National Geographic Calls Noah’s Ark Search a Stunt

first_imgNational Geographic News has taken the announcement that McGivern’s team failed to get a permit to search Mt. Ararat (see 04/26/2004 headline) as an opportunity to question all searches and the historicity of Noah’s flood.  They questioned the character and motives of the search team and its guide, and quoted a historian who called the search for Noah’s Ark “fringe archaeology.”  The article recalled previous claims that turned out to be hoaxes, doubted the ability to detect an artificial structure from space, and discounted the story of a world-wide flood in the Bible (unless the Black Sea Flood fit the bill; see 08/22/2003 and 04/21/2001 headlines).  “Most geologists seem to agree that it would probably be impossible for a ship to make landfall at an altitude of 15,000 feet (4,570 meters),” said Stefan Lovgren, author of the article.This illustrates the damage that can be done by pre-announcing a discovery before any facts are gathered.  The satellite photo McGivern had was much too vague.  Whether his guide is a man of integrity or not could have been moot if he indeed was able to lead them to a ship on the mountain.  Lacking proof, one has no science, just hypothesis and suggestive leads.  When the promised evidence doesn’t arrive after the media fanfare, the opponents can have a field day.  This fiasco could hurt future attempts to explore the mountain.    It’s not McGivern’s fault that the Turkish government refused his request for a permit, but every would-be explorer can learn a lesson from this episode.  In a rare show of wisdom, wicked old King Ahab warned his enemy, “Let not the one who puts on his armor boast like the one who takes it off” (I Kings 20:11).  Next time, keep away from the press until you’ve got the goods in hand.  That goes for you, too, National Geographic (see 03/18/2003 headline).    For a wealth of material, photos and news on the search for Noah’s Ark, see NoahsArkSearch.com.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Castro rues poor transition D, not his cold shooting, in loss to Globalport

first_imgLOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Gavina blows his top after yet another Kia loss: ‘I’m tired of this’ UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension And these attempts were point blank floaters and layups that Castro, who finished with 15 points, usually makes.“Everybody has off nights but I think our mistake was our transition defense because once they get the ball we let them start running,” said Castro in Filipino.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThere were also some calls—or lack thereof—that seemed questionable for TNT but Casto would not comment on the officiating in the loss.“We can’t do anything about it, that was what the referees called so we just have to focus on the game next time around,” said Castro. LATEST STORIES View comments The KaTropa failed to stretch their winning streak to three with the loss as they dropped to 4-3. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnessescenter_img PBA IMAGESANTIPOLO—–TNT point guard Jayson Castro had the coldest hands inside Ynares Sports Center in the KaTropa’s loss 119-112 loss to Globalport in the PBA Governors’ Cup.Castro went on a decent 5-of-12 clip from the field but missed multiple crucial shots in the fourth quarter when the KaTropa attempted to come back against the Batang Pier.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:42Police: California school shooting took 16 seconds01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more

Krishnan Madasamy and Subrata Pal: Caught in Indian sport’s vicious circle

first_imgKrishnan MadasamyA fallen athlete is a lonely one. Who remembers Subrata Pal today? Tomorrow, who will remember Krishnan Madasamy? Both lifters, separated by 12 years, were stripped of Commonwealth Games medals and their stories run parallel, a sign how little changes in Indian sport.Kolkata-based Pal, 38 today, who tested positive,Krishnan MadasamyA fallen athlete is a lonely one. Who remembers Subrata Pal today? Tomorrow, who will remember Krishnan Madasamy? Both lifters, separated by 12 years, were stripped of Commonwealth Games medals and their stories run parallel, a sign how little changes in Indian sport.Kolkata-based Pal, 38 today, who tested positive after winning silver in Auckland in 1990, lives quietly, working for Eastern Railways. Madasamy, whose tainted Games silver came in Manchester this year, shares a one-room home with a friend and is a painter at the Integral Coach Factory in Perambur near Chennai.Two evenings after winning his medal in 1990, all Pal was told by officials was that he had to return home from Auckland. He was banned for two years and to this day maintains he was never told what “substance” he was banned for.”If we get into trouble, our coaches just desert us.” Subrata Pal, 1990 Commonwealth Games weightlifterMadasamy, who tested positive for a nandrolone derivative and could face a two-year ban, says he consumed only vitamins and creatine and cleared a dope test in March and was tested again between April and July.When he tested positive in Manchester, he said he volunteered to undergo a blood test. “But Games officials told me it cost too much. Lifting was my passion but I just don’t feel like doing anything anymore.”Pal claims his coach Pal Singh Sandhu kept track of and gave him all the medication he ever took. “He did not trust anyone else with it.” After his test, Pal said he found Sandhu unwilling to help. “If we win a medal, they’re always around to share the limelight,” he says. “But if we get into trouble, they just desert us.”advertisementPal and Madasamy have been caught in Indian sport’s vicious circle – Sandhu is still coach of the national weightlifting team.last_img read more

