Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Mayo Clinic join group to study quality and cost of health care

first_imgSix of the nation’s leading health care systems today announced a first-of-its-kind collaboration to improve health care quality while reducing costs.Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Cleveland Clinic, Denver Health, Geisinger Health System, Intermountain Healthcare, and Mayo Clinic will join The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice to share data on outcomes, quality, and costs across a range of common and costly conditions and treatments. The group will determine best practices for delivering care for these conditions and will rapidly disseminate actionable recommendations to providers and health systems across the United States. In addition to achieving better quality and outcomes, the Collaborative intends to improve the efficiency of standard clinical care delivery to reduce the per capita cost in these conditions and to keep costs in pace with the consumer price index.The Collaborative will initially focus on eight conditions and treatments for which costs have been increasing rapidly in recent years and for which there are wide variations in quality and outcomes across the country. The conditions and treatments will be: knee replacement, diabetes, heart failure, asthma, weight loss surgery, labor and delivery, spine surgery, and depression, which together amount to hundreds of billions of dollars in direct medical costs each year.‘Increasing the value of the health care we receive, by improving the measurable outcomes and reducing the cost for delivery, is the goal of accountable health care organizations,’ said Thomas A. Colacchio, MD, president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health and a member of the executive committee of the new collaborative. ‘While a number of different collaborations between our institutions have been in place for some time, this particular initiative is an important step in generating and sharing quality and cost information at a sufficient level to more rapidly produce a significant impact on the lives of many patients as we work to achieve the healthiest population possible.’The six health care systems, with a combined patient population of more than 10 million people, will share data on outcomes and clinical protocols for the selected conditions and treatments to arrive at optimal care models which can then be implemented by many other health care systems. The Collaborative aims to see these best practices replicated across the country. The Dartmouth Institute will coordinate data sharing and analysis, and report results back to the Collaborative members to inform development of best practices. The Dartmouth Institute has twenty years of experience analyzing Medicare claims data and disseminating the findings. This same expertise will be applied to the work of the Collaborative.‘There is broad support from other health care systems across the country who want to participate in the work of the Collaborative,’ said Dr. James Weinstein, Director of The Dartmouth Institute. ‘It would be enormously valuable to have the broadest geographic and demographic representation in the sharing of outcomes and experience.’The Collaborative will first analyze Total Knee Replacement, a procedure that is performed more than 300,000 times a year in the U.S., with a cost that ranges on average from $16,000 to $24,000 per surgery. Simultaneously, Collaborative partners will build the metrics to study the care of the other selected conditions at their centers and arrive at best practices. Work to define best practices in diabetes and heart failure care will begin early in 2011.‘If we know that the treatment path for diabetes at one institution results in better clinical outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and lower overall costs, then there is knowledge to be shared and replicated in other institutions’ said Dr. Robert Nesse, Chief Executive Officer of Mayo Clinic Health System and member of Mayo Clinic’s Board of Trustees. ‘We need to learn from each other and put systems in place that ensure that every patient gets the very best, most appropriate care, every time.’Developing models to reduce cost, while improving quality, is only part of the equation. An equally important goal is to impact the clinical care of patients across the country by disseminating these models quickly and working with providers and health systems to adapt them to local conditions. ‘In my view, the most critical piece of this initiative is the transfer of knowledge to other health systems,’ said Dr. Glenn Steele, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Geisinger Health System. ‘We need to aggressively implement a rapid learning network to disseminate our work and assist other systems in implementing these best practices, especially the highest cost systems.’Through The Dartmouth Institute, the Collaborative will also draw on the work of the Center for Health Care Delivery Science, established at Dartmouth College in May, 2010 and dedicated to research, education, collaboration, implementation, and public outreach to improve health and health care for patients, their families, providers, and populations.Source: Dartmouth-Hitchcock. 12.15.2010###last_img read more

