Photo: Pitt’s “Oakland Zoo” Botched The Tyler Roberson Section Of Its Heckling Cheat Sheet

first_imgOakland Zoo messed up the Tyler Roberson section of its heckling cheap sheet.The Petersen Events Center is one of the hardest places to play in college basketball, and Pitt’s student section, the “Oakland Zoo,” is a big reason why. The Zoo is virtually on top of the court, and like many of the nation’s other top student sections, they get very creative with their heckling. Unfortunately, today doesn’t seem to be their day, at least when it comes to the “cheat sheet” for the game against rival Syracuse.The Oakland Zoo’s cheat sheet on the Syracuse players. Names of players’ girlfriends and moms! pic.twitter.com/VMrsBAxdC5— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015Including mothers and girlfriends is a bit questionable, but the Zoo is far from the only student section to do that. However, the whole basis for taunts against starting forward Tyler Roberson is a mess.robersonzooIn its cheat sheet, the @OaklandZoo mocked Tyler Roberson for spelling his name wrong on Twitter. Problem is: the Zoo spelled it Robertson— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015When making fun of someone for misspelling his own name, you should probably make sure you have it right first.last_img read more

Mobay Vendors Collaborate with Diaspora Communities in UK

first_imgDiaspora communities in England are collaborating with vendors of the Harbour Street Craft & Cultural Village in Montego Bay to showcase the best Jamaican cultural products.The event, dubbed ‘Diaspora Connect Fest’, will be held on Saturday, July 8, in the Village under the theme ‘Bringing Neighbourhoods and Cultural Villages Together’.Among the activities are demonstrations on how to: blow glass, use the potter’s wheel, carve wood and stone, and paint in acrylic and water.Persons will also learn the fine art of drumming and to jerk chicken, pork, fish and vegetables. A number of Jamaica’s traditional herbal remedies will also be displayed at the event.Scheduled to begin at 11:00 a.m., the one-day event will kick-start with a Jamaica 55 Diaspora Domino Challenge, ‘Jamaica versus England’. Later, at about noon, the Mayor of Montego Bay, Councillor Homer Davis, is expected to address the gathering.Global Diaspora Director of Country Style Community Tourism Network, Rudi Page, told JIS News that the event was created to showcase the talents of Jamaicans, and, at the same time, get the diaspora to support the event while they are home for the summer holidays and to attend the Jamaica 55 Diaspora Conference.The Conference is slated for July 23-26 at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston.Mr. Page said it is also important to promote the products in the international market.“We will be taking the best products, made in Jamaica, put them on a technology platform and they will be advertised to the diaspora groups that we are working with, so we have got a commitment, as well, to put the products on the platform,” he said.Mr. Page, who is also Chief Executive Officer of Trade and Services Programme Jamaica (TSPJ), said that small enterprises in Jamaica are in need of international business support, noting that a supply chain collaboration, market access and market intelligence are three difficult areas for small businesses.“So, we are developing those pathways between the diaspora and Jamaica, whether it be from the UK, from the USA or Canada. We are still in early days, so we are weighing the potential opportunities,” he added.The Global Diaspora Director said a bigger event is being planned for next year, under the theme ‘Welcome Home’.“We expect to be working across all the parishes in one way or the other, so this first event is very much to prove the concept,” he said.Diaspora Connect Fest was launched in London by High Commissioner to the UK, His Excellency Seth George Ramocan.last_img read more

Ohio StateMiami 5 questions

1. Who will win the quarterback battle? The two are similar in a few ways. Both are dual-threat quarterbacks. Both passed for more than 3,000 yards last year. Both were handed the keys to their respective offenses as underclassmen. “I think [Pryor and Harris] have traveled a similar road,” OSU coach Jim Tressel said. “They both got put in there at an early point in their freshman year. But in [Pryor’s] case, it was the third or fourth game and he had to kind of get thrown in with an older group and learn their way.” 2. Will either team be able to run the ball effectively? Both defenses will be geared to stuff the run. Miami has a solid cache of defensive linemen, led by a genuine freak-of-nature in 6-foot-3, 287-pound senior Allen Bailey, who is not only a probable first-round pick in next April’s draft, but reportedly killed an alligator with nothing but a shovel a few years ago. As for OSU, the Silver Bullets are usually stout against the run. The OSU defense has ranked in the top five in the nation in fewest rushing yards allowed in three of the last five years. Miami coach Randy Shannon said starting running back Graig Cooper will likely miss the game, although ACC Rookie of the Week Lamar Miller appears to be a capable backup. 3. Can the OSU offensive line protect Pryor? The OSU offensive line did an admirable job last Thursday against Marshall. However, comparing the Marshall defensive line to the Miami front four would be foolish. Tressel isn’t taking the Hurricane pass rushers lightly. “They’re very good. They’re veterans, they’re quick and they’re strong,” Tressel said. “It will be a great challenge for our guys.” Although the Hurricanes have a star in Bailey and a few other solid players, the OSU hog mollies should be equipped to handle the task. 4. Who will win the field position battle? The combination of the crowd, OSU’s ability to force turnovers and Harris’ propensity to throw the football to the other team all favor the Scarlet and Gray. But nearly every one of those characteristics could have been said for the USC game last year and OSU lost that contest, 18-15. On the other hand, if the Buckeyes have the lead heading into the fourth quarter, the game is usually over. Under Tressel, OSU is 86-6 when taking the lead into the final quarter. Disclaimer: OSU led USC, 15-10, heading into the fourth quarter last year. 5. Will an unknown player, coaching decision or (gasp!) referee steal the show? Obviously, all three are impossible to predict. But in the 2003 Fiesta Bowl, the game was defined by curious coaching decisions and questionable calls by officials. From official Terry Porter’s infamous pass interference call in the first overtime, to Tressel’s decision to run a fake field goal early in the game to Miami’s downright dubious goal line offense in the second overtime, the game was full of judgments ripe for barroom discussion. As for an unknown player stealing the show, for Miami, sophomore safety Ray Ray Armstrong and Ohio State sophomore running back Jordan Hall could provide the difference. Armstrong is big (6-foot-4, 220 pounds), fast and saw major playing time as a freshman. If he keeps the OSU passing game in front of him and reads Pryor’s eyes, his performance will be two-fold: tackling receiver Dane Sanzenbacher over the middle of the field and intercepting Pryor. The diminutive Hall could make an impact as a punt returner. Think former LSU star Trindon Holliday, the 5-foot, 6-inch speed sprint champion who also specialized as a returner for the Tigers. Hall is capable of making a similar impact for OSU. This could be his breakout game. read more

