ST EUNAN’S COLLEGE RAISE €1,500 FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS

first_imgThe presentation to Letterkenny Strikers Special Olympics Club from St Eunan’s College.A group of Transition Year students from St Eunan’s College held a very successful table quiz in Arena 7 on Wednesday the 4th March in aid of two local Special Olympic clubs, Letterkenny Strikers Special Olympics Club and North West Special Olympics Club.This event was a huge success with 33 teams taking part on the night. The quizmaster, Mr. Neil Gordon, a teacher in Saint Eunan’s College, provided the audience with a great night’s entertainment.Apart from the actual quiz, Mr. Gordon had members of the audience vying for spot prizes by performing handstands, reciting poetry and doing push-ups. It is safe to say that this was not your ordinary quiz! The event raised €1,500, with €750 going to each club.This quiz was organised by a dedicated group of students, namely Jacek Bien, Lewis Carson, Seán Halvey, Mark Irwin, Kevin Kealy, Ruairí Kennedy, Ciaran McCloskey, Seán McGettigan, Ryan McGinty, Rafal Morys, and Cale O’Donnell.The €1,500 cheque presentation to local clubsThis group of students are taking part in a Special Olympics Module ‘So Get Into It’, facilitated by their teacher Ms. Ciara Boyle. These students have been meeting every Wednesday, after school, since September. As part of this module, students have been learning about enabling people with a learning disability to fulfil their potential and ambitions and fully participate in the world around them. This enrichment programme promotes the personal, social, educational and vocational development of pupils and helps prepare them for their role as autonomous, participative and responsible members of society.As part of this module, each of the students have registered as volunteers with Special Olympics Ireland and they have been volunteering with the beneficiaries of the quiz, Letterkenny Strikers Special Olympics Club and North West Special Olympics Club.In April of this year, this group of students will receive training from Special Olympics Ireland to prepare them to act as officials at the Special Olympics Basketball League Finals in Antrim Forum on Saturday the 9th of May.Presentation to North West Special Olympics ClubThere is great excitement about this upcoming event among the students. Their teacher Ms. Ciara Boyle said that these students have been a delight to work with and they are a credit to themselves, their families and their school.The Principal of Saint Eunan’s College, Mr. Chris Darby, had the following to say about the quiz: “I am delighted that the school was involved in such an excellent cause. Well done to the staff and students who put so much work into ensuring the evening was a success and a special thanks to the students that came along on the night to support their colleagues. I look forward to even more opportunity to work with Special Olympics in our school”.Saint Eunan’s College were overwhelmed by the huge support they received in the organisation of the quiz and they wish to sincerely thank the local businesses who made donations and sponsored raffle prizes (Fit Hub Ireland, Radisson Blue Hotel Letterkenny; Marks and Spencer; La Maison; Menary’s; The Sandwich Co; Evolve Menswear; Sony Centre; Universal Books, Dunnes Stores; Patrick Gildea Hairdressing; Tobin’s Service Station; Streets Ahead Hairdressing Salon; Joe’s Butchers; 4Lanterns; Apache Pizza; The Swingroom; Private Collections; McFadden’s Pharmacy; Pats on the Square; The Kitchen; Cooney’s Home and Garden; and Surprise Surprise). They wish to sincerely thank the management and staff of Arena 7 for facilitating the charity quiz night. They also wish to thank the volunteers and athletes of the local Special Olympics clubs for welcoming and accommodating the students as volunteers. Finally, they wish to express their sincere gratitude to everyone who came along to support the quiz and to those that bought raffle tickets and supported the event in any way.ST EUNAN’S COLLEGE RAISE €1,500 FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS was last modified: March 29th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalletterkennySt Eunan’w Collegelast_img read more

