UVM College of Medicine names John Lunde, MD, Buttles Professor of Pathology

first_imgEdwin Bovill, M.D., professor and chair of pathology, has announced that John Lunde, M.D., associate professor of pathology and medicine, has been named the recipient of the Buttles Professorship in Pathology for 2009-2014. Established in 1984 to honor the late Ernest Hiram Buttles, M.D.’08, who served as chair of pathology and bacteriology from 1921 to 1946, the professorship recognizes a pathology faculty member for their commitment to and excellence in the teaching of pathology.Born in 1880 and raised in Brandon, Vt., Dr. Buttles received an undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont in 1901 and graduated second in the College of Medicine’s Class of 1908. According to Roy Korson, M.D., professor of pathology emeritus, Buttles was “best remembered as a teacher and model for clear thinking. His opinions were respected in the classroom as well as in his pathology practice.”Like Buttles, Lunde, who joined the UVM faculty in 1987, received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from UVM. Medical students have recognized him for his teaching excellence several times over the years. In 2007, the Class of 2009 presented Lunde with The Foundations Teaching Award, which recognizes clarity of lectures and overall outstanding teaching ability. He was also named Basic Science Teacher of the Year by the Class of 2000. Other awards he has received include the Golden Apple Award for best teacher with limited contact hours from the Classes of 1998 and 2000, as well as the Silver Stethoscope Award from the Class of 2007, given to teachers with few lecture hours, but who have made a substantial contribution to students’ education.Source: UVMlast_img read more

Starting center’s status uncertain due to hand injury suffered against New Hampshire

first_img Published on October 10, 2012 at 12:23 am Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+ Shiann Darkangelo is trying to play through a hand injury, but Syracuse is preparing for the potential of life without its starting center.“We’ll see what she can do,” SU head coach Paul Flanagan said. “She probably won’t be able to shoot like she’s been able to shoot, but maybe she can help in other ways, so we’ll see what happens and kind of go from there.”A slash on her hand and a collision in SU’s 4-3 loss to New Hampshire on Friday kept Darkangelo out of Saturday’s 5-2 loss against then-No. 10 Northeastern. Darkangelo received a cast for the lower part of her left arm and hand before practicing with it on Tuesday. Darkangelo was not made available for comment by SU Athletics. Her status remains uncertain for this weekend’s two-game set against Penn State in State College,Pa.The sophomore was last season’s third-leading scorer with 18 points, scoring seven goals and 11 assists. Darkangelo’s hard shot, crease presence and movement would be missed if she cannot play. Yet Flanagan and his players are confident others can pick up the slack.“She’s definitely one of our key players and creates a lot of offense for us, so, I mean, going into last game we knew we were taking a hit in the offensive end,” captain Holly Carrie-Mattimoe said. “So I guess a lot of us have to step up and kind of fill that role that we’re missing.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWithout Darkangelo on Saturday, the Orange struggled to link its attack through the neutral zone and into its attacking sets. Sophomore center Allie LaCombe said Darkangelo’s passing ability makes it easy for her teammates.When Darkangelo was a senior in high school, freshman defender Nicole Renault played with her for Little Caesars Under-19s. Renault is one of SU’s more composed passers, and she has an extra appreciation for Darkangelo’s positional sense.“She sticks, she’s always getting open for the pass, she’s always talking, being a good teammate,” Renault said. “If you make a good pass she’ll make sure to let you know.”Darkangelo also carries her weight on defense, back-checking on opposing defenders sneaking into the zone.LaCombe struggles skating back and keeping track of opponents on defense. But Darkangelo teaches her something new on defense every day in practice.“If I watch her then I know what to do because she’s very smart,” LaCombe said.Renault said her teammate refuses to leave her defenders out to dry. Yet Darkangelo’s hard shot may be her greatest asset to the team.More than 80 percent of goals are scored on rebounds, Flanagan said. The speed of Darkangelo’s shot produces opportunities for teammates closer to goal, an area of weakness the Orange is looking to improve before taking on a PSU team that employs a conservative defense.“When teams pack it in in front you try to get somebody off to the side and you know just getting somebody back door, that kind of thing,” Flanagan said. “So we could use her size in front of the net and down low and just getting rebounds.”At 5 feet 9 inches tall, Darkangelo is the team’s second-tallest player, and while the team could miss her physical presence around the crease, others are expected to fill the void.Renault pointed to 5-foot-2-inch forward Melissa Piacentini, who was SU’s top performer in the beginning of Saturday’s game before recording her first career assist on fellow freshman Laurie Kingsbury’s third-period goal.Flanagan said Darkangelo is trying to play, but regardless of her status for Saturday, the entire offense is expected to step up.Said Flanagan: “Whether it’s (Darkangelo) or Emily or anybody, we got to start getting some production. But I feel good about this group.” Commentslast_img read more

Ghanaian Olympian, Akwasi Frimpong, features twice in Pyeongchang finals

first_imgGhana’s first skeleton Olympian, Akwasi Frimpong, twice qualified for the finals during the International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation Pyeongchang InterContinental Cup this week in Pyeongchang, South Korea. It is the same track where Frimpong made history for his country and began his drive to become the Hope of a Billion when he competed in the 2018 Winter Olympics. Frimpong’s results this week showed just how far Frimpong has come as a skeleton athlete on the world stage. In 2018, Frimpong finished 30th out of 30 athletes.This week, Frimpong finished 19th and 20th out of 24 athletes beating countries from the Netherlands, Belgium, South Africa, Luxembourg, and New Zealand.The results come despite not having a sliding coach. As his successful sliding season wraps up, Frimpong competed in 12 races and qualified for the finals eleven times. Frimpong currently ranks 76th out of 150 skeleton athletes in the world. He can still move up in the world rankings since only 7 best races are now counted on the world rankings with one more to be added by next weekend. “I made some big improvements this year,” Frimpong said. “I’m proud of what I have accomplished, but there is still so much work ahead of me before the 2022 Olympics. I hope in the upcoming season I can find the support I need to have a sliding coach to make bigger strides for Ghana.“ Qualifying for the Olympics is going to be extremely difficult if I don’t have a sliding coach and the resources of other countries. I trust something good will happen I just have to keep working hard and stay relentless.”“For now, I plan to take a couple of days off to be with my family then start training to prepare for next season. I want to thank my head sponsor, Ghana Gas, whose support has been critical to my growth this season. “Team Murdock Hyundai from Murray, Utah made my traveling to training locally possible since 2017 and my new sponsor, Forever Living Products International has been supporting me with their amazing Aloe Vera products which help with my recovery. Finally, I have to thank everyone who has been part of the Hope of a Billion story this season.”last_img read more