Philippine Azkals flaunt quality under continental spotlight

first_img(From up L) Philippines’ defender Luke Woodland, Philippines’ defender Alvaro Silva, Philippines’ forward Patrick Reichelt, Philippines’ midfielder Kevin Ingreso, Philippines’ goalkeeper Michael Falkesgaard(From down L) Philippines’ defender Daisuke Sato, Philippines’ midfielder Stephan Schrock, Philippines’ forward Javier Patino, Philippines’ midfielder Manuel Ott, Philippines’ defender Stefan Palla pose for a photograph prior to the 2019 AFC Asian Cup football game between Korea Republic and Philippines at the al-Maktoum stadium in Dubai on January 07, 2019. (Photo by Giuseppe CACACE / AFP)DUBAI—It was a debut many years in the making and the Philippines surely left its mark, notwithstanding the result.On a cold Monday night at Al Maktoum Stadium, the Azkals combined their grit and resilience with their tactical genius and work rate for the rest of the continent to see as they went toe-to-toe against a giant in South Korea in their Group C opener.ADVERTISEMENT That the Koreans needed a 67th minute strike from Hwang Uijo to finally grab maximum points was a mere footnote to what was a memorable introduction for the Azkals, who showed a spring in their step as chants of Pilipinas reverberated inside the cavernous, newly-refurbished facility throughout the match.READ: Asian Cup: Azkals impress in loss to South KoreaFEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“After a game like this, you will be having one teary eye and one which is okay with the result and the performance,” said midfielder Stephan Schrock, the captain for the night as coach Sven Goran Eriksson opted to start Javier Patino in favor of Phil Younghusband.“We are very proud. Korea had a lot of good players, they are composed and much better than the average Asian team. We surprised everyone with the performance tonight. We did very good. We have something to build on.” LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion PBA to implement new rules on goaltending review, traveling, timeouts SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion The Azkals will take a two-hour bus ride to Abu Dhabi late Tuesday as they prepare for their duel with China on Friday. Getting a result against the Chinese is paramount for Eriksson’s side if it wants to advance to the last 16.Few expected the Azkals to stay competitive against a Korean team that regularly plays in the World Cup and only recently stunned former World Cup champion Germany, 2-0.But the Azkals were hardly fazed by the quality and experience of a Korean side, which had established players in Ki Seungyeung of Newcastle United and Lee Chungyoung, formerly of Crystal Palace.The tactical brilliance of the staff led by Eriksson and deputies Scott Cooper and Chris Greatwich allowed the Azkals to cope with the Korean assault for majority of the match.The Azkals defended deep, but they tracked runs off the ball and produced a solid defensive block that hardly allowed the Koreans to break through. On the counter, they proved dangerous with Schrock and Patrick Reichelt threatening on the right and Patino holding up the play to relieve the pressure.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next It took some tweaks and the introduction of Lee early in the second half for Korea to finally break down the Azkals.Lee, who played four seasons in the Premier League, praised the Azkals for their gallant stand.“Everyone thought Korea will win this game, but we saw in the first half that it was not easy,” said the midfielder. “It was a tough game for us. I’m happy to get a result, but the Philippines is good. They have a good future in this tournament.”The three-man defense anchored by Alvaro Silva put bodies on the line just to deny the Koreans opportunities, while Michael Falkesgaard produced three big saves to keep the Azkals in the match up until the late stages of the match.Patino led the line ferociously and provided the Azkals an attacking outlet when they recover the ball from deep positions, but his finishing let him down particularly in the second half when his tamed effort failed to beat Kim Seunggyu on the Korean goal when the match was still goalless.“We kept it nil nil for a long time,” said Younghusband, who came on in the 88th minute.“The longer it got, the more confidence it gave us. Every player had to work in this team. If you lose concentration or you sleep, South Korea will take advantage.”Still, it was a debut to remember for a Philippine team that struggles to get support for the sport back home.“The feeling is incredible: The whole atmosphere,” said Reichelt. “You can feel that this was all a different stage. And we showed that we belong in this stage.”“I’m happy with the performance; but I’m also sad because we could have gotten something out of it,” said Azkals manager Dan Palami. “But if somebody told us before the game that it was going to be just 1-nil, I would take it anytime against a team like South Korea which is always in the World Cup. It gives us encouragement and motivation to do better in our next games.”center_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? LATEST STORIES RELATED VIDEO Magalong: Albayalde also got SUV out of ‘agaw bato’ operation in 2013 PLAY LIST 01:19Magalong: Albayalde also got SUV out of ‘agaw bato’ operation in 201300:50Trending Articles01:21’Save the PNP:’ Gordon says Albayalde ‘under pressure’ from PMA02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausslast_img read more

