UVM College of Medicine names John Lunde, MD, Buttles Professor of Pathology

first_imgEdwin Bovill, M.D., professor and chair of pathology, has announced that John Lunde, M.D., associate professor of pathology and medicine, has been named the recipient of the Buttles Professorship in Pathology for 2009-2014. Established in 1984 to honor the late Ernest Hiram Buttles, M.D.’08, who served as chair of pathology and bacteriology from 1921 to 1946, the professorship recognizes a pathology faculty member for their commitment to and excellence in the teaching of pathology.Born in 1880 and raised in Brandon, Vt., Dr. Buttles received an undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont in 1901 and graduated second in the College of Medicine’s Class of 1908. According to Roy Korson, M.D., professor of pathology emeritus, Buttles was “best remembered as a teacher and model for clear thinking. His opinions were respected in the classroom as well as in his pathology practice.”Like Buttles, Lunde, who joined the UVM faculty in 1987, received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from UVM. Medical students have recognized him for his teaching excellence several times over the years. In 2007, the Class of 2009 presented Lunde with The Foundations Teaching Award, which recognizes clarity of lectures and overall outstanding teaching ability. He was also named Basic Science Teacher of the Year by the Class of 2000. Other awards he has received include the Golden Apple Award for best teacher with limited contact hours from the Classes of 1998 and 2000, as well as the Silver Stethoscope Award from the Class of 2007, given to teachers with few lecture hours, but who have made a substantial contribution to students’ education.Source: UVMlast_img read more

Collaborating competitors: The future of CUSOs

first_imgThe sixth cooperative principle is probably the best definition of a credit union service organization, specifically:“Cooperation among cooperatives: Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.”Early CUSO models, like CU Direct Lending and CO-OP Financial Services were extremely successful because it gave access to essential products/services at an affordable price. And I have to admit I have always been smitten with the shared branch CUSO model. In my opinion that should have been our “National Brand Campaign” about the credit union difference. We work together!Then many of us became competitors with field of membership changes that included community charters that of course overlapped. In fact, one of the arguments I have heard against joining the shared branch network is, “I don’t want to send my members to my competitors.” But what if we collaborated with our competitors? continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more