Womens Basketball No 8 Ohio State falls 6960 to No 14 Duke

Ohio State redshirt junior guard Sierra Calhoun launches a shot during the first half of the Buckeyes’ game against Quinnipiac on Nov. 15. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports EditorThe No. 8 Ohio State women’s basketball team came back from a 17-point deficit to No. 14 Duke midway through the third quarter to tie the game with 9:15 remaining in the fourth quarter. But the Blue Devils (6-1) responded with a nine-point run to pull away down the stretch en route to a 69-60 victory against the Buckeyes (7-2) Thursday night in Durham, North Carolina, in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge.Guards Lexi Brown and Rebecca Greenwell each scored 19 points for Duke. The Blue Devils won the rebounding battle, holding a 49-30 advantage. This led to a 36-18 edge in points in the paint.The Blue Devils led by 17 points in the third quarter, but did not score for the final six minutes of the third quarter. The Buckeyes slowly pulled even with Duke. But Ohio State struggled to get its offense going in the fourth quarter, missing 11 of its final 12 shots, and turning the ball over five times in the last nine minutes.Duke held Ohio State to its lowest scoring total of the season. The Buckeyes shot just 32 percent from the field and 28 percent from beyond the arc, while the Blue Devils made 46 percent of their shots and 47 percent of their 3-point attempts.Senior guard Kelsey Mitchell led Ohio State with 24 points, but played inefficiently. She made just 9-of-27 shots and hit 4-of-17 3s. Redshirt senior guard Linnae Harper added 12 points and eight rebounds. The Buckeyes forced the Blue Devils into 21 turnovers, including 12 steals, despite their lack of offensive rhythm. Ohio State never led in the entire game. read more

