Relay For Life Of The Kenai Peninsula This Friday

first_imgThe opening ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. this Friday, June 1, with a welcome, introductions and recognition of sponsors. Beech: “The luminaria ceremony it’s to remember those we have lost, and then to honor those who have fought cancer or are currently fighting cancer.”  Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Participants in this year’s Relay For Life will gather together at Skyview Middle School to help fund cancer research and cancer patient programs by supporting the annual community-based fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. 7:00 pm – Studio 49 Stomp7:30 pm Results of To Cut or Not to Cut8:00 pm –  ZUMBA9:3o pm – Kenai Lions Club Breakfast11:00 pm – Luminaria Ceremony Johna Beech, lead state volunteer for the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network: “It’s always interesting how people talk about, the adjectives they use, when referencing to somebody that’s been diagnosed with cancer. You battle it, you fight it, you lose.”  The event will end at midnight. Money raised through Relay For Life events help the American Cancer Society fund  research and patient care programs and provide education and prevention information. Click for the full detailslast_img read more

Brothers Café Granted Rate Reduction Due To Construction

first_imgThe resolution allows Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander to reduce the percentage of gross receipts paid to the City be reduced from 10% to 5% for the months of February, March, April, and May 2019. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai City Council approved a resolution at their meeting on Wednesday to reduce the rate paid by Brother’s Cafe to the City of Kenai amid ongoing construction. The request was submitted by Hamilton on February 13 and stated that customer dissatisfaction with noise, parking, and terminal navigation, is impacting the business. Navarre: “When you’re disrupted in business, when you pay 5% of your gross sales, that doesn’t mean you make money when there is all this disruption and everything going on.” center_img The resolution was introduced by Vice Mayor Tim Navarre following a request from Jim Hamilton, owner of Brothers’ Café, requesting a temporary rate reduction in the percentage of gross receipts paid to the City due to loss of business since the terminal construction project started in October 2018. Construction is scheduled to wrap up December 1.last_img read more

Recent Wilmington Real Estate Transactions

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are the real estate transactions in Wilmington that occurred from April 17, 2019 to April 23, 2019:Address: 2 King StreetPrice: $685,000Buyer: Dylan & Taylor SempleSeller: Samuel & Siddhi ChhoengDate: 4/19/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 16,000sfAddress: 6 Leonard LanePrice: $900,000Buyer: Shonna & Jonathan ScalfaniSeller: Kenneth & Jill ChisholmDate: 4/19/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 35,401sfAddress: 44 Nathan RoadPrice: $925,000Buyer: Peter & Lauren HaistSeller: Andrew & Nancy BarrDate: 4/19/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 60,871sfAddress: 4 Seneca LanePrice: $672,500Buyer: Srujith & Nikhlia KudikalaSeller: Kevin & Barbara MurrayDate: 4/17/19Use: 1-Family ResidenceLot Size: 25,000sfLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedRecent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”Recent Wilmington Real Estate TransactionsIn “Business”Wilmington Real Estate Transactions (Week of August 13, 2019)In “Business”last_img read more

UPDATE Houston Harris Grant 75 Million to 28 NonProfits Helping Harvey Victims

first_imgAl Ortiz | Houston Public MediaHouston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Ed Emmett announce the recipients of the joint Harvey Relief Fund on October 3rd, 2017.Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Ed Emmett announced Tuesday the first 28 recipients of grants funded through the joint Fund the City and the County created to help Harvey victims.Tony Chase, co-chair of the Fund, says that, so far, they have raised approximately $79 million.The first round of grants amounts to $7.5 million and the chosen non-profits will use the money to provide services such as temporary housing, home repairs and rental assistance, among other things.Chase also says the goal is to have all the monies of the Fund distributed in the next nine to 12 months.The non-profits that received the funds include household names, such as Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston and the Salvation Army, but also groups that work in certain parts of greater Houston, like the Katy Christian Ministries and the Fifth Ward Community Redevelopment Corporation.Mayor Turner emphasized during a press conference to announce the grants that the help isn’t just for people with low income levels.“You may be middle income, OK? But all of your stuff is on the curb and you’ve exhausted your savings and your bank account. Well, you need help too,” Turner noted.The grant contracts specify the selected non-profits must use the funds for programs benefiting Harvey victims within the next 90 days. Listen 00:00 /00:59 X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share last_img read more