Syracuse uses walk-on talent to help raise profile of program

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Amy Ludovici was walking across the Syracuse Quad when she heard someone quickly jogging up from behind her. Andrea Buch tapped Ludovici on the shoulder and handed her a flier.“’Hey, you look like a great athlete,’” Ludovici recalls Buch, then a Syracuse assistant rowing coach, telling her. “’You should come to this.’”On the Quad next to them was a boat. The same type the SU rowing team practices with and races in. Around it were about 10 athletes and assistant coaches all watching and tracking down women they thought looked athletic.The purpose was to find the next crop of Syracuse rowing walk-ons.“Leaving competitive sports, I needed, I missed that involvement in something, or being with other people with a similar mindset,” Ludovici said. “It didn’t take much convincing at all.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLudovici — a basketball player in high school — soon became one of about 60 women to be invited to try out for SU’s rowing team. Many had no background in the sport. Some had what it took to make the roster. Others did not.Now a senior, Ludovici said she’s the only remaining walk-on member of her 2011 class to be on the team. That’s because the team has consistently grown more competitive, with athletes who had the ability in previous years harshly being cut for younger, better candidates. Still, many of the athletes don’t come in with a background in the sport.Now, two regattas into its spring season — the latest one being Sunday in Clemson, South Carolina — the fall tryout cycle will once again get to show its benefits on the water.“We’re looking for women who are unafraid to go,” head coach Justin Moore said. “Women who like to train and women who really want to be part of an environment where the team is bigger than them, their crew is bigger than them. Not somebody who wants to be the star.”It’s a roster of 56 with only 20 scholarships to earn. Moore recruits athletes he thinks fit the mold, but many must come just from trying people out. The 60 quickly whittles down to 30, Moore says, noting that half of them “self-select” while the rest continue the tryout process that lasts for more than a month, and a crop of walk-ons forms.And those 20 scholarships — the most allowed in Division I rowing — become a source of competition to earn. Ludovici walked on when she was a freshman. But as a senior, she’s getting a full ride — as has everyone else in the first varsity eight boat. Moore said he likes to at least give partial scholarships, but make that top boat a reason for competition for everyone else.“Rowing is a late onset sport. Whereas like swimming and gymnastics are really early onset sports,” Moore said. “Fifty percent of our women were pretty good athletes in other sports and rowing was just the path that they chose because I think it provided the most opportunity.”But those opportunities are now becoming fewer and farther between. Ludovici said more and more the coaches have had to cut athletes that have already been on the roster.“The coaches kind of had to step in and say, ‘These are hard and fast standards and no matter what, if you can’t make them, we’re sorry we can’t have you back,’” Ludovici said. “There have been more substantial cuts as the years have gone on.“Some people do everything they can to try and make this team, and it’s just not enough.”One was Ludovici’s sister, Mary Ludovici, who didn’t have the same 5-foot-11 frame. Ludovici said her sister was upset to not make the roster, but instead became a captain on the dance team.It’s a ruthless yet extremely calculated effort to find the best athletes. Assistant coach Jim Lister has been yelled at for trying to take all the best Australian athletes when he’s recruiting Down Under.He spent 17 days there in February, reaching out to rowers he’d heard of and keeping his eye out for more.“They’ve been coming up to us and saying ‘Hey, there’s a girl that I rowed with that just made the junior national team,’” Lister said. “So we’re getting some of that. And the other part is we’re going down to the boathouses and jumping in the launch with the coaches and establishing a relationship.”But for the Orange’s 11 international rowers, or ones plucked straight off the Quad, the expectation is the same. Moore says his sport, like anything, is a craft. He speaks in inspirational clichés. And he trusts in the Malcolm Gladwell belief that you can become great at anything if you devote 10,000 hours to it.He knows that the Saturday morning regatta doesn’t draw the crowd of the Friday night football game in the Carrier Dome. He knows it takes a special type of person to set their alarm to a time that starts with 4 a.m.And Moore is on a perpetual, never-ending search to find that type of person, wherever they may come from and in whatever form.“Unlike football, unlike basketball, unlike sports with defense, our sport is just physical,” Moore said. “Nobody is trying to prevent us from trying to achieve our goal. It is just how hard can you go. How well trained are you, how physically prepared are you? How technically proficient? And how much are you willing to hurt?“If you can get somebody to engage incredibly deeply for a long period of time, they’re going to become excellent at it.” Comments Published on April 19, 2015 at 11:01 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more

Sheep industry leadership school returns to Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Participants 20 years of age or older who are interested in all aspects of sheep production and marketing have until May 1, to register for the July 10-14, 2016, Howard Wyman Sheep Industry Leadership School being held at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. This intense four-day program will incorporate site tours of exceptional Ohio sheep operations with the Lamb 509 short course taught by Roger High and Dr. Henry Zerby of OSU.In addition to the site tours, participants will spend one full day in the OSU Meat Lab learning about carcass grading, performing hands-on fabrication of carcasses and processing meat products.Interested individuals must complete an application form. Applications will be reviewed and 32 participants will be selected to attend the 2016 school. Though there is no fee to apply, a registration fee of $200 is required if accepted. The National Lamb Feeders Association will provide meals, lodging and tour-related expenses. Participants are responsible for their own travel to and from the school location.Applicants may apply electronically by visiting www.nlfa-sheep.org/leadership.html or an application may be downloaded and returned by mail or fax. Applications must be received by May 1. For more information, call the NLFA office at 503-364-5462 or email info@nlfa-sheep.org.last_img read more