Global warming conference at Rice U accessible on Web

first_imgGLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address No Comments Please feel welcome to post a comment. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentAnti-spam*To prove you are a person (not a spam script), type the words from the following picture or audio file.ListenLoad newCaptcha refreshed.Name *Email *WebsiteSave my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. ShareCONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu GLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” About admin Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” CONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis CONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE:(713) 348-6770EMAIL: balmond@rice.edu Dr. Neal Lane Assistantto the United States President for Science and TechnologyDirector, Office of Science and Technology Policy Thursday, Sept. 78-9:50 a.m. Panel III: The Influence ofSolar Output on the Earth’s ClimateModerator: Dr.Dale Sawyer, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. TheodorLandscheidt, Schroeter Institute for Research in Cycles of Solar ActivityDr. Judith Lean, NavalObservatory Washington Dr. David Rind, NASA GoddardInstitute for Space Studies Dr. Sallie Baliunas and Dr. Willie Soon,Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 10:10 a.m.-noon Panel IV: The Geological Recordon Climate ChangeModerator: Dr. John B. Anderson,Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr. Richard Alley, PennStateDr. Thomas Crowley, Texas A&M UniversityDr. Andre Droxler, Rice UniversityDr. James Kennett,University of California-Santa Barbara1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Sovereignty: A New International Paradigm?” Ambassador Richard R. Burt Former Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany and Assistant Secretary of State for Europe 2-3:30 p.m. Panel V: CO2 and theBiosphere Moderator: Dr. Ronald Sass, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Bert Drake, SmithsonianEnvironmental Research CenterDr. Craig Idso, Center for the Study of CarbonDioxide/Global Change Dr. Richard Norby, Oakridge National Laboratory,Environmental Science Division 3:45-5:15 p.m. Panel VI: Alternative EnergyTechnologiesModerator: Dr. Michelle M. Foss,University of Houston Panelists: Dr. Dagobert Brito,Rice University and Dr. Juan Rosellon, CIDEDr. HenryKelly, Federation of American ScientistsDr. LawrenceRuth, Office of Coal/Environmental Systems, U.S.Department of Energy Introduction of Evening KeynoteAddressJames A. Baker, IIIHonorary Chair of The Baker Institute for Public Policy at RiceUniversity, Houston5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Address: “Moving Beyond Kyoto: A Responsible Approach to the Climate ChangeIssue”Senator Charles Hagel, U.S. Senate(Nebraska)Friday, Sept. 88:30-10 a.m. Panel VII: The Kyoto Accords: TheEconomics of CO2 Abatement I–Modeling ApproachesModerator: Dr. Robin Sickles, Rice UniversityPanelists: Dr.Stephen Brown, Australian Bureau of Agricultural/Resource Economics Mr.Robert Eynon, Energy Information Agency Dr. John Weyant, StanfordUniversityDr. Joseph Romm, Center for Energy and Climate Solutions10:15 a.m.-noon Panel VIII: The Kyoto Accords:The Economics of CO2 Abatement II–Methods of Control andUncertaintyModerator: Dr. Peter Mieszkowski, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Charles Kolstad, Universityof California-Santa BarbaraDr. Sophie Meritet,French Consulate, French Trade OfficeDr. ThomasMoore, Hoover InstituteDr. Michael Toman, Resourcesfor the Future1:15-1:45 p.m. Keynote Address: “Science and Crystal Balls” Dr. Robert F.Curl Jr.Professor, Rice University /1996 NobelLaureate, Chemistry2-3:30 p.m. Panel IX: Economic Growth and GlobalWarming PolicyModerator: Dr. Donald Ostkiek, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Juliann Allison, Universityof California-RiversideDr. Kenneth Green, ReasonPublic Policy InstituteDr. Peter Hartley and Dr.Kenneth Medlock, Rice UniversityDr. Jeremy Rabkin,Cornell University3:30-4 p.m. Concluding Remarks Ambassador Edward P. Djerejian Director ofthe Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, HoustonBackground information on keynotespeakers:Dr. Neal F. Lane, the assistant to theU.S. President for Science and Technology, in August 1998 began directing theOffice of Science and Technology Policy, where he participates in formulatinggovernment regulatory policy. Lane taught physics and astronomy for more than 27years at Rice University, where he also served as provost from 1986 to 1993.Both a popular university teacher and research physicist, Lane has shared histheoretical expertise with various federal and state agencies to help guide andconstruct national public policy. Prior to his current appointment, Lanedirected the National Science Foundation and served on the National ScienceBoard for six years. He has published articles detailing his research in atomicand molecular physics and currently serves simultaneously as a fellow with theAmerican Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and theAmerican Advancement of Science. Ambassador Richard R. Burt served as the U.S.chief negotiator in the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) with the formerSoviet Union and was the assistant secretary of state for European and CanadianAffairs. From 1985 to 1989 Burt served as ambassador to the Federal Republic ofGermany and has directed the Office of Politico-Military Affairs for the StateDepartment. For the past 10 years Burt has been involved in several diverse,international business corporations from information technology and European andNorth American newspapers to steel manufacturing. Burt is president of theLauder Institute of the Wharton School of Business at the University ofPennsylvania and currently serves as a senior adviser to the Center forStrategic and International Studies. He most recently joined the Secretary ofDefense’s Defense Policy Board. Senator Charles (“Chuck”) Hagel has served in theU.S. Senate from Nebraska since 1996 and has been active on the Senatecommittees for Foreign Relations and Banking, as well as the committees forHousing and Urban Affairs, Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, and theSpecial Committee on Aging. Hagel serves as the chair for both the Senate GlobalClimate Change Observer Group and the Senate Government Oversight Task Force.National groups such as the Center for the Study of the Presidency, Watchdogs ofthe Treasury, the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Federation ofIndependent Businesses have recognized Hagel’s voting record by awarding him,respectively, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Golden Bulldog Award, Friendof the Farm Bureau, and the Guardian Award. Dr. Robert F. Curl Jr., a leading expert inhigh-resolution spectroscopy and one of the codiscoverers of the carbon cagecompounds called the fullerenes, has taught physical chemistry at Rice since1958, where he now has been appointed the Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess professorof natural sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, PhiBeta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the AmericanAcademy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, aprevious NSF predoctoral fellow, a NATO postdoctoral fellow and an Alexander vonHumboldt Senior Awardee. Jointly with Professor Pitzer at University ofCalifornia-Berkeley, he received the Clayton Prize of the Institute ofMechanical Engineers in 1957 for work on the internal rotation of singlechemical bonds. Jointly with Drs. Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto, he receivedthe Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996, the American Physical SocietyInternational Prize for New Materials in 1992 and the American Carbon SocietyMedal for Achievement in Carbon Science in 1997. GLOBAL WARMINGCONFERENCE AT RICE U. ACCESSIBLE ON WEB “Global Warming: Scienceand Policy,” a three-day conference at Rice University’s Baker Institute forPublic Policy, will be simulcast on the Web Sept. 6-8. Journalists can listen tothe keynote speakers and panel discussions online at www.rice.edu/rtv.To tune in to the Webcast, you will need “RealAudio Player,” a free, downloadable software. The Rice site contains a linkto the Web page from which the free RealAudio Player can be downloaded. With theRealAudio Player installed on your computer, just click on the links located at www.rice.edu/rtv, and the file will begin “streaming” or sending the speech to your computer. The conference agenda and background informationon the keynote speakers appear below.Wednesday, Sept. 612:45 p.m. Opening Remarks Dr. Malcolm Gillis President, RiceUniversity, Houston1-2:50 p.m. Panel I: Computer Simulations of theEarth’s ClimateModerator: Dr. Arthur Few, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. Eric Barron, PennStateDr. Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute ofTechnologyDr. James Hansen, NASA Goddard Institutefor Space StudiesDr. Patrick Michaels, University ofWisconsin-Madison3:10-5 p.m. Panel II: The Recent TemperatureRecordModerator: Dr. Randy Hulet, RiceUniversityPanelists: Dr. John Christy, University ofAlabama in Huntsville Dr. Thomas Peterson, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. Sydney Levitus, National Climatic DataCenter/NOAADr. John Wallace, University ofWashington5:30-6:30 p.m. Keynote Addresslast_img read more