Photo: Pitt’s “Oakland Zoo” Botched The Tyler Roberson Section Of Its Heckling Cheat Sheet

first_imgOakland Zoo messed up the Tyler Roberson section of its heckling cheap sheet.The Petersen Events Center is one of the hardest places to play in college basketball, and Pitt’s student section, the “Oakland Zoo,” is a big reason why. The Zoo is virtually on top of the court, and like many of the nation’s other top student sections, they get very creative with their heckling. Unfortunately, today doesn’t seem to be their day, at least when it comes to the “cheat sheet” for the game against rival Syracuse.The Oakland Zoo’s cheat sheet on the Syracuse players. Names of players’ girlfriends and moms! pic.twitter.com/VMrsBAxdC5— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015Including mothers and girlfriends is a bit questionable, but the Zoo is far from the only student section to do that. However, the whole basis for taunts against starting forward Tyler Roberson is a mess.robersonzooIn its cheat sheet, the @OaklandZoo mocked Tyler Roberson for spelling his name wrong on Twitter. Problem is: the Zoo spelled it Robertson— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015When making fun of someone for misspelling his own name, you should probably make sure you have it right first.last_img read more

Mobay Vendors Collaborate with Diaspora Communities in UK

first_imgDiaspora communities in England are collaborating with vendors of the Harbour Street Craft & Cultural Village in Montego Bay to showcase the best Jamaican cultural products.The event, dubbed ‘Diaspora Connect Fest’, will be held on Saturday, July 8, in the Village under the theme ‘Bringing Neighbourhoods and Cultural Villages Together’.Among the activities are demonstrations on how to: blow glass, use the potter’s wheel, carve wood and stone, and paint in acrylic and water.Persons will also learn the fine art of drumming and to jerk chicken, pork, fish and vegetables. A number of Jamaica’s traditional herbal remedies will also be displayed at the event.Scheduled to begin at 11:00 a.m., the one-day event will kick-start with a Jamaica 55 Diaspora Domino Challenge, ‘Jamaica versus England’. Later, at about noon, the Mayor of Montego Bay, Councillor Homer Davis, is expected to address the gathering.Global Diaspora Director of Country Style Community Tourism Network, Rudi Page, told JIS News that the event was created to showcase the talents of Jamaicans, and, at the same time, get the diaspora to support the event while they are home for the summer holidays and to attend the Jamaica 55 Diaspora Conference.The Conference is slated for July 23-26 at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston.Mr. Page said it is also important to promote the products in the international market.“We will be taking the best products, made in Jamaica, put them on a technology platform and they will be advertised to the diaspora groups that we are working with, so we have got a commitment, as well, to put the products on the platform,” he said.Mr. Page, who is also Chief Executive Officer of Trade and Services Programme Jamaica (TSPJ), said that small enterprises in Jamaica are in need of international business support, noting that a supply chain collaboration, market access and market intelligence are three difficult areas for small businesses.“So, we are developing those pathways between the diaspora and Jamaica, whether it be from the UK, from the USA or Canada. We are still in early days, so we are weighing the potential opportunities,” he added.The Global Diaspora Director said a bigger event is being planned for next year, under the theme ‘Welcome Home’.“We expect to be working across all the parishes in one way or the other, so this first event is very much to prove the concept,” he said.Diaspora Connect Fest was launched in London by High Commissioner to the UK, His Excellency Seth George Ramocan.last_img read more

