Action Codes Continue to Gain Traction in Magazines

first_imgQR codes and their ilk continue to rise in usage by publishers, according to a study out today by mobile marketing and technology services company Nellymoser. In the second quarter, the top 100 magazines by circulation featured a variety of mobile action codes in 2,200 instances, a 61 percent jump over the first quarter this year.The study doesn’t track scan rates or actions taken post scan, but the printing of QR codes, digital watermarks and other action codes is definitely on the rise—in the first quarter of 2011, there was a comparatively modest 352 codes printed. And, at the end of first half 2012, the number of action codes printed is already coming close to the 4,468 that were printed during all of 2011.See Also: Mobile Action Codes Increased 439 Percent in Top 100 Mags Last YearWhile the instances of codes appearing in the top 100 magazines went from 1,365 to 2,200 the number specifically appearing in advertisements also jumped, going from 5 percent of ad pages in the second quarter 2011 to 10 percent this year. For the first time all 100 of the top magazines featured at least one action code. And of all the codes, QR codes are still the most prevalent, with more than 80 percent market share since December 2011. The beauty, health and automotive categories accounted for 49 percent of all action codes in the second quarter, with automotive more than doubling its use of codes between the first and second quarter. Video continues to be the most common use for action codes, with 40 percent of codes leading to a product demo, behind the scenes look or some other clip. Sweepstakes and social sharing were also heavily used at 20 percent of instances. For more, see the full study here.Action Codes by QuarterSource: Nellymoser, Inc.last_img read more

The iPad app making life easier for people in public housing

first_img For the disability community, tech is the great equalizer The app helping the homeless take back control Men won’t talk about mental health and it’s literally killing them Related stories 0 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See It Review • Apple iPad 2018 review: The iPad for everyone Post a comment $249 With every FACS officer responsible for between 350 and 450 properties, the department was previously only visiting 30 percent of its public housing tenants in a given year. After the app was launched across the state in April 2018, the department conducted one third of its yearly visits — more than 20,000 interactions — in just 60 days.Former FACS client services officer Roger Mclean helped develop the app and knows the problem faced by front-line public housing workers too well. For each public housing visit he used to conduct, he says he would spend upwards of three hours printing out forms, rifling through case files and doing dry paperwork. For a person who got into the job to help people, the bulk of his time was spent on data entry. “It was horrible and very time consuming,” he says. “Now, we’re not rushing.”With only an iPad in tow, case workers can now spend time actually speaking to tenants in their homes, where issues are easier to identify and difficult conversations can be conducted in privacy. For elderly residents and people living with a disability the focus on in-home interactions is game-changing.  “Before, we spent 100 percent of our time on 10 percent of our clients,” says Lance Carden, director of customer service and business improvement at FACS.But for Carden, the biggest change has been a shift from putting out fires to actually engaging with people in the community who need it most. “We miss out on early intervention if we’re not visiting everybody. And we’re missing that social and human element.”Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech’s role in providing new kinds of accessibility.The Smartest Stuff: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you, and the things around you, smarter. $329 $249 Share your voice See Itcenter_img See it Apple Amazon Mentioned Above Apple iPad 2018 (space gray, 32GB) Culture See It Best Buy Family and Community Services officer Roger Mclean talks through the Ivy app with Kate McDonnell. Ian Knighton/CNET For millions around the world, public housing offers the promise of a much-needed roof overhead.But the reality of public housing can be grim, and problems that start small can often become bureaucratic nightmares.That might be a case of waiting weeks to get a broken door fixed or having to file repeated complaints about rowdy neighbours. But issues can be left to fester if councils ignore public housing tenants. And in some cases, as the world saw with the massive fire at London’s Grenfell Tower housing complex in 2017, that can have tragic consequences. While governments can be notoriously slow to adapt, one community housing provider is using tech to catch potential problems before they become big issues, making life easier for some of the most vulnerable people in society.  That solution is the Ivy app.Created by the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) in Australia, this iOS app was developed to cut out the endless paperwork case workers and community housing residents need to complete to get basic things done. It lets case workers fill property condition reports and take photos directly on an iPad, while also accessing family records, past incidents or safety issues and recent rent and water bills. Residents can complete forms and make payments on the spot, without having to visit a FACS office or wait an age on the phone to get connected to a call centre. And it’s all done through an iPad, which holds records of all the properties and families a case worker deals with, letting them map out appointments and access any information with a tap of the screen.  facs-apple-ivy-app-4Enlarge ImageThe Ivy app lets public housing residents pay bills, update records and get immediate referrals for help around their home.  Ian Knighton/CNET A simple tech update might seem like a no-brainer. But for Kate McDonnell, who lives in public housing with her five children in inner-city Sydney, the Ivy app has been a huge help. “Before, paperwork got lost … things were falling by the wayside,” she says. Case workers were “overloaded” with admin, and when she did actually get home visits, it was often a new case worker each time.Now, when she has issues, she doesn’t need to wrangle her two young children to get to a FACS centre while the other kids are in school — everything is done through the iPad. And when her case worker visits her house, “I know who they are.” $249 Tags Apple iPadlast_img read more