Twitter to Disclose Who Paid for Ads on its Platform

first_img Next Article 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Reporter This story originally appeared on PCMag Michael Kan Twitter to Disclose Who Paid for Ads on its Platform October 25, 2017 Amid criticism that Russia exploited Twitter to influence voter sentiment in last year’s election, the service will now clearly label political ads as such.On a Tuesday blog post, Twitter said it’ll create an “advertising transparency center,” where the public can view all the ads that are running on the platform, and who paid for them. In the future, Twitter will also clearly identify tweets from a political account.Twitter’s transparency center will have a special section devoted to these political ads. It’ll show who bought them, how much they’ve spent on total campaign ads and which demographics these ads have been targeting, including the age, gender and geography.Twitter unveiled the plan days after U.S. senators introduced legislation that would require major online services to adopt similar measures. That includes forcing services like Twitter to create a public file on political ad purchases, and placing disclaimers on each ad, identifying who sponsored them.The legislation is in response to Russia’s suspected role in using social media to interfere with last year’s presidential election. Some of those efforts included buying political ads on Facebook, Google and Twitter, but outdated campaign laws prevent the public from knowing who bought them, according to the U.S. senators behind the bill.On Tuesday, Twitter said it’s also going beyond electoral advertisements, and will develop stricter policies around “issue-based ads.” However, this will take time, and it’ll involve collaborating with other tech companies, industry leaders and ad partners to clearly define what these policies should encompass.Whether any of these measures will placate U.S. lawmakers remains unclear. But on Tuesday, Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who was critical of Twitter’s initial transparency efforts on this issue, praised the company’s announcement.A good first step, particularly public disclosure of ads info. Online political ads need more transparency & disclosure. We need #HonestAds https://t.co/ewDbd1hTxZ— Mark Warner (@MarkWarner) October 24, 2017Twitter’s blog post didn’t say whether the company supports the upcoming legislation.In the meantime, the company has vowed to crack down on another problem facing the platform: the influence of fake Twitter accounts spreading misinformation, another way lawmakers say Russia interfered with last year’s presidential election.Last month, Twitter itself disclosed that it had found 200 accounts connected to Russian-linked efforts to influence the public over social media. Reportedly, Russian trolls also created a fake Tennessee Republican Party Twitter account that managed to get retweets from President Donald Trump’s staff last year.In response, Twitter has said it’s investing in new techiniques to fight bots and spam on the platform. Twitter unveiled the new effort after U.S. senators introduced legislation that would require tech companies to add disclaimers to political ads. –shares Guest Writer 3 min read Add to Queue Twitter Image credit: Via PC Mag The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now »last_img read more

Jeff Bezos Did What The Week In Entrepreneur News Quiz

first_img Register Now » Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Quizzes Add to Queue –shares Entrepreneur Staff How plugged in are you? Find out! September 14, 2018 Entrepreneur Staff Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 1 min read This week, Tesla got a jump start (of sorts) and a little girl’s crunchy dream came true. Were you paying attention to the goings on in the entrepreneurial universe? See how plugged in you were to this week’s news hits.Related: Are You a Genius? Take This Quiz and Find Out!Close Image credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images Next Article Jeff Bezos Did What?! The Week In Entrepreneur News Quizlast_img read more

