Former Owner Buys Back Sarasota Gulfshore Life Magazines

first_imgCurtCo Publishing has sold Sarasota and Gulfshore Life magazines to Dan Denton, who sold Gulfshore Media to CurtCo in 2004.Financial terms of the deal, which closed late Thursday afternoon, were not disclosed.In connection with the acquisition, Denton has formed Gulfshore Media LLC which is headquartered in both Sarasota and Naples, Florida. The new company will maintain many of the magazines’ current employees. UPDATE: Chris Schulz, who served as president of Gulfshore Media under CurtCo, tells FOLIO: that he will assist with the transition for about a month on a consultancy basis but will leave the company after that time. UPDATE2: Gulfshore Media’s creative director and IT manager also will be leaving the company following its acquisition, Denton says. Denton also owns Florida Home Media LLC, which publishes the Homebuyer magazines as well as Orlando Home & Leisure. Florida Home Media COO Randy Noles will serve in the same capacity at Gulfshore Media, the company says.According to CurtCo CEO Bill Curtis, the company is looking to divest its regional magazines in an attempt to “build upon the amazing growth we are experiencing at Robb Report this year. With our nine international editions and our new investment plans for building an exciting array of online initiatives, we have plenty to keep us busy.”CurtCo also is finalizing deals to sell San Diego and Art & Antiques. According to sources, those deals are expected to close soon.CurtCo was represented in the deal by DeSilva + Phillips. Regional Media Advisors represented Denton and Gulfshore Media.[Editor’s Note: This story previously suggested that Denton launched Sarasota and Gulfshore Life. He founded Sarasota, but not Gulfshore Life.]last_img read more

Article 13 EU countries approve copyright directive

first_img Share your voice Internet Services Tech Industry Tags The EU has adopted Article 13, among other reforms. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images European countries approved sweeping reforms to copyright law on Monday after the European Parliament voted to adopt the new legislation last month.The EU Copyright Directive will protect and govern how copyrighted content posted online, bringing outdated rules up to scratch for the internet age. The law has been hotly debated both by politicians and the wider tech community, with some of the world’s biggest companies taking a strong stance against the legislation — in particular a section known as Article 13.Article 13 dictates that anyone sharing copyrighted content must get permission from rights owners — or at least have made the best possible effort to get permission — before doing so. In order to do this, it’s thought that internet services and social networks will have no choice but to build and enforce upload filters and generally apply a more heavy-handed approach to moderating what users post online.For proponents of digital rights, the approval of the directive comes as a huge blow after over a year of campaigning to uphold what they see as the integrity of the internet. Following the European Parliament vote in March, there was hope that enough key countries might try to block the directive that it wouldn’t pass, but ultimately it didn’t face enough opposition on a national level (all EU legislation faces a final vote by member states before it can pass into law).Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Finland and Sweden voted against adopting the directive, whereas Belgium, Estonia and Slovenia abstained. In total 19 countries voted to approve the legislation.”This is a deeply disappointing result which will have a far-reaching and negative impact on freedom of speech and expression online,” said Catherine Stihler, chief executive of rights group the Open Knowledge Foundation in a statement. “The controversial crackdown was not universally supported, and I applaud those national governments which took a stand and voted against it.”But not every was disappointed by Monday’s result. A coalition of organizations representing news publishers in Europe celebrated the adoption of the directive. “This important reform will help make the EU copyright regime fit for the digital age without stifling digital innovation,” said Christian Van Thillo, chairman of the European Publishers Council in a statement.center_img 2 Commentslast_img read more