Documentary Examines Rise Of Militant NeoNazi Groups

first_img Share pbs.orgRiots in Charlottesville, Va. between Alt-Right demonstrators and counter protesters in 2017.Last month, a Frontline documentary called Documenting Hate: New American Nazis aired on PBS. The investigation from Frontline and ProPublica examines a neo-Nazi group that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military and how it’s gained strength after the 2017 Charlottesville rally, that erupted in violence.In the audio above, Houston Matters producer Maggie Martin talks with A.C. Thompson, a reporter with ProPublica, and correspondent for Frontline.Related Link: https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2018/11/21/312814/pbs-frontline-documentary-follows-neo-nazi-group-to-houston/last_img read more

Renew Football Season Tickets Enter for Giveways

first_img Print Friendly Version Season Ticket Renewal Story Linkscenter_img LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A new era of University of Louisville football was launched last December with the hiring of head coach Scott Satterfield, and fans can be a part of all the action by renewing their season tickets.The UofL ticket office has announced a number of exciting renewal incentives to ensure fans get an opportunity to be a part of the 2019 home schedule which features the season opener versus Notre Dame on Labor Day night and a visit from Clemson, the 2018 defending national champions.Fans who get a jump on purchasing season tickets will have the opportunity to win numerous prizes from an away game travel experience, gift cards from local sponsors, an opportunity to watch a preseason practice and a chance to win up to four seasons tickets to the six-game home schedule.To take advantage of this exciting opportunity, fans should renew their 2019 Louisville football season tickets. Once renewed, fans will automatically be entered into the drawings.If fans have already renewed their tickets, they will be auto-enrolled into the rewards drawings. Accounts must be paid in full or have begun the payment program to qualify for entry. Tickets must be renewed prior to noon on the day of the prize selection to be eligible.The first winner will be selected live on February 6. Winners will be announced every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday until the grand prize drawing on March 1. All renewed accounts will be eligible for the grand prize drawing, which is up to four free season tickets. Winning smaller prizes throughout the renewal program will not exclude fans from winning the grand prize.To renew your season tickets click hereFans are encouraged to follow @GoCards on Twitter visit or gocards.com/fbrenew each week to check out the weekly winner.For additional information, please contact the UofL Athletic Ticket Office at 502- 852-5151 or by email at tickets@gocards.com.Season Ticket Renewal PrizesFeb. 6 – Away Game Travel Experience for 2 (1 winner)Feb. 8 – $25 Fourth Street Live gift cards (25 winners)Feb. 11 – Participate in Card March (12 winners)Feb. 13 – $50 Liquor Barn gift card (1 winner)Feb. 15 – $50 Cardinal Stadium Concessions Vouchers (20 winners)Feb. 18 – $250 Kroger Gift Card (2 winners)Feb. 20 – Season Long Parking Upgrades (5 winners)Feb. 22 – Subs for a Year from Penn Station (10 winners)Feb. 25 – Exclusive PreSeason Practice Experience (10 winners)Feb. 27 – ULGC Foursome (5 winners)Mar. 1 – Four 2019 Season Ticketslast_img read more