Chelsea target eyed by Spurs – report

first_imgScouts from Tottenham watched striker Hulk in action for Brazil against Great Britain on Friday, the Daily Mail claim.Chelsea have shown an interest in the Porto star, who it is suggested could be available for £38m.Meanwhile, QPR are ‘lukewarm’ about taking Roque Santa Cruz from Manchester City, the Daily Mirror report.The striker, who played under R’s boss Mark Hughes at City and Blackburn, has touted himself for a possible move to Loftus Road.But with an apparent lack of interest in him, Santa Cruz is now said to be hoping the likes of Wigan, Bolton and Blackburn pick him up.He is quoted as saying: “A north-west club would be ideal. I don’t want to keep moving my kids back and forth.”And the Mirror say former Chelsea boss Glenn Hoddle is discussing taking part in the television show Dancing on Ice.The Hayes-born 54-year-old would be “a guaranteed ratings winner” according to an ITV source quoted by the paper. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

SA gives more aid for Haiti recovery

first_img25 November 2010 With quake-ravaged Haiti facing a barrage of problems, including a major cholera outbreak, South Africa is giving the country a further R1-million in aid through the World Health Organisation to assist in its recovery process. “It is our wish that South Africa’s modest contribution would … [go towards] addressing this scourge, as it is known that cholera could effectively be treated if properly coordinated and addressed,” International Relations and Cooperation Deputy Minister Marius Fransman said during a handover ceremony in Pretoria on Wednesday. The donation was made through the World Health Organisation, and was accepted by WHO representative Dr Stella Anyangwe. “It is inspiring to find a country with its various challenges opening its heart to offer help to the most vulnerable outside its borders,” Anyangwe said. “This fund from South Africa is crucial because there is currently a need for clean water and food … Whatever our small contributions, they will all make a difference to the destitute pregnant women and children of Haiti.” Fransman said South Africa would not let up in its efforts to help Haiti, especially after Hurricane Tomas recently hit that country, leaving 21 dead and 6 000 people homeless. The January earthquake claimed an estimated 200 000 lives, leaving over 300 000 injured. The cholera outbreak is the first recorded in Haiti in 50 years. To date, over 19 000 people are been confirmed to be suffering from cholera. According to the Fransman, the death toll from cholera stands at over 1 300. He said the government noted with concern the United Nations’ finding that less than 10 percent of the funds needed for the cholera outbreak had been received. Another worry was the outbreak of violence and its impact on the delivery of much needed emergency aid to vulnerable people. “We wish to express our desire for all to work together during this difficult time to ensure that the human dignity of all people is protected,” Fransman said. “We believe that the answer to the enormous challenge of Haiti is to be found in a continued international response to [its] identified needs.” South Africa pledged to contribute R5-million to the reconstruction efforts of Haiti. Already, R2.5-million has been received through a South African Broadcasting Corporation-hosted telethon. The funds will be contributed to the United Nations Development Fund to be used in Haiti. In the afermath of the January earthquake, South Africa contributed R1-million to Rescue South Africa and its search-and-rescue team which visited Haiti to search for quake survivors. The International Relations Department contributed a further R2.1-million to humanitarian assistance activities of the Food and Agriculture Organisation, World Food Organisation and the International Organisation for Migration. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Late season rains thwart disaster for many Ohio crop farms in 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Thank God for the rains in August — farmers in Ohio who have not done this yet, should consider doing so promptly. Those incredibly valuable rains in mid- to late-August were the thin thread saving many fields from a total yield disaster.By early August nearly all of Ohio was suffering from varying degrees of hot and dry conditions. On the week ending Aug. 7, the growing degree day accumulation was well ahead of normal for nearly every location in Ohio monitored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, with locations in eastern Ohio leading the charge. New Philadelphia was plus 574 GDDs and Cambridge had a whopping 653 GDDs more than normal. As temperatures soared, rainfall really dropped off. The Aug. 7 NASS report reflected this trend clearly with nearly every Ohio location in a rainfall deficit compared to normal. Sydney was over nine inches of rain behind and Ashtabula was at 9.99 inches below normal, according to NASS.The situation was nearly the complete opposite of the previous year for Mike Heffelfinger in Van Wert County. In the 2015 growing season, by mid-August Heffelfinger’s farm had gotten close to 40 inches of rain. In 2016, he had gotten 2.3 inches inches of rain from the third week of May through mid-August. The conditions on either extreme in the last two years produced dismally similar tough yield situations for the farm.This year, early corn harvest reflected the tough conditions of 2016 for Heffelfinger, though it was not a total disaster.