Ceasefires Bridgeford Laments De Sousa Resignation

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, Baltimore AFRO Editor, syoes@afro.comAfter a little more than two months in the chair, Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa resigned this week in the wake of three federal misdemeanor charges of not filing income taxes in 2013, 2014 and 2015.However, it seems abundantly clear to many that there is much more connected to De Sousa’s departure from the Baltimore Police Department (BPD), than taxes.Baltimore AFRO reporter Stephen Janis writes this week:“WBAL-TV reported May 15 that federal prosecutors had issued subpoenas to the city finance department for records related to De Sousa’s work history going back almost a decade. The documents sought pay stubs, travel records, personnel files and internal investigations…There are concerns that the subpoenas coupled with the motions filed by prosecutors stating that De Sousa was under investigation for other federal crimes, is a sign of other charges are forthcoming. Particularly since the prosecutors handling De Sousa’s case are the same duo that brought down the Gun Trace Task Force.”Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)Ultimately, whether the 30 year veteran of the BPD was forced to resign because of taxes, or something far more insidious, the bottom line is De Sousa, the eighth BPD commissioner in 18 years, is out.Erricka Bridgeford, the leader and co-founder of the Baltimore Ceasefire 365, the grassroots anti-violence movement, is not happy about De Sousa’s exit.“I’m disappointed that the commissioner resigned. In relation to your job: I don’t care if you are unorganized in your own finances. It’s not my business if you cheat on your wife. When you show up at work, how well do you do your job? That’s what I care about,” wrote Bridgeford in a Facebook post on May 16.“I want a world where our current system of policing is dismantled and rebuilt, based on “power with” the community. But, in the meantime, we need people in BPD who really do their best, given the effed up system.”Some may disagree with Bridgeford’s assertion that she doesn’t “care if you are unorganized in your own finances.” And they may take issue with her not caring whether or not the police commissioner, or any other public servant, cheats on their spouse. But, I would take issue with anybody who doesn’t believe Baltimore’s criminal justice system and specifically, the Baltimore Police Department is “effed up.” And I think there is consensus that we want our leaders to “do their best.” And Bridgeford believes De Sousa was doing his best confronted with a dire situation within the BPD and our city.“Up close, I saw what Darryl De Sousa was doing. I saw him be more transparent with grassroots leaders than any previous commissioner. I saw him work with grassroots leaders to help keep people from getting killed, in some of Baltimore’s darkest hours in the last month. I saw him care about Baltimore, not just with his words, but with his actions. I saw him be open to feedback. I saw him be responsive to residents and help with things they needed,” Bridgeford added.“Nobody is perfect. If the places I fail in my personal life ever became public information, people would be out here hunting for my head…regardless of how good I am at what I do. I’m not saying I agree with De Sousa’s every strategy…because I disagree with a lot of policing strategies. But, given what the policing system currently is, the man was doing his best. He was someone I trusted in that position.”And I trust Bridgeford’s opinion and her leadership on this and she’s not the only person whose opinion I trust who backs the former commissioner.Baltimore took a big loss this week, now that De Sousa is out of the chair.Sean Yoes is the Baltimore editor of the AFRO and host and executive producer of the AFRO First Edition, which airs Monday and Friday at 5 p.m. on the AFRO’s Facebook page.last_img read more

Rainfall likely in North Bengal districts soon South Bengal to remain dry

first_imgKolkata: The Meteorological Centre at Alipore has predicted that North Bengal districts may witness slight rainfall in the next few days, while the South Bengal districts are likely to stay dry.The temperature in the city may go down by a few notches. The lowest temperature in the city on Monday remained at 18.3 degree Celsius, which is 4 degrees above normal. The mercury may slide down for the next couple of days and then again start to climb up. A sudden drop in the temperature will have no major impact on the overall cold condition in the South Bengal districts, a weather official said on Monday. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAccording to the weather office, a low pressure trough has formed over some parts of Uttar Pradesh and Chhattisgarh, as a result of which the flow of northwesterly wind has been interrupted. It may also bring some rainfall in the North Bengal districts. In South Bengal districts, the sky may remain partly cloudy during daytime. The people may witness misty morning in the next few days, which will disappear as the day progresses. After the low pressure trough becomes weak and its impact ceases, the mercury will again continue to soar up, paving the way for the advent of spring. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseThe Met office also predicted that temperature in all the South Bengal districts will be rising from early February and with this, the winter season will be bidding farewell. The prediction also says that the days will generally remain warm while the nights may be comparatively cold. It has been learnt that the people in North Bengal districts may continue to feel a cold condition for a few more days, as the temperature in some places may hover around 10-12 degree Celsius.last_img read more