Researchers create superrepellant surface material w video

first_img(Phys.org)—Researchers from the University of Michigan working in collaboration with associates from the US Air Force have created a new type of surface cover that repels oils, water, alkali solutions, acids and even non-Newtonian fluids. In their paper published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers describe their new material and the different ways it can repel various liquids. The material they’ve created works due to two separate aspects: its chemical structure and its physical layout. It’s based on a very small gauge steel mesh which has been coated with polymer (PDMS and POSS) beads. The unique pattern laid down limits surface area and has an overhanging structure that limits adhesion. Also, tiny air pockets between the beads prevent materials from actually touching other parts of the surface, preventing liquids from getting a grip.The researchers explain that surface repellents work in general by limiting the wetting hysteresis – the amount of deformation that occurs when a liquid hits a surface. Ideally the contact angle at both the front and rear of a drop remain the same – the result is a lessened impact area. In practical terms this means that the more a drop remains formed like a drop when it strikes, the less likely it is to adhere to a surface. Play Credit: J. Am. Chem. Soc., Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/ja310517s PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Credit: J. Am. Chem. Soc., Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/ja310517s The researchers demonstrated the material’s ability to repel liquids by shooting various liquids through a small jet at a covered surface and filming it as it bounced off instead of adhered. They also demonstrated that the covering also provides protection from chemical attack by dunking a coated aluminum plate into several acidic solutions. Its strength in doing so, the team explains, comes about from the same properties that prevent adhesion. If an acid cannot touch a surface (because of the air pockets) it cannot destroy it. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Play Credit: J. Am. Chem. Soc., Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/ja310517s Researchers have found it particularly difficult to develop surface covers that repel liquids that contain polymers, particularly non-Newtonian fluids. This is because such substances tend to deform almost immediately on contact. Thus, the challenge has been to discover a way to cause such fluids to retain their shape as they drop onto a surface. With the new material, the overhanging, eave-like edges of the beads prevent the liquid drop from distending while also preventing it from reaching an adjacent part of the surface. That limits the amount of distension and thus the deformation of the drop. More information: Superomniphobic Surfaces for Effective Chemical Shielding, J. Am. Chem. Soc., Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/ja310517sAbstractSuperomniphobic surfaces display contact angles >150° and low contact angle hysteresis with essentially all contacting liquids. In this work, we report surfaces that display superomniphobicity with a range of different non-Newtonian liquids, in addition to superomniphobicity with a wide range of Newtonian liquids. Our surfaces possess hierarchical scales of re-entrant texture that significantly reduce the solid–liquid contact area. Virtually all liquids including concentrated organic and inorganic acids, bases, and solvents, as well as viscoelastic polymer solutions, can easily roll off and bounce on our surfaces. Consequently, they serve as effective chemical shields against virtually all liquids—organic or inorganic, polar or nonpolar, Newtonian or non-Newtonian. Citation: Researchers create super-repellant surface material (w/ video) (2013, January 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-super-repellant-surface-material-video.html PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2013 Phys.org Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society Explore further Research duo discover why non-Newtonian fluids harden on impact PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenlast_img read more

