic–based programs can expose their participants to services offered by an academic-based program. Those programs can include everything from college preparatory test tutoring to advising families about the NCAA eligibility clearinghouse requirements for potential college student-athletes.“Most groups are focused on the specific activities of their respective organizations, but the Coalition’s focus is on addressing issues that concern everyone,” Bryson said. “The basic premise of establishing the Coalition is the belief that collectively, organizations can be more effective in addressing concerns and issues that have an impact on the community, if there is a positive atmosphere of collaboration.”The Coalition is also serving as the advocate for the various needs related to youth sports programs in P.G. County. The Coalition assists by lobbying to improve facilities and interacts with various state and county officials to engage them in addressing issues of concern for high school sports participants as well. In addition to providing academic support and access to potential scholarship opportunities, one of its goals is to make access to quality fields a priority for all sports participants.The greatest challenge that faces the Coalition is developing corporate partnerships to help sponsor the programs Dr. Bryson and his group are working to establish. Grantors typically look favorably on civic organizations that partner with other groups to address community needs and services. The Coalition helps facilitate these partnerships.“We are aware of the various needs related to youth programs,” Bryson said. “We are working to identify grant-funding sources from various government and non-profit organizations.”last_img read more

Red Bee media will provide additional broadcast se

first_imgRed Bee media will provide additional broadcast services, including access services, rich metadata and sports analysis software Piero, as part of an expanded deal with BT Sport.The firm first announced in April that it had been chosen by BT to provide playout, channel and media management services for BT’s new live sports offering, which went live this month.Red Bee, which was acquired by Ericsson earlier this year, will now also  provide live and pre-recorded subtitling and audio description services, rich metadata services and its 3D sports analysis software, Piero.last_img read more

Make sure you have a neutral setting Dont talk t

first_imgMake sure you have a neutral setting. Don’t talk to the child about liberty, obedience, or anything along those lines before asking the question. Make sure that you are feeling neutral too. You should want to know the child’s opinion, sincerely. If the child answers more than a simple ‘Yes’ or ‘No,’ write down precisely what they say. Then, if necessary, write down your interpretation of what the child said and why you interpreted their meaning that way. We’re all born knowing the truth, but by the time you’re four or five years old, they’ve beaten it out of you. – Attributed to Bob Dylan I think I’d be a bit more charitable than Mr. Dylan; I’d say that we’ve only had the truth partly beaten out of us by the age of five. I think truth endures in us, at least to a significant extent, up till puberty, after which it is beaten into submission over the next decade or so. The Crazy Years We all have experience with the tumultuous years that begin with puberty: First we are slapped with a rush of hormones. That triggers a reproductive imperative. That’s crazy-making enough, but then we find ourselves inside of a rigid, status-based system… a system that massively influences all of our potential mates. That’s a recipe for the corruption of thought, and it does corrupt our thoughts. Orson Welles was an unusually clear-thinking and experienced child… far more experienced than average. He spent his days (he was what we’d now call home schooled) reading the works of Shakespeare and all the existing Greek tragedies, repetitively. As a man, Orson was once interviewed about his young days. The interviewer asked what he had thought of teenagers. Orson replied, “I thought they were absolutely insane.” I think all of us can understand why. Getting to the Truth So, if we want to get a glimpse of human nature before it’s stressed and shaped during the crazy years, we should really go to pre-teens. Granted, kids are not the pure saints they are sometimes imagined to be… and it is true that these kids are already sexualized and trained in status these days… but there remains, in most of them, some residue of honest thinking. They have not yet been dragged all the way into the conformist way of mind. My hypothesis is that most of us are born as natural libertarians – having a built-in bias toward liberty. And I have a clean way of testing this idea: Go to pre-teens, in a neutral setting, and ask them a very simple question: Shouldn’t you be allowed to do anything you want, as long as you don’t hurt anyone? My guess is that the results would show a large majority agreeing with the statement, and the younger the respondent, the higher the percentage. A Challenge to You I’d like to propose we actually run such an experiment. I’ll be pleased to coordinate and publish the data. In order to ensure that the results are meaningful, I recommend the following: After you write down the answer, feel free to continue the discussion with the child if fitting, but not if there are other study participants in the area. Keep them neutral.    Can I ask you a question? I want to know what you think about this. Since children have notoriously short attention spans, ask the question only after you have calmed them and centered their attention. I suggest something like this: As I say, I’ll be pleased to tabulate and publish the results if one or more of our readers want to run the experiment. I think the results might be very interesting… and quite possibly very useful. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