Speech Input GPS Make Mobile Search Smarter

first_img Speech-based search apps and services such as ChaCha, Microsoft’s Tellme, and Yahoo’s OneSearch cater to the needs of people on the go. Speech Input, GPS Make Mobile Search Smarter Technology Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business When you’re sitting at a computer, a good search engine puts the entire Internet at your fingertips–but that probably isn’t what you want when you are searching from a cell phone. Skimming pages of Google results on a tiny screen with sluggish connectivity can be frustrating, and typing keywords on a small (or software) keyboard is not fun.New mobile search services and apps let you speak (rather than type) search terms and filter results based on proximity (on the assumption that you’re likely searching for something nearby). Microsoft’s Tellme, Yahoo’s OneSearch, and offerings by smaller companies such as ChaCha may not be perfect, but they do try to tailor their searches to meet the needs of mobile users.Applications that accept speech input and return Web results are the latest development. New versions of Tellme and OneSearch (available at launch as downloadable apps for recent GPS-enabled BlackBerry devices) let you search by holding down the green Talk button and speaking keywords into the handset. Speech-to-text technology then turns the digitized audio into text fed to searches that use the handset’s location information.Results on OneSearch look and act more or less like traditional links, organized by category. When I spoke the words “dim sum,” the first results OneSearch returned (under the heading ‘Businesses’) were Chinese restaurants and a link to retrieve more of the same. The restaurant listings included links to maps, reviews, and a call dialer; conventional search results, including an entry from Wikipedia, came next.The new version of Tellme hadn’t appeared at this writing (it should be available by the time you read this), but in a demo it, too, presented a list of businesses. Clicking any entry produced a screen bearing the company’s address and phone number at the top, with icons for relevant info or tasks such as initiating a phone call, displaying a map, or even making a purchase. If you don’t want (or have)the GPS data to guide the search, you can tell your preferred location to Tellme. It does not provide general search results, however.An earlier version of Tellme, which accepts voice input for directory assistance, is available on Sprint and Helio GPS phones. Or you can try out the lookup service by calling 1-800-555-8355, or text search keywords to 83556. Starting today (April 23, 2008), BlackBerry users will be able to get the Tellme app over the air by pointing their browser at m.tellme.com; alternatively, they can download the app at http://www.tellme.com/you .Google doesn’t offer users a voice search app, but you can submit a voice query to 1-800-466-4411, and be connected to a relevant business. Google also supports a range of SMS searches.ChaCha, another search service, invites you to dial 1-800-224-2242 (for voice queries) or text your question to 242 242. In an interesting twist, ChaCha uses real people (called guides) to answer some queries. It took ChaCha only a few seconds to tell me the dates of the Democratic National Convention (August 25-28). But a query about new episodes of HBO’s John Adams elicited information about the network’s series House, which was irrelevant to my search request except perhaps in the marketing sense of “other fine products you might be interested in.” Maybe no guide was on duty…Meanwhile, V-Enable has announced a voice-enabled app for its Free Mobile 411 Web-based lookup service for Sprint users; others can type in keywords and, if they come up empty, opt to connect to a live operator–but in that case, Directory Assistance charges will apply.Go2 accepts text input only, but its menu-based structure acts as a filter that permits you to focus on restaurants, movies, news, and the like–or conduct a general search.Mobile search services expect to make money through ads, sponsored results (Go2’s restaurant search results, for example, included a link to Zagat’s site) and transactional fees (for example, a cut of a movie ticket purchase). Users need only consent to the use of their location information. Since so many of these services are new, it’s unclear what impact advertising will have, and I wouldn’t want to use them without an all-you-can-eat data plan. But for targeted information on the go, they should prove to be very helpful; for once, Google has some catching up to do. –shares Add to Queue April 27, 2008 4 min read Brought to you by PCWorld Register Now » Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel.last_img read more

Could US Tech Companies Face Overseas Warrants

first_img –shares Image credit: Peopleimages | Getty Images The Obama administration is said to be in negotiations with international governments that could eventually allow them to serve U.S. technology companies with warrants on things like email and wiretaps, the Wall Street Journal reports.The first agreement will likely be signed with the U.K., according to the report. The negotiations were discussed by a senior Justice Department official on Friday. Any deals would not provide access to data from U.S. citizens or residents. They would also have to be approved by Congress and international lawmakers.Complicating matters is a recent federal appeals court ruling that said U.S.-based federal warrants cannot be used on search data stored in overseas data centers. The case, brought by Microsoft, was viewed as a major blow to law enforcement and a win for privacy advocates.Law enforcement argues it should have access to data in the event it can stop or solve a crime. Particularly in the wake of the Snowden leaks, however, technology companies do not want customers to think they are participating in government surveillance.The move to allow foreign governments to access U.S. Internet company data could make that divide even greater. Privacy advocates aware of the negotiations are already decrying the proposals, saying that it would put individual liberty at risk.Looking ahead, any U.K. deal would serve as a template, the Journal says. But Congress has dragged its feet on updates to legislation like the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), which dates back to 1986. July 19, 2016 Add to Queue Next Article 2 min read International Business Don Reisinger 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Apply Now » This story originally appeared on PCMag Could U.S. Tech Companies Face Overseas Warrants? Contributing Writer The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue.last_img read more

AI approach could identify nuanced imaging features specific for recalledbenign mammograms