“We are seeing 140-bushel corn. I wouldn’t have guessed that a month or two ago. We are just really getting a good start with corn but in the fields we have harvested, 140 has hit it pretty close,” Heffelfinger said. “That 2.3 inches this summer gave us something. It is not anything to brag about but it is better than anticipated.”The saving grace was the soybean yield on the farm thanks in large part to the 11.5 inches of rain that fell in the area from Aug. 12 through late October.“We got two inches on Oct. 21 and we were back out in the fields four days later. It usually takes longer to get back out on the fields after a rain like that at that time of year. Because of that I think we are still shy on subsoil moisture,” Heffelfinger said. “We could run into some very poor yielding corn yet but we have had some pleasant surprises so far. The soybeans were excellent and corn could be better, but we are not going to complain after the heat and dry weather this summer. I saw a range on the yield monitor from 211 to 67 bushels in one corn field. It is amazing to watch.”It was not even in the areas of the worst stress in the state where dramatic differences in corn yields were evident. By any measure, many parts of Fairfield County were comparatively low stress in 2016 for corn production in Ohio.“We were only probably stressed for two weeks, and some of our varieties handled that little bit of stress better than others,” said Jon Miller, who farms in eastern Fairfield County. “It was not in adjoining fields, but they were close on the same farm, where we had some of our best corn averaging 239 bushels and some of our worst corn averaging in the 180s. The one field had some drainage issues, but it was still a big difference. You are talking about a 40- or 50-bushel difference on the same farm.”A couple of hybrids really stood out for the Millers.“If we would have had the right hybrid on all of our acres we would have probably had at least another 15-bushel average increase over everything. We had another hybrid that didn’t do as well for us last year and we didn’t go gangbusters planting it this year,” Miller said. “The guys that had good luck with it last year planted quite a bit this year and it did really well for them again. There are always subtle differences between hybrids but there were a couple that were pretty major on yield difference.”Even the short stretch of very hot, dry conditions for the Miller farm were enough to take the top end off of what would have otherwise been a bumper crop year for corn in 2016.“A second variety that did really well for us is more of a workhorse variety that you put in your tougher conditions. It handled the stress and tougher conditions this year and out-yielded what is considered a racehorse hybrid, even on the good ground,” Miller said. “You could pay a lot of bills if you had the right varieties planted this year.”Similar yield gaps were not uncommon in corn fields around the state, said Peter Thomison, Ohio State University corn specialist.“These are the types of years that really magnify differences among hybrids. The boring years are the ones you like because we don’t see this as much, but when you have these stressed conditions you really can magnify the variability that exists between hybrids and fields. How much of that difference is due to genetics, maturity or plant architecture? Slight differences in maturity and planting dates can make a big difference,” Thomison said. “It is possible under different growing conditions next year you could see no yield difference between those same hybrids or even a flip-flop because the way the hybrids respond to the conditions.“It was kind of the worst-case scenario this year. It was cold and wet early and then we had a frost in mid-May and had some replanting because of that. Then corn was vulnerable when the heat and dry conditions came along abruptly. I think we had 44 counties that were in moderate drought stress on the Drought Monitor for a week or two this summer. In northern Ohio there were some places looking pretty bad and in the southeast and southwest things were looking pretty good in many areas.”The details of the duration of the hot and dry conditions varied significantly but much-needed relief came statewide with August rains. The timing of these rains allowed them to have variable impacts on Ohio crops, depending on their maturity at the time.“It was remarkable that the crops did as well as they did. When the rainfall came in August, some of the later planted corn actually benefitted from those rains,” Thomison said. “In some cases you could see that it affected ear development. Sometimes it appeared that the lower half of the ear was at the dough stage and the upper half was at the milk stage. You could see different patterns of colors and starch development because that rain in August really saved the upper part of those ears. We could have otherwise had big tip dieback on a lot of these ears. Yields could have been a lot worse.”In some cases, there is speculation that the use of fungicides this year (even with little to no disease pressure in the fields) helped plant health just enough to allow the corn plants to better capitalize on the valuable August rains.