Wolf Administration Approves Luzerne County Facility to Begin Medical Marijuana Production

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter October 31, 2017 Human Services,  Medical Marijuana,  Press Release,  Public Health Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that the Pennsylvania Department of Health has approved Standard Farms, LLC in White Haven, Luzerne County, to grow and process medical marijuana, keeping the program on track to deliver medical marijuana to patients next year.“Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana program is one step closer to becoming fully operational,” Governor Wolf said. “We remain on track to provide medical marijuana safely and effectively to Pennsylvanians with serious medical conditions sometime in 2018. In the coming weeks, the Department of Health expects the rest of the grower/processors to be approved to begin production.”In order to become operational, Standard Farms underwent several inspections from the Department of Health. The facilities also are fully integrated with the seed-to-sale tracking system. The grower/processors will now be able to begin accepting seeds and clones to grow medical marijuana.“We are working with patients, caregivers and physicians to make sure they are ready to participate in the program,” Acting Health Secretary and Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Patients are our first priority, and we want to get medication to them as safely and efficiently as possible.”The Medical Marijuana Program was signed into law by Governor Tom Wolf on April 17, 2016. Since that time, the department has:Completed the Safe Harbor temporary guidelines and Safe Harbor Letter application process, as well as approved more than 300 applications;Completed temporary regulations for growers/processors, dispensaries physicians and laboratories, all which have been published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin;Issued permits to grower/processors and dispensaries;Developed the Medical Marijuana Physician Workgroup;Approved three training providers for physician continuing education;Approved two laboratories to test medication before it is delivered to patients; andContinue to work with permittees to ensure they will be operational within six months.The Medical Marijuana Program became effective on May 17, 2016, and is expected to be fully implemented by 2018. The program will offer medical marijuana to patients who are residents of Pennsylvania and under a practitioner’s care for the treatment of a serious medical condition as defined by the Medical Marijuana Law.Questions about the Medical Marijuana Program can be emailed to RA-DHMedMarijuana@pa.gov. Information is also available on the Department of Health website at www.health.pa.gov.For more information, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.center_img Wolf Administration Approves Luzerne County Facility to Begin Medical Marijuana Productionlast_img read more

Wolf Administration Continues Efforts to Address PFAS Contamination

first_img August 22, 2019 Wolf Administration Continues Efforts to Address PFAS Contamination Press Release,  Public Health Horsham, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf was joined by Representative Todd Stephens and Representative Meghan Schroeder to announce new funding to help address PFAS contamination in Horsham, Warminster, Warrington, and Warwick townships.“Republican or Democrat, senator or representative, every elected official understands that clean drinking water is a critical issue,” Gov. Wolf said. “We all want Pennsylvanians to live the happiest, healthiest lives possible and today I am proud to be here to help lessen a burden for these communities that residents did not cause.”In addition, the governor renewed his call for the United States Environmental Protection Agency to establish an enforceable, nationwide drinking water standard for PFAS under the Safe Drinking Water Act.“The federal government played a big role in causing these issues and they should be stepping up in a much bigger way,” Gov. Wolf said. “We need the White House and Congress to get serious about addressing this issue.”Flanked by state and local leadership, the governor announced a $3.8 million grant to support water treatment efforts in Horsham, Warminster, Warrington, and Warwick townships. This new funding will help bolster the funding awarded over the past few years to help Warminster and Warrington address contamination, and to install the carbon filters in Horsham.“Horsham residents shouldn’t have to bear the costs of removing the federal government’s contamination from our drinking water,” said State Representative Todd Stephens. “Working together with Governor Wolf, we’ve been able to provide funds to eliminate the unfair surcharges Horsham residents have been paying to ensure their water is safe to drink.”“For years, our residents in Warminster have absorbed the cost of purchasing clean water due to the federal government’s inability to clean up its own mess. With this state funding, we will finally be able to alleviate the surcharge for this water from our ratepayers. As Warwick Township deals with similar contamination issues, we will work to ensure that this funding will assist them with needed infrastructure improvements,” said State Representative Meghan Schroeder.Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances – PFAS – are man-made chemicals resistant to heat, water and oil, and persist in the environment and the human body. PFAS are not found naturally in the environment. They have been used to make cookware, carpets, clothing, fabrics for furniture, paper packaging for food, and other materials that are resistant to water, grease, or stains. They are also used in firefighting foams and in a number of industrial processes.In September 2018, Governor Wolf announced the establishment of a multi-agency PFAS Action Team and other executive actions to address growing national concerns surrounding PFAS. The PFAS Action Team places Pennsylvania at the forefront of states taking proactive action to address PFAS and other water contaminants.“I would like to thank the local officials for the steps they’ve taken to address the PFAS contamination in Horsham, Warminster, Warrington, and Warwick townships,” said Gov. Wolf. “We’re here in Horsham today, but we know PFAS was likely used at other airports, military bases, and manufacturing facilities, and I am committed to identifying those locations and supporting any necessary cleanup so today’s residents don’t have to bear a costly burden of the past.”In June, the Department of Environmental Protection began a statewide sampling plan to identify PFAS-impacted drinking water. Preliminary results from the sampling will be released in the fall. Additionally, the Department of Health has hired a state toxicologist, and the Department of Environmental Protection is finalizing a contract for specialized toxicology services to move forward with setting a state limit for PFAS in drinking water to establish a cleanup plan that will result in every Pennsylvanian having water free from PFAS contamination.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Prairie View looks to extend streak vs UAPB