first_img Source:http://www.aacr.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 11 2018Bottom Line: An artificial intelligence (AI) approach based on deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) could identify nuanced mammographic imaging features specific for recalled but benign (false-positive) mammograms and distinguish such mammograms from those identified as malignant or negative.Journal in Which the Study was Published: Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.Author: Shandong Wu, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, biomedical informatics, bioengineering, intelligent systems, and clinical and translational science, and director of the Intelligent Computing for Clinical Imaging lab in the Department of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaBackground: “In order to catch breast cancer early and help reduce mortality, mammography is an important screening exam; however, it currently suffers from a high false recall rate,” said Wu. “These false recalls result in undue psychological stress for patients and a substantial increase in clinical workload and medical costs. Therefore, research on possible means to reduce false recalls in screening mammography is an important topic to investigate.”How the Study Was Conducted: Wu and colleagues studied whether a technique in artificial intelligence called deep learning could be applied to analyze a large set of mammograms in order to distinguish images from women with a malignant diagnosis, images from women who were recalled and were later determined to have benign lesions (false recalls), and images from women determined to be breast cancer-free at the time of screening.”The assumption is that there may be some nuanced imaging features associated with some mammogram images that could lead to a false/unnecessary recall when the images are interpreted by human radiologists, and our goal is to utilize a deep learning CNN-based method to build a computer toolkit to identify those potential mammogram images,” Wu said.Related StoriesScientists discover rare autoimmune disease triggered by testicular cancerIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyNew research uncovers mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugsThe researchers used a total of 14,860 images of 3,715 patients from two independent mammography datasets, Full-Field Digital Mammography Dataset (FFDM – 1,303 patients) and Digital Dataset of Screening Mammography (DDSM – 2,412 patients). They built CNN models and utilized enhanced model training approaches to investigate six classification scenarios that would help distinguish images of benign, malignant, and recalled-benign mammograms.Results: When the datasets from FFDM and DDSM were combined, the area under the curve (AUC) to distinguish benign, malignant, and recalled-benign images ranged from 0.76 to 0.91. The higher the AUC, the better the performance, with a maximum of 1, Wu explained. “AUC is a metric that summarizes the comparison of true positives against false positives, so it gives an indication not only of accuracy (how many were correctly identified), but also how many were falsely identified,” he said.Author’s Comments: Wu said, “We showed that there are imaging features unique to recalled-benign images that deep learning can identify and potentially help radiologists in making better decisions on whether a patient should be recalled or is more likely a false recall.””Based on the consistent ability of our algorithm to discriminate all categories of mammography images, our findings indicate that there are indeed some distinguishing features/characteristics unique to images that are unnecessarily recalled,” Wu noted. “Our AI models can augment radiologists in reading these images and ultimately benefit patients by helping reduce unnecessary recalls.”Study Limitations: As limitations of the study, Wu noted that additional independent datasets could help further evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the algorithms, and utilizing alternative deep learning models, architectures, and model training strategies can help improve performance.last_img read more

New findings bring about better understanding of many cancers metabolic needs

first_img Source:https://stemcell.ucla.edu/news/ucla-study-overturns-dogma-cancer-metabolism-theory-%E2%80%93-tumors-not-addicted-glucose-previously Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 10 2019Scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism.The findings could bring about a better understanding of many cancers’ metabolic needs and lead to the development of more effective therapies for squamous cell skin cancer and other forms of epithelial cancer.The research, led by senior authors Heather Christofk and Bill Lowry, was published in the journal Nature Communications.A fundamental doctrine of cancer metabolism theory is that cancer cells are glycolytic, meaning they consume more glucose and produce more lactate than normal cells. This metabolic shift, called aerobic glycolysis, or the Warburg effect, has been observed in thousands of experiments and inspired treatments that aim to stop tumor growth by preventing cancer cells from increasing their glucose consumption. To date, this treatment approach has not proven successful in clinical trials.Considering these clinical limitations, Christofk and Lowry set out to examine if increased glucose consumption is truly indispensable to cancer formation and growth.They decided to approach this problem using squamous cell skin cancer as a model, as they had made two key discoveries about the nature of this cancer in recent years.In 2011, they determined that squamous cell skin cancer, which forms in the thin, flat cells found on the surface of the skin – can originate from hair follicle stem cells. Hair follicle stem cells produce hair throughout a person’s lifetime and remain mostly inactive, but spring to action during a new hair cycle, which is when new hair growth occurs. In 2017, the pair found that hair follicle stem cells are glycolytic and ramp up their glucose consumption to quickly activate and produce hair follicles.”These findings led us to question: Are squamous cell skin cancer cells glycolytic because they are cancer cells that altered their metabolism to fuel their rapid growth, or because the cells they originated from – hair follicle stem cells – were glycolytic?” said Lowry, a professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology.To answer this question, the team studied the progression of squamous cell skin cancer in animal models whose hair follicle stem cells had been genetically modified to limit their glucose consumption. Specifically, they de-activated a gene called lactate dehydrogenase-a, which catalyzes the final step in a cell’s process of converting glucose to lactate. Deactivating this gene prevented this final step from taking place, which in turn caused the cells to dramatically reduce their glucose consumption.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerThe change had no effect on cancer incidence or progression. When faced with insufficient glucose for their increased needs, the cancer cells in this model simply altered their metabolism to derive energy from the amino acid glutamine.”These findings suggest that tumors are metabolically flexible and can use nutrients other than glucose to fuel growth,” said Christofk, an associate professor of biological chemistry and molecular and medical pharmacology. “Understanding all of the nutrients cancers use for growth is critical to developing drugs that can successfully target cancer’s metabolism.”The team double-checked their findings by conducting a converse experiment using hair follicle stem cells that had been genetically modified to increase glucose consumption. If their initial finding was incorrect, stimulating glucose consumption would make the tumors grow faster – it did not.”The cells still formed cancer, but they didn’t do so any faster and it wasn’t any more serious,” said Aimee Flores, a postdoctoral fellow in Lowry’s lab and a first author of the study. “The behavior and progression of the disease was quite similar to the disease observed in the model with reduced glucose consumption.”As a next step, the team will conduct experiments to determine if reducing the consumption of both glucose and glutamine can stop the growth of squamous cell skin cancers.”If limiting cancer’s intake of both of these nutrients is shown to be effective, then that points to a path toward the clinic in the form of a combination therapy,” said Lowry.There is already some evidence that a combination therapy of this kind could treat squamous cell lung cancer. David Shackelford, an associate professor in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine and a colleague of Christofk and Lowry’s at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, found that squamous cell lung cancers metabolize glutamine when unable to increase their glucose consumption.Shackelford and his collaborators – including Christofk –  also identified two drug candidatesthat, when used in combination, may stop the growth of squamous cell lung cancers by reducing the uptake of both of these nutrients.Despite these encouraging findings, the road to bringing combination therapies for squamous cell cancers to humans is a long one, cautioned Lowry. “Every drug you add to a potential treatment carries its own risks and side effects, so identifying and testing combination therapies that will be both safe and effective in humans is a long and arduous process,” he said.last_img read more