“I have heard from some growers and field agronomists about the plant health benefits of fungicides this year. They didn’t have the disease pressure and they are seeing higher yields, but they are also seeing much higher moisture corn,” Thomison said. “Plant health and fungicides are a touchy issue. I have done work with this, along with plant pathologists, and it is frustrating. We have done the work for several years and not seen any benefits. Then, lo and behold, we have a year like this and we see a response. It would be nice if we knew under what conditions it worked. It is like shooting dice. You never know the year you’re going to see the benefits of these fungicides. When corn is $7 or $8 you can put it on as a risk management tool, but when corn is $3.50 it is a different story. The speculation is that the longer you keep that corn green, the more opportunity you have to extend the filling period for corn. If you kept that canopy alive longer this year it may have translated into higher yields with the rains.”Unfortunately, along with salvaging many otherwise disastrous yields, the rains in August brought with them a new set of challenges that would show up in the following weeks as harvest got started. The nearly dead corn plants that found new life were subject to a number of problems due to the unique conditions, including ear molds, sprouting and stalk quality concerns.“We had a whole range of molds. We started off thinking it was Diplodia, but some of the fields I saw had more Gibberella and some fields had Trichoderma. In all of my time here I have never seen Trichoderma as severe as it was this year in some fields.I think the ear rots are widespread around the state but they are also fairly localized,” Thomison said. “These problems have the potential to get much worse as harvest is delayed. In some fields with fairly mild problems, they could be showing more mold as we progress if harvest delays occur. Moldy ear problems just get worse until they are stored below 14%. The longer corn is out there the more it will lodge and deteriorate and contribute to the mold problems. Grain moisture is the biggest issue until it gets below freezing. With the temperature swings we have been seeing this fall we could see mold growth continue.”A number of factors contributed to the fairly widespread issue of ear molds in 2016.“Moldy ear problems were in some cases associated with the earliest planted corn. Often it was in early hybrids with early planting dates. It was hit with high temperatures during pollination and was under stress and then it was a combination of the hybrid susceptibility, maturity, the stress it received, and planting date. That is not black and white, but it is a pattern we have been seeing,” Thomison said. “A lot of the corn in our performance trials was planted after May 23. The earlier planted locations had more mold and it was more prevalent in the early hybrids. The pollination period was just a little earlier — before mid-May — and those earlier planted hybrids were more stressed. We’ve only seen mold present at one out of seven locations in our yield trials so far and lodging has been nearly absent from our fields.”Of course, with ear molds, mycotoxins can be a concern, especially when being fed to livestock.“Some of the corn that has no mold in it still can actually have elevated levels of mycotoxins too, according to OSU plant pathologists. If you are in fields with mold present you certainly want to take a second look at it before feeding,” Thomison said. “Some of the elevators and ethanol plants are looking for this right now in the counties where this has been the biggest problem.”Along with the molds, sprouting corn was more of an issue than normal this year.“We saw much more sprouting than we have in recent years. The fungi that infected the ears actuallyDiplodia. Photo by OSU Extension.stimulate the sprouting in the ear,” he said. “In some cases there were loose husks that allowed rainfall to get in while the ear was still upright and accumulate at the butt of the ear and we saw the sprouting at the butt if the ear. When we had molds at the tip of the ear sometimes we’d see the sprouting at the tip.”Another challenge that surfaced in 2016 corn was the surprising amount of damage from the western bean cutworm in supposedly resistant corn hybrids, particularly in northwest Ohio.“Western bean cutworm issues will be a major consideration because there really are not many hybrids out there with the trait that controls them and OSU entomologists are telling us we may have to consider insecticide applications in some situations to control them,” Thomison said.In terms of soybeans, the August rains made a tremendous difference with many farms statewide seeing some of their best average yields ever. Along with strong yields, though, were green stems and uneven maturation slowing harvest, splitting pods encouraging a faster harvest, and a growing concern about stink bug damage and other insect issues that showed up this year.last_img read more