TREVOR NOAH RETURNING TO MONTREAL FOR 2019 JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL

first_imgFor the second year in a row, Montreal comedy fans will be treated to the musings of The Daily Show host Trevor Noah, who’s returning to perform at the Just For Laughs festival.Noah is bringing his arena tour, Loud and Clear, to the Bell Centre July 26. The South African comedian hosted two galas at the festival last year.Also performing at the 37th edition of the festival: Australian standup comedian Jim Jefferies, who will host two galas, British comedian Jimmy Carr, whose latest Netflix special debuted on Tuesday, and Cristela Alonzo, who will host the Ethnic Show. Login/Register With: Advertisement Trevor Noah, host of The Daily Show, is the first big-name comedian attached to the 2019 Just For Laughs festival. (Evan Agostini/Invision via AP) Advertisement Twittercenter_img More acts will be announced in the coming weeks. The festival runs from July 10 to 28.In 2018, Howie Mandel and a Los Angeles-based talent and literary agency bought the struggling festival.Its future was uncertain after sexual assault allegations involving co-founder and president Gilbert Rozon emerged during the #MeToo movement.Rozon is facing one count of indecent assault and one count of rape, charges that were part of the Criminal Code when the alleged events occurred in 1979.His case will be back in court April 25, when a judge is expected to decide whether his trial will be held in front of a jury or a judge alone. Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

Rep Lucido announces annual summer reading contest

first_img17May Rep. Lucido announces annual summer reading contest PHOTO NOTE: 2016 Contest Winner Amber Watta of Shelby Township, and Rep. Peter J. LucidoPHOTO NOTE: 2016 Contest Winner Amber Watta of Shelby Township, her family, and Rep. Peter J. Lucido Categories: Lucido Newscenter_img State Rep. Peter Lucido is kicking off his annual summer reading contest for local elementary school students. The winner will join Rep. Lucido at the Capitol to serve as an honorary state representative for the day.Rep. Lucido hopes the contest will encourage students to keep their minds active and improve reading skills during the summer months.“Taking some time over the summer to read is vital for our bright and talented students,” said Lucido of Shelby Township. “The contest is about more than preparing them for the coming school year; it is about instilling a habit which will benefit them for the rest of their academic career and beyond.”Students in grades one through five who are residents of the 36th house district are eligible to participate. The 36th house district encompasses the Townships of Shelby, Washington, Bruce and the Village of Romeo. Participants track their reading on special bookmarks which have been distributed to schools and local libraries. Students can drop off completed bookmarks in boxes provided at local libraries before September 1, 2017. There is no limit to the amount of bookmarks that can be submitted, as long as each bookmark is completed.Rep. Lucido will draw from the boxes to determine the winner, who will be invited to the Capitol with their family to act as state representative for a day.“This is one of my favorite parts of being your state legislator,” Lucido said. “During my first term we had great participation and I enjoyed spending the day with last year’s winner, Amber Watta of Shelby Township. Amber was sworn in as a junior representative, participated in a mock committee hearing, and we toured the Capitol with her family.”Contest bookmarks are available to download and print on www.RepPeterLucido.com and are available throughout the summer at the following participating libraries;Shelby Township Library, 51680 Van Dyke in Shelby Township,Graubner Library, 65821 Van Dyke in Washington,Kezar Branch Library, 107 Church St. in Romeo.For questions regarding the contest, please contact Rep. Lucido at (888) MICH-REP, or by email at PeterLucido@house.mi.gov.last_img read more

Rep Maturens real estate transfer tax fairness measure signed into law

first_img State Rep. David Maturen’s plan providing equity related to a tax charged when people sell real estate is now part of Michigan law.A seller whose home has lost value generally does not have to pay Michigan’s real estate transfer tax. Maturen’s new law – signed by Gov. Rick Snyder this week – will extend the same exemption to someone who bought vacant land, builds a house, and then sells the house.“This change addresses a circumstance that is rare, but was not adequately addressed in previous law,” said Maturen, of Vicksburg. “This is an equitable and fair solution that treats all sellers who have lost value in a home the same – whether they bought land with a home already on it, or bought vacant land and then built a home.”The legislation allows a property’s original state equalized value to be determined at the time a certificate of occupancy is issued for the residence. The home must qualify for a principal residence exemption.House Bill 4643 is now Public Act 172.### Categories: Maturen News,News 12Jun Rep. Maturen’s real estate transfer tax fairness measure signed into lawlast_img read more

Red Bee media will provide additional broadcast se

first_imgRed Bee media will provide additional broadcast services, including access services, rich metadata and sports analysis software Piero, as part of an expanded deal with BT Sport.The firm first announced in April that it had been chosen by BT to provide playout, channel and media management services for BT’s new live sports offering, which went live this month.Red Bee, which was acquired by Ericsson earlier this year, will now also  provide live and pre-recorded subtitling and audio description services, rich metadata services and its 3D sports analysis software, Piero.last_img read more