Western diet may increase the risk of deadly sepsis warn experts

first_imgNapier also predicts that if it is the fats in the diet that are reprogramming the immune system, then these findings might not only apply to the Western diet but other high-fat diets as well.Napier and her team will now investigate whether specific fats in the diet are able to influence the risk of higher sepsis severity. If you could introduce a dietary intervention while they’re in the ICU to decrease their chances of manipulating their immune system in that way, you can somehow influence the outcome.”Brooke Napier, Study Author Napier and her team also identified molecular markers in mice fed the Western diet that could be used as biomarkers for patients who are at high risk of developing severe sepsis.She stated that treatments could be predicted and specifically tailored depending on whether a patient has these certain “cell populations” in their blood. Source:Western diet regulates immune status and the response to LPS-driven sepsis independent of diet-associated microbiome.center_img The mice’s immune system on the Western diet looked and functioned differently […] It looks like the diet is manipulating immune cell function so that you’re more susceptible to sepsis, and then when you get sepsis, you die quicker.”Brooke Napier, Study Author By Lois Zoppi, BAFeb 13 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)New research conducted at Portland State University suggests that the Western diet may increase the risk of severe sepsis and mortality from the infection.hurricanehank | ShutterstockThe Western diet, which is the most prevalent diet in westernized countries, is characterized by the consumption of foods that are low in fiber and high in fat and sugar. It is well documented that this diet pattern can cause significant damage to cardiovascular health, the kidneys, and cause obesity.However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the Western diet can also have detrimental effects on the immune system, which includes increasing the risks of severe sepsis, the 11th most common cause of death worldwide.Sepsis is commonly known as blood poisoning, The illness can occur when the body reacts to an infection too aggressively, attacking its own tissues and organs.The body goes into overdrive and can lead to reactions causing inflammation, clotting, and organ failure. It isn’t fully understood what regulates this serious immunological response, or what influences the outcome and severity of sepsis.In a recent study, Brooke Napier (Portland State University), found that mice who were fed a ‘Western diet’ were more likely to contract sepsis and suffered poorer outcomes, compared to mice that were fed a balanced diet that was rich in fiber.The mice that were fed this high-sugar, high-fat diet presented higher chronic inflammation, increased sepsis-associated immunoparalysis, and altered neutrophil populations in the blood. They also showed an increase in sepsis severity and higher mortality rates than mice fed a standard fiber-rich diet.The increase in sepsis severity and mortality was independent of the diet-associated microbiome, hinting that diet might be “directly regulating the innate immune system”. However, the exact mechanism through which this occurs remains unknown.last_img read more

SAP unveils big push into French tech startups

Europe’s biggest software company SAP on Monday said it will spend up to two billion euros investing in and nurturing French start-ups as part of its push into cutting-edge technologies like artificial intelligence. The move by the German firm comes as France is increasingly emerging as a leading hub for tech innovation, boosted by President Emmanuel Macron’s efforts to promote the nation as open for business.”There is a real sense of economic momentum in France,” said SAP chief executive Bill McDermott after Macron hosted talks with some 140 business leaders at the Versailles chateau near Paris.In a statement, SAP said it will spend 150 million euros ($180 million) annually over the next five years on research and development in France.It plans to focus its efforts on emerging areas such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and blockchain—the technology that underpins bitcoin.SAP also said it would open an incubator in France, its second in Europe after Berlin, that would nurture over 50 start-ups and give them access to SAP’s software and cloud computing operations.It also promised to invest in early-stage ventures looking for their first seed money, and said it had already acquired the young French venture Recast.AI that builds so-called “chatbots”.Without giving a breakdown of its planned investments in France, SAP said overall it “estimates a more than two-billion-euro spend over five years”.Other firms attending Macron’s business summit in Versailles also unveiled new spending plans.Facebook said it will pour an additional 10 million euros into artificial intelligence in France by 2022. It also pledged to train 65,000 people in digital skills in free schemes to help women set up businesses and the long-term unemployed get back to work. SAP announced plans to invest in French start-ups Explore further Citation: SAP unveils big push into French tech start-ups (2018, January 22) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-sap-unveils-big-french-tech.html © 2018 AFP Facebook to train 65,000 in French job schemes This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