Messi to wed childhood sweetheart in Rosario, Argentina

first_imgBarcelona’s Argentinian forward Lionel Messi (C), his wife Antonella Roccuzzo and sons pose with the trophy at the end of the Spanish Copa del Rey (King’s Cup) final football match FC Barcelona vs Deportivo Alaves at the Vicente Calderon stadium in Madrid on May 27, 2017.Barcelona won 3-1. / AFP PHOTO / JAVIER SORIANOFootball superstar Lionel Messi is to marry his long term partner and mother of his two children, Antonella Roccuzzo, in their hometown of Rosario on June 30, the Argentina striker revealed on Thursday.“The wedding will be held in Rosario, Argentina, on June 30,” Messi’s personal communications agency 6Pointer said.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pocari import Rivers gets clearance in time for PVL Finals MOST READ What ‘missteps’? WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games The ceremony between the five-time Ballon d’Or winner and his childhood sweetheart is to be held at Rosario cathedral and many of Messi’s Barcelona teammates are expected, chief amongst them the couple’s closest friends, Uruguay striker Luis Suarez and his wife Sofia Balbi.Messi turns 30 on June 24 and Roccuzzo is 29 and the pair have been living together for nine years and have two children, four-year-old Thiago and baby Mateo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout View commentslast_img read more

Kerry Cahill To Perform In An Evening Of Cabaret For Charity

first_imgActress Kerry Cahill (Terminator Genisys, Zoo, Hours) will be performing in An Evening of Cabaret to benefit The Kristin Brooks Hope line and its program VET2VET.Cahill said, “This program is near and dear to my heart and I wanted to do something very special for them. I have put together an amazing cast of people that are equally as supportive of the VET2VET program. It will be a fun night for all involved.”An Evening of Cabaret for Hopeline will take place at Oak 81118 Oak St. New Orleans on September 27, 2015. Doors will open at 6pm and the performance will start at 7:30pm. Tickets are $50 per person and include heavy hors d’oeuvres and two drinks. There will also be a silent auction and raffle to benefit VET2VET.Several well known actors will be taken part in An Evening of Cabaret along side Kerry Cahill. Nell Nolan, who is well- known for her thirty-years of journalistic coverage chronicling all the movers and shakers of New Orleans at the Times-Picayune and for the Advocate; Broadway and television actress Leslie Castay (NCIS; New Orleans, American Horror Story); Mandi Zirkenback; Katherine McClain, otherwise known as Judy Garland at the WWII museum, award-winning playwright and writer, John Biguenet, and Brooklyn Schaffer. Cahill said, “An Evening of Cabaret will be full of singing, performances, readings, and so much more. It will be an exciting place to be and all for a great cause.”Veterans Crisis Hotline is a program that 1) Trains veteran peer counselors 2) maintains a resource database for use by crisis centers to provide local services to veterans and 3) helps returning veterans navigate the VA mental health system. They receive about 35,000 calls per month from veterans and their families. Cahill said, “Our service men and women need someone who they can talk to without feeling like they will have a consequence for letting people know they are hurting. This is an approach to healing that works.”Kerry Cahill is an award-winning actress who grew up in a military family in rural towns of Montana, Oregon and Texas. She studied drama at Loyola University in New Orleans, the British American Drama Academy Oxford and Queen’s University Belfast. Cahill’s film break came under the director Werner Herzog in Bad Lieutenant. Today, she has been cast in blockbusters such as Terminator Genisys and the new television show Zoo. For more information about An Evening of Cabaret for Hopeline please click here.last_img read more