Are You Living in a Digital Bubble This Flowchart Will Tell You

first_imgJune 11, 2016 Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. The internet is an example — for better or worse — of the freedom of expression. Yet, people find ways to insulate themselves on social media sites and elsewhere on the web.People might unintentionally find themselves in a “filter bubble” — that is, only reading and / or engaging with content that confirms their views and opinions. Consider, for instance, what sites you head to for news (besides Entrepreneur, of course), if you use anti-tracking software and  the types of posts and comments you put online. All of these aspects of your digital life might be signs of being in a filter bubble.The digital echo chamber can lead people to stop expanding their horizons and learning new information. Therefore, Hyper Island, a company that focuses on educational programs and courses as well as innovation consulting for companies, put together an infographic to help raise awareness of these filter bubbles. Check out the flowchart below to find out the level of insulation you experience online.Click to EnlargeRelated: Is Workplace Culture Overrated? (Infographic) Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 1 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

Investors are Pouring Cash Into AI Startups Focused on Health Care

first_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. A recent report from CB Insights found that healthcare Artificial Intelligence startups have raised $4.3 billion across 576 funding rounds in the last five years – more than any other sector. Investment flowing into building AI that works with people to tackle healthcare issues will continue globally. Meanwhile, finding sustainable answers to tragic conditions like Alzheimer’s Disease will require accurately kept health records to advance progress — and take the willing participation of people whose lives are fatally impacted by the disease. The party ultimately responsible for finding the answer to Alzheimer’s might not be human — or at least, the effort to rid the world of the disease may not be fully a human one.Artificial Intelligence presents the medical field with new opportunities to use learnings from existing and newly created data sets to solve complex human issues over the next few years. The technology’s complementary utility for health science and medical research offers new opportunities to unearth minuscule clues from individual patient histories that lead to global breakthroughs. AI has the potential to serve as a natural partner for medical researchers and professionals who spend careers combing through records to uncover trends and anomalies.Related: AI Is Transforming Healthcare as We Know It. Here’s a Look at the Future — and the Opportunities for Entrepreneurs.AI helps people find medical answers.As an industry, health science is beginning to realize the full benefits of using precision medicine to treat disease. Early success stories include making progress in cancer detection and uncovering potential health indicators from medical histories and DNA analysis. The underlying idea of using AI for health science, in particular, is to look at people’s specific genetic or molecular profiles and determine what personalized treatment works best on a case-by-case basis.In the coming years, successfully advancing precision health science will depend on collecting and storing data representing diverse patient populations. It will also rely on the health science sector’s ability to develop sophisticated AI and machine learning algorithms that mine massive amounts of data to answer very specific healthcare questions. Questions like: how do we find the indicators hidden in countless health records? Which genetic variants matter? Why does one disease impact a patient and not someone with a similar genetic makeup? AI can serve as as a means to helping the health science sector answer some of these questions, analyze specific factors with precision and bring clarity to patients earlier in the diagnosis discovery process.Related: Wonders Artificial Intelligence is Doing For The Healthcare SectorAI’s real world impact across health sectors.AI’s real world impact on health science has already materialized in the form of new pharmaceutical combinations, more promising hypotheses, improved medical diagnostics, targeted risk factor analysis and reporting that leads to more accuracy in personalized medicine. AI can fully absorb, contextualize and analyze critical healthcare information in the time it takes a human counterpart to read through a few records. The technology is built to mobilize and manage large data sets autonomously. Meanwhile, human counterparts can focus on communicating the benefits of AI findings, proactively using them to address individual medical concerns and offer more personalized patient care.AI can integrate data from multiple sources and determine relevance to specific cases swifter than humans. The technology can analyze data in real-time and produce actionable insights that would take several hours — or years in some cases — for people to complete. When built responsibly using objective data sets and lab-tested technology, AI does not have preconceived notions about the medical records, DNA and RNA analysis and general information it sorts through, eliminating potential biases and erroneous conclusions.AI’s health science success hinges on the availability of human-curated training data sets that allow for performance and bias testing prior to AI entering the market. The opportunity to connect AI and countless data sets presents the greatest opportunity for medical professionals looking toward technology for answers. In practice, AI’s core ability to automate data analysis frees up medical research people to focus on the end result, apply findings to real world medical or pharmaceutical trials, and, ultimately, adapt individual healthcare plans to incorporate new methods.Related: How AI is Making the Impossible Possible in Healthcare SectorLooking ahead to an uncertain future.The biggest challenge for health practitioners turning to AI in 2019 will remain the availability of curated data sets needed to train algorithm-driven technologies destined for disease detection and other crucial medical work. AI must be trustworthy enough to make accurate predictive assessments that dramatically impact patient care and health results in the real world. The process of preparing AI for health will become easier in the near future as the technology advances, regular people become more familiar with AI and its real world applications for disease prevention prove successful.After all, disease prevention is the holy grail. Technologies, like AI, that enable early disease detection and interception will transform patient care wholesale. AI can help medical professionals detect diseases earlier and give people impacted by those diseases a fighting opportunity to overcome them.Undoubtedly, human efforts to rid the world of Alzheimer’s disease, and other deadly illnesses or inherited conditions, will advance with the support of data-driven technologies. Tapping AI for those tasks will allow doctors and medical professionals to focus on providing more precise and empathetic patient care. Researchers can spend time making sense of AI-driven findings in order to bring machine-discovered remedies into a very human reality, like living with Alzheimer’s, that changes lives — and saves them. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. November 7, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals 5 min read Register Now »last_img read more