A year in Uber CEO works to rebuild companys reputation

first_imgQ: What’s the timeline for taking the company public, and do you think you can do it without being profitable?A: We’re looking at the second half of next year toward the end of the year. There are very few companies of our size that have the kind of growth rate or exciting new businesses like Uber Eats within the portfolio, and we’re showing progress toward profitability. We have to show a path to profitability.Q: What about the driverless car program? Is Toyota going to run it, and what are the plans for Toyota’s $500 million investment?A: We have an incredibly talented in-house team of engineers who are building hardware, software and operations to make self-driving cars a reality in a safe manner. An advantage we have now is we’re building self-driving technology while we have a live network in place, and ultimately we think there’s going to be a hybrid of self-driving technology and human-driven technology. We wanted to bring Toyota in as a valuable partner. Toyota is bringing in special cars that are going to be electric and that are built for ride sharing in urban destinations. Their expertise in self-driving and car manufacturing and our expertise with advanced technologies and our network will be an unbeatable combination.Q: Do you think that Toyota will help in terms of rebuilding the trust in Uber’s self-driving program after what happened in Phoenix?A: I think Toyota’s investment in us and their partnership with us speaks volumes about our efforts and their efforts. We have a lot to learn from Toyota in terms of manufacturing, technology, brand and safety. We’re here to learn, and the partnership is off to a great start. Ever since he stepped into his role as CEO a year ago, Dara Khosrowshahi has had to deal with wave after wave of major scandals and bad press, much of which he inherited from his predecessor, Travis Kalanick. Citation: A year in, Uber CEO works to rebuild company’s reputation (2018, September 6) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-year-uber-ceo-rebuild-company.html Uber rolls out safety features for drivers, passengers Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks during the company’s unveiling of the new features, in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Uber is aiming to boost driver and passenger safety in an effort to rebuild trust in the brand.(AP Photo/Richard Drew) About two weeks after Khosrowshahi started his job, London’s transport regulator decided to revoke Uber’s license to operate, jeopardizing the regional business with 3.5 million passengers. A court eventually gave Uber a license, although much shorter than normal.Later that year Uber was forced to come clean about covering up a major computer attack that stole personal information about more than 57 million customers and drivers. In February, Uber agreed to pay $245 million to Google’s self-driving car spinoff to end a legal brawl that aired out allegations that Uber stole technology.Perhaps the biggest problem came in March when an Uber self-driving test vehicle ran down and killed a pedestrian in the Phoenix suburb of Tempe, Arizona. Later it was disclosed that the human backup driver in the Uber SUV was streaming the television show “The Voice” on her phone and looking downward just before the crash.Under Khosrowshahi, Uber has been trying to shore up its reputation. It has made safety a top priority and on Wednesday, it revealed a suite of safety features for both drivers and passengers. Uber is also teaming up with Toyota to build self-driving cars for its ride-hailing service and will receive a $500 million investment from the Japanese automaker. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks during the company’s unveiling of the new features in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Uber is aiming to boost driver and passenger safety in an effort to rebuild trust in the brand. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Khosrowshahi sat down with The Associated Press to talk about his first year as CEO and how he plans to steer the company. Answers have been edited for space and clarity.Q: Aside from improving safety features, where do you see the company headed?A: Uber was a ride-hailing service, but really we want to think about Uber as a broad transportation platform which includes ride-hailing, Uber Eats, e-bikes, scooters—and eventually we’re going to integrate with mass transit. So if you work in a city and if you want to get from point A to point B, we want you to think about Uber. We ultimately want to be your one-stop shop for transportation.Q: You’ve been at Uber a year, and from the moment you walked through the door there have been problems. When do you feel like you’ve reached the point where you’ve stopped repairing the damage of your predecessor and are really making your mark on the company? Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks during the company’s unveiling of the new features in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. Uber is aiming to boost driver and passenger safety in an effort to rebuild trust in the brand.(AP Photo/Richard Drew) A: My predecessor made mistakes. I’m going to make mistakes as well. The fact is that I’ve inherited an incredible company with incredible talent. My predecessor and his team built a company that’s a verb. So no one’s perfect and there’s a lot that we’ve undertaken to fix. We have rebuilt the culture of the company, we have reprioritized safety as a number one priority for the company…I can tell you that a year in, I’m thrilled to be here and I’ve got a ton of work to do. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Nearly 80 per cent of Ujjwala recipients opted for refill PradhanNearly 80

first_imgSHARE With launch of Ujjwala scheme, 97% households in Karnataka have LPG connections Published on RELATED COMMENTS This has been the world’s largest poverty alleviation programme, said the Vice President of India COMMENT In the last 32 months, six crore LPG connections have been disbursed under the Ujjwala scheme. File photo   –  THE HINDU January 02, 2019 LPG ‘Ujjwala connections get three refills annually on an average’ SHARE SHARE EMAIL The Union Minister for Petroleum and Natural Gas, Dharmendra Pradhan, said that there have been 23 crore refills under the Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana till now.Speaking at an event,Pradhan said, “In the last 32 months, six crore connections have been disbursed under the Ujjwala scheme and 80 per cent of the recipients have opted for a refill of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) cylinders.”“There have been up to 12 refills in some cases but the average refilling is four for the Ujjwala connections,” he added.Lauding the Centre’s efforts for the success of the scheme, Vice President of India, M Venkaiah Naidu, said, “This has been the world’s largest poverty alleviation programme. There has been no comparable achievement by recent governments. LPG coverage stood at 50 per cent of the country in 2014 when the scheme started. It has now grown to 90 per cent in December 2018.”last_img read more