Disabled campaigners have welcomed the longawaite

first_imgDisabled campaigners have welcomed the long-awaited publication of draft legislation to create Europe-wide access laws.The European Commission – the European Union’s executive body – finally published a European Accessibility Act this week, 15 years after promising to outlaw the discrimination faced by disabled people in accessing goods and services.It said the act would set “common accessibility requirements for certain key products and services”, including cashpoint machines and other banking services, personal computers, telephones and television equipment, telephony and audio-visual services, transport, e-books and e-commerce.The publication came the day before the UN’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities (3 December), which this year had a theme of “access and empowerment for people of all abilities”.The proposed European Accessibility Act would complement Britain’s own Equality Act by making existing voluntary European access standards mandatory across the European Union (EU).The act’s publication comes only two months after the United Nations said it was “concerned” that a European Accessibility Act had not yet been adopted by the EU, and gave it just 12 months to explain how it would be introduced.Yannis Vardakastanis (pictured), president of the European Disability Forum (EDF), said the act could “contribute to the empowerment of persons with disabilities to better enjoy the freedom of movement of persons, goods and services in the European single market”.He said the act had been a “top priority” for EDF and its members for many years, through its Freedom of Movement campaign.But he said it was too early to comment on the content of the act itself.He said: “In the coming weeks and months EDF and its members will work together with the EU institutions, partner organisations and other stakeholders to make this piece of legislation meaningful for 80 million people with disabilities in Europe.”The European Blind Union (EBU) also welcomed the act’s publication.Wolfgang Angermann, EBU’s president, said: “We have faced discrimination for long enough.“Along with our partners in the European Disability Forum, we will respond thoughtfully to the consultation which has just opened on this proposed legislation.“After that, we will be urging all those involved in the legislative process to ensure this new law is fully effective and thorough.”Marianne Thyssen, the EU’s commissioner for employment, social affairs, skills and labour mobility, said: “Disability should not be a barrier to full participation in society, nor should the lack of EU common rules be a barrier to cross-border trade in accessible products and services.“With this act, we want to deepen the internal market and use its potential for the benefit of both companies and citizens with disabilities. In fact, we all may benefit from it.”The commission believes the act will make it easier for companies that want to export goods and services within the EU, and will help small business “take full advantage of the EU market”, with disabled people benefiting from “a greater supply of accessible products and services at more competitive prices”.Without the act, each EU country would continue to develop different laws as they implemented their accessibility obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Richard Howitt, the Labour MEP and co-president of the European Parliament’s all-party disability rights group, said European officials had “shamefully dragged their feet” on a promise made 15 years ago to outlaw disability discrimination in access to goods and services.  Howitt, who played a key role in negotiating that promise in 2000, said it would have been long-forgotten if it had not been for “16 years of relentless campaigning by disabled people’s organisations”.Howitt said: “It is shameful how long disabled people have been forced to wait and the foot-dragging by anyone and everyone in Brussels has to stop right now.“Echoing the slogans of disability activists, this is much more a victory by rather than for disabled people themselves.“When I helped negotiate the EU law against disability discrimination in access to employment in 2000, the European Parliament was promised that action to outlaw the same discrimination in access to goods and services would soon follow.“Today, we are close to achieving what for many years has simply only been a dream and equality itself is finally being given equal treatment.”He added: “Although I am proud that Europe has made progress in the past on disability access rules in relation to the installation of lifts, for some public transport and on the internet, the bitter truth is that a large swathe of the built environment remains a ‘no go’ area for people with disabilities in Britain and in Europe.”There will now be a period of eight weeks’ consultation, followed by legislative procedures in the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union.last_img read more