Ohio StateMiami 5 questions

1. Who will win the quarterback battle? The two are similar in a few ways. Both are dual-threat quarterbacks. Both passed for more than 3,000 yards last year. Both were handed the keys to their respective offenses as underclassmen. “I think [Pryor and Harris] have traveled a similar road,” OSU coach Jim Tressel said. “They both got put in there at an early point in their freshman year. But in [Pryor’s] case, it was the third or fourth game and he had to kind of get thrown in with an older group and learn their way.” 2. Will either team be able to run the ball effectively? Both defenses will be geared to stuff the run. Miami has a solid cache of defensive linemen, led by a genuine freak-of-nature in 6-foot-3, 287-pound senior Allen Bailey, who is not only a probable first-round pick in next April’s draft, but reportedly killed an alligator with nothing but a shovel a few years ago. As for OSU, the Silver Bullets are usually stout against the run. The OSU defense has ranked in the top five in the nation in fewest rushing yards allowed in three of the last five years. Miami coach Randy Shannon said starting running back Graig Cooper will likely miss the game, although ACC Rookie of the Week Lamar Miller appears to be a capable backup. 3. Can the OSU offensive line protect Pryor? The OSU offensive line did an admirable job last Thursday against Marshall. However, comparing the Marshall defensive line to the Miami front four would be foolish. Tressel isn’t taking the Hurricane pass rushers lightly. “They’re very good. They’re veterans, they’re quick and they’re strong,” Tressel said. “It will be a great challenge for our guys.” Although the Hurricanes have a star in Bailey and a few other solid players, the OSU hog mollies should be equipped to handle the task. 4. Who will win the field position battle? The combination of the crowd, OSU’s ability to force turnovers and Harris’ propensity to throw the football to the other team all favor the Scarlet and Gray. But nearly every one of those characteristics could have been said for the USC game last year and OSU lost that contest, 18-15. On the other hand, if the Buckeyes have the lead heading into the fourth quarter, the game is usually over. Under Tressel, OSU is 86-6 when taking the lead into the final quarter. Disclaimer: OSU led USC, 15-10, heading into the fourth quarter last year. 5. Will an unknown player, coaching decision or (gasp!) referee steal the show? Obviously, all three are impossible to predict. But in the 2003 Fiesta Bowl, the game was defined by curious coaching decisions and questionable calls by officials. From official Terry Porter’s infamous pass interference call in the first overtime, to Tressel’s decision to run a fake field goal early in the game to Miami’s downright dubious goal line offense in the second overtime, the game was full of judgments ripe for barroom discussion. As for an unknown player stealing the show, for Miami, sophomore safety Ray Ray Armstrong and Ohio State sophomore running back Jordan Hall could provide the difference. Armstrong is big (6-foot-4, 220 pounds), fast and saw major playing time as a freshman. If he keeps the OSU passing game in front of him and reads Pryor’s eyes, his performance will be two-fold: tackling receiver Dane Sanzenbacher over the middle of the field and intercepting Pryor. The diminutive Hall could make an impact as a punt returner. Think former LSU star Trindon Holliday, the 5-foot, 6-inch speed sprint champion who also specialized as a returner for the Tigers. Hall is capable of making a similar impact for OSU. This could be his breakout game. read more