first_img February 21, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditPrairie View (14-11, 10-2) vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff (3-22, 2-11)H.O. Clemmons Arena, Pine Bluff, Arkansas; Saturday, 8 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Prairie View looks for its fifth straight conference win against Arkansas-Pine Bluff. Prairie View’s last SWAC loss came against the Alabama State Hornets 52-49 on Feb. 1. Arkansas-Pine Bluff lost 60-52 at Alcorn State in its most recent game. BIG MEN ON CAMPUS: Arkansas-Pine Bluff’s Markedric Bell has averaged nine points and 4.5 rebounds while Dequan Morris has put up 8.5 points and 4.3 rebounds. For the Panthers, Gerard Andrus has averaged 14.8 points and 5.1 rebounds while Devonte Patterson has put up 11.4 points and 4.8 rebounds.AWESOME ANDRUS: In 25 appearances this season, Prairie View’s Andrus has shot 55 percent.WINLESS WHEN: Arkansas-Pine Bluff is 0-22 this year when it scores 60 points or fewer and 3-0 when it scores at least 61.COLD SPELL: Arkansas-Pine Bluff has lost its last six home games, scoring an average of 50.8 points while giving up 61.7.DID YOU KNOW: The Prairie View defense has forced opponents into turnovers on an impressive 24.6 percent of all possessions, which ranks the Panthers 11th among Division I teams. The Arkansas-Pine Bluff offense has turned the ball over on 26.9 percent of its possessions (ranking the Golden Lions 353rd, nationally).___ Prairie View looks to extend streak vs UAPBcenter_img For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Associated Press last_img read more

Syracuse uses walk-on talent to help raise profile of program

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Amy Ludovici was walking across the Syracuse Quad when she heard someone quickly jogging up from behind her. Andrea Buch tapped Ludovici on the shoulder and handed her a flier.“’Hey, you look like a great athlete,’” Ludovici recalls Buch, then a Syracuse assistant rowing coach, telling her. “’You should come to this.’”On the Quad next to them was a boat. The same type the SU rowing team practices with and races in. Around it were about 10 athletes and assistant coaches all watching and tracking down women they thought looked athletic.The purpose was to find the next crop of Syracuse rowing walk-ons.“Leaving competitive sports, I needed, I missed that involvement in something, or being with other people with a similar mindset,” Ludovici said. “It didn’t take much convincing at all.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLudovici — a basketball player in high school — soon became one of about 60 women to be invited to try out for SU’s rowing team. Many had no background in the sport. Some had what it took to make the roster. Others did not.Now a senior, Ludovici said she’s the only remaining walk-on member of her 2011 class to be on the team. That’s because the team has consistently grown more competitive, with athletes who had the ability in previous years harshly being cut for younger, better candidates. Still, many of the athletes don’t come in with a background in the sport.Now, two regattas into its spring season — the latest one being Sunday in Clemson, South Carolina — the fall tryout cycle will once again get to show its benefits on the water.“We’re looking for women who are unafraid to go,” head coach Justin Moore said. “Women who like to train and women who really want to be part of an environment where the team is bigger than them, their crew is bigger than them. Not somebody who wants to be the star.”It’s a roster of 56 with only 20 scholarships to earn. Moore recruits athletes he thinks fit the mold, but many must come just from trying people out. The 60 quickly whittles down to 30, Moore says, noting that half of them “self-select” while the rest continue the tryout process that lasts for more than a month, and a crop of walk-ons forms.And those 20 scholarships — the most allowed in Division I rowing — become a source of competition to earn. Ludovici walked on when she was a freshman. But as a senior, she’s getting a full ride — as has everyone else in the first varsity eight boat. Moore said he likes to at least give partial scholarships, but make that top boat a reason for competition for everyone else.“Rowing is a late onset sport. Whereas like swimming and gymnastics are really early onset sports,” Moore said. “Fifty percent of our women were pretty good athletes in other sports and rowing was just the path that they chose because I think it provided the most opportunity.”But those opportunities are now becoming fewer and farther between. Ludovici said more and more the coaches have had to cut athletes that have already been on the roster.“The coaches kind of had to step in and say, ‘These are hard and fast standards and no matter what, if you can’t make them, we’re sorry we can’t have you back,’” Ludovici said. “There have been more substantial cuts as the years have gone on.“Some people do everything they can to try and make this team, and it’s just not enough.”One was Ludovici’s sister, Mary Ludovici, who didn’t have the same 5-foot-11 frame. Ludovici said her sister was upset to not make the roster, but instead became a captain on the dance team.It’s a ruthless yet extremely calculated effort to find the best athletes. Assistant coach Jim Lister has been yelled at for trying to take all the best Australian athletes when he’s recruiting Down Under.He spent 17 days there in February, reaching out to rowers he’d heard of and keeping his eye out for more.“They’ve been coming up to us and saying ‘Hey, there’s a girl that I rowed with that just made the junior national team,’” Lister said. “So we’re getting some of that. And the other part is we’re going down to the boathouses and jumping in the launch with the coaches and establishing a relationship.”But for the Orange’s 11 international rowers, or ones plucked straight off the Quad, the expectation is the same. Moore says his sport, like anything, is a craft. He speaks in inspirational clichés. And he trusts in the Malcolm Gladwell belief that you can become great at anything if you devote 10,000 hours to it.He knows that the Saturday morning regatta doesn’t draw the crowd of the Friday night football game in the Carrier Dome. He knows it takes a special type of person to set their alarm to a time that starts with 4 a.m.And Moore is on a perpetual, never-ending search to find that type of person, wherever they may come from and in whatever form.“Unlike football, unlike basketball, unlike sports with defense, our sport is just physical,” Moore said. “Nobody is trying to prevent us from trying to achieve our goal. It is just how hard can you go. How well trained are you, how physically prepared are you? How technically proficient? And how much are you willing to hurt?“If you can get somebody to engage incredibly deeply for a long period of time, they’re going to become excellent at it.” Comments Published on April 19, 2015 at 11:01 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more