Reworking informal businesses

first_imgAirbnb—the room rental company that does not own any rooms—has just sued the city of New York. Why? This is because the city has introduced a bill to penalise anyone who rents out their apartment for less than 30 days. This would effectively kill Airbnb’s business, which makes every household owner a potential hotelier. Airbnb provides an online listing system—anyone who owns a house, or many properties can rent out space. The business cuts into the profits of conventional hotels who have to buy land, build rooms and take care of the establishment. In Airbnb’s case, the costs are low and distributed. More importantly, thousands, even millions, of rooms suddenly become available, which eat into the market of house rentals or hotels. Airbnb is, not surprisingly, hitting old business, which also is hitting back.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIt is also difficult to regulate. Just think. How do city governments control millions of property owners who have become instant hoteliers? Airbnb argues that its reputational system, where owners and guests rate each other, regulates the informal market. Governments disagree. Airbnb is fighting similar battles in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin and even in its hometown of San Francisco, and the list is growing. Uber—the taxi service that does not own any cars—has similar battles on hand. Uber, and others like it, have turned every car owner into a potential service provider. All that Uber does is to aggregate these millions of car owners who have overnight become taxi drivers. This is why it can reduce costs and work the market—drastically undercut the market price and drive regular taxi service into the red. All this without owning a single car.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveUber and its variants are facing tremendous hostility from the old business. I saw this at close hand when the Supreme Court of India directed that all taxis, including those run by aggregators like Uber or Ola, should convert to CNG. This was done to reduce Delhi’s runaway air pollution. But the result of this seemingly simple order was out and out war. All taxi owners—from the black and yellow, radio taxi, to the tourist taxi and all India tourist taxi—converged at the Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority (I am a member of it), which is required to oversee the implementation of the Supreme Court’s direction. They had only one demand: stop Uber and Ola.  Our objective was different—to regulate the fuel used by taxis and not to stop their operations. But regulation is a challenge. In the very first meeting, the police informed us that they are helpless. They could not identify the taxi—every car had become a taxi. Uber and Ola told us that they were not taxi operators—only aggregators. In fact, their companies are registered as information technology providers. They were also not responsible for anything—customers hired cars using their platform and rated the service provided by drivers. The Delhi government had issued guidelines, which would curtail the operations of such aggregators, but Uber challenged this in the court. Finally, after weeks of protracted discussions, and often violent disagreements, it was agreed that all taxis, including those listed with the aggregators, would run on CNG. But all other issues, including the contentious issue of surge pricing, remained unresolved. Governments in India and abroad are battling with taxi operators and technology companies to formulate these rules. But why am I writing this now? The fact is Airbnb and Uber are part of the inevitable change in our future. The reason is that the modern world has formalised its economy to the point that it has become unviable. The brick-and-mortar world requires massive infrastructure, and this then requires regulations to ensure that all this operates within rules. The cost of regulations is also high and adds to the cost of running the economy. In my view, Uber and Airbnb are undercutting this world—by making the best use of the individual’s assets. In both cases, they are optimising existing resources—the cars and houses people own—to make more money and share the profits. But most importantly, these businesses are working the informal space. They are doing this to reduce costs and to expand opportunity. This is where we need to think further of what our world is about. In countries like India, informal business is the existing order of the day. Everything—from collecting sewage from homes, recycling garbage to providing transport in our cities—is managed by millions of myriad informal businesses. But we do not consider it part of our future. Worse, it defies regulation as we know it today. So, it must go. But given that the formal economy comes with costs, we cannot replace this informal and thriving business. But to kill it we neglect it; make it illegal, and altogether despise it. But still, it stays. We just can’t make it work. So, is it time we thought of a different business future? Let’s discuss this again.(The writer is Editor of Down To Earth magazine. Views expressed are strictly personal.)last_img read more

Rep Cole reports on hydraulic fracturing in Michigan

first_img13Aug Rep. Cole reports on hydraulic fracturing in Michigan Tags: Cole, Fracking, NCSL Categories: Cole News,Featured news,Newscenter_img Michigan lawmaker provides environmental update from NCSL conferenceState Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona, was recently selected by Michigan House Speaker Kevin Cotter, to serve on the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) for the 2015-2016 biennium.Last week at the National Conference of State Legislatures’ (NCSL) annual meeting, a panel consisting of environmentalists and skeptics of the oil industry took place regarding the highly-regulated practice of Hydraulic Fracturing and called for more burdensome regulations to avoid what they describe as a “race to the bottom.”Hydraulic Fracturing, a process that has been safely in use for over 60 years in Michigan without major incident, involves an operator that pumps a mixture of water, sand and a small amount of chemicals into an oil or gas formation deep underground and applies pressure. The pressure fractures rock layers, releasing oil or gas reserves. The sand holds the fractures open to continue allowing the oil or gas to flow into the well. Innovative advancements in technology have led to the consolidation of gas wells onto one small pad site thereby drastically reducing the surface footprint, number of access roads, and pipelines needed to harness the valuable energy resource.Hydraulic fracturing is also referred to as hydrofracking, hydrofracturing, or simply “fracking”.Fracking allows residents to enjoy some of the most cost-effective energy supplies in the country while also decreasing our reliance on coal-burning power plants, many of which will soon be taken offline thanks to the same federal regulations this panel of so-called experts wants to modify.The Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has a sterling record of environmental protection against oil and gas operations, and most of the country consider Michigan’s rules and regulations to be some of the most stringent in the entire nation. “Stronger federal legislation” is simply not needed in Michigan’s case.While Michigan is blessed with vast water resources, we have a responsibility to use them wisely. Michigan’s oil and natural gas producers make conservation a priority. Almost every industry uses water and, like every other industry, our local oil and gas businesses ensure water use is proportionate to the amount readily available, so as to protect the environment and other water needs.An oil or natural gas operator intending to use a large volume of water (defined as 100,000 gallons or more per day over a 30 day period) is required to use the state’s Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool to assure the water withdrawal will be safe. If the tool indicates a potential adverse impact, Michigan regulatory officials conduct a site-specific investigation and can require the operator to obtain water from other sources or to move the proposed water well. Approvals are not given if a proposed withdrawal is determined to negatively affect resources.In fact, the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) of the U.S. federal government—the same federal government these folks would like to see further regulate the industry—recently came to the conclusion that after a four-year study hydraulic fracturing is being carried out safely by industry and regulated by states and isn’t having “widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water.”Finally, there have not ever been reported cases of illness or other such effects of hydraulic fracturing in Michigan. Independent operators and the DEQ maintain the strictest personal and environmental safety on all operations and there has yet to be a report of serious illness on an individual as a result of such activities.Not only does Michigan’s oil and gas industry keep the lights and heat on in our homes and businesses and employ our residents, but in 2016 it also funded more than 50 percent of the Michigan State Parks budget.  Michigan’s oil and gas industry, through both the Natural Resources Trust Fund, which has given away over $1 billion to local communities through grants aimed exclusively at parks and recreation, as well as the Michigan State Parks Endowment Fund truly takes care of the amazing parks and recreation areas around our beautiful state and will continue to do so for many years.#####last_img read more