Womens Basketball No 8 Ohio State falls 6960 to No 14 Duke

Ohio State redshirt junior guard Sierra Calhoun launches a shot during the first half of the Buckeyes’ game against Quinnipiac on Nov. 15. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports EditorThe No. 8 Ohio State women’s basketball team came back from a 17-point deficit to No. 14 Duke midway through the third quarter to tie the game with 9:15 remaining in the fourth quarter. But the Blue Devils (6-1) responded with a nine-point run to pull away down the stretch en route to a 69-60 victory against the Buckeyes (7-2) Thursday night in Durham, North Carolina, in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge.Guards Lexi Brown and Rebecca Greenwell each scored 19 points for Duke. The Blue Devils won the rebounding battle, holding a 49-30 advantage. This led to a 36-18 edge in points in the paint.The Blue Devils led by 17 points in the third quarter, but did not score for the final six minutes of the third quarter. The Buckeyes slowly pulled even with Duke. But Ohio State struggled to get its offense going in the fourth quarter, missing 11 of its final 12 shots, and turning the ball over five times in the last nine minutes.Duke held Ohio State to its lowest scoring total of the season. The Buckeyes shot just 32 percent from the field and 28 percent from beyond the arc, while the Blue Devils made 46 percent of their shots and 47 percent of their 3-point attempts.Senior guard Kelsey Mitchell led Ohio State with 24 points, but played inefficiently. She made just 9-of-27 shots and hit 4-of-17 3s. Redshirt senior guard Linnae Harper added 12 points and eight rebounds. The Buckeyes forced the Blue Devils into 21 turnovers, including 12 steals, despite their lack of offensive rhythm. Ohio State never led in the entire game. read more

Global warming conference at Rice U accessible on Web

first_imgGLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address No Comments Please feel welcome to post a comment. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentAnti-spam*To prove you are a person (not a spam script), type the words from the following picture or audio file.ListenLoad newCaptcha refreshed.Name *Email *WebsiteSave my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. ShareCONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu GLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” About admin Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” CONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis CONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. GLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Addresslast_img read more

Twitter to Disclose Who Paid for Ads on its Platform

first_img Next Article 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Reporter This story originally appeared on PCMag Michael Kan Twitter to Disclose Who Paid for Ads on its Platform October 25, 2017 Amid criticism that Russia exploited Twitter to influence voter sentiment in last year’s election, the service will now clearly label political ads as such.On a Tuesday blog post, Twitter said it’ll create an “advertising transparency center,” where the public can view all the ads that are running on the platform, and who paid for them. In the future, Twitter will also clearly identify tweets from a political account.Twitter’s transparency center will have a special section devoted to these political ads. It’ll show who bought them, how much they’ve spent on total campaign ads and which demographics these ads have been targeting, including the age, gender and geography.Twitter unveiled the plan days after U.S. senators introduced legislation that would require major online services to adopt similar measures. That includes forcing services like Twitter to create a public file on political ad purchases, and placing disclaimers on each ad, identifying who sponsored them.The legislation is in response to Russia’s suspected role in using social media to interfere with last year’s presidential election. Some of those efforts included buying political ads on Facebook, Google and Twitter, but outdated campaign laws prevent the public from knowing who bought them, according to the U.S. senators behind the bill.On Tuesday, Twitter said it’s also going beyond electoral advertisements, and will develop stricter policies around “issue-based ads.” However, this will take time, and it’ll involve collaborating with other tech companies, industry leaders and ad partners to clearly define what these policies should encompass.Whether any of these measures will placate U.S. lawmakers remains unclear. But on Tuesday, Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who was critical of Twitter’s initial transparency efforts on this issue, praised the company’s announcement.A good first step, particularly public disclosure of ads info. Online political ads need more transparency & disclosure. We need #HonestAds https://t.co/ewDbd1hTxZ— Mark Warner (@MarkWarner) October 24, 2017Twitter’s blog post didn’t say whether the company supports the upcoming legislation.In the meantime, the company has vowed to crack down on another problem facing the platform: the influence of fake Twitter accounts spreading misinformation, another way lawmakers say Russia interfered with last year’s presidential election.Last month, Twitter itself disclosed that it had found 200 accounts connected to Russian-linked efforts to influence the public over social media. Reportedly, Russian trolls also created a fake Tennessee Republican Party Twitter account that managed to get retweets from President Donald Trump’s staff last year.In response, Twitter has said it’s investing in new techiniques to fight bots and spam on the platform. Twitter unveiled the new effort after U.S. senators introduced legislation that would require tech companies to add disclaimers to political ads. –shares Guest Writer 3 min read Add to Queue Twitter Image credit: Via PC Mag The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now »last_img read more