OTT TV providers need to tackle churn just as urge

first_imgOTT TV providers need to tackle churn just as urgently as pay TV companies, says Gilles Domartini, CEO and founder, Cleeng.We hear a lot about churn in traditional pay TV but how big a challenge is churn for OTT TV operators?Both pay TV and OTT providers have churn as a main challenge. The main differences between the two is closely related to payments and customer experience.Regarding payments, most traditional pay TV providers have classic, invoice-based payments that are highly predictable and standardised. In the OTT case, most consumers use credit cards to do transactions. On average, these cards expire in three years, meaning you lose 3% monthly due to payment failure alone.Regarding the customer experience, pay TV providers have a predictable infrastructure as they own the network, provide the set-top boxes etc. In OTT, this infrastructure or consumption platform is unknown to the operator, as viewers may watch their content on desktop, mobile, via apps or the web, with varying quality.Ultimately, churn can be fatal. It isn’t unusual among the prospects that reach out to us to see churn rates ranging from 20% to 40%. Improving these metrics is essential to reach a positive ROI and continue to grow your subscriber base year-on-year.What do SVOD and OTT TV companies need to put in place to predict churn with a degree of accuracy?The answer sounds simple but it turns complex in practice.Looking at this from an OTT service perspective, the quality standards need to be raised significantly. Churn can become hard to control, as it can happen at any point during the customer journey, due to various reasons like payment failure, a thin content catalogue, low engagement levels, bad viewing experience, lack of customer support, etc.Having a clear and comprehensive view on the full customer journey is a must. This journey starts from the initial login or registration, choosing a payment method, and ends with interaction with customer support.Once you have mapped this flow, you need to consolidate the relevant data from all the available data points, and build a 360° view of your users’ behaviour, considering all the possible scenarios.For example, when you can see a case when a user hasn’t logged on in the past couple of months and his payment card is expiring soon, you can design a campaign to retain that user.How far can analysis of customer data help OTT operators address the problem?We believe, very far. The analysis of customer data is critical and can help on many fronts. At the start, it gives you a better insight of your users’ behaviour. That gives you ammunition to tackle churn. Knowing exactly why subscribers left can help you improve your service by fine-tuning your content strategy, improving streaming quality, adjusting your marketing targeting etc.Once you master that practice, you can start to predict behaviour. Just a few companies are currently doing this well, and this will be key for the battle against the big guns, like Netflix and Amazon.What are examples of the types of measures can OTT TV providers put in place to reduce churn?Churn deserves a serious focus and a break-down of all the factors causing it. Once you understand all the different causes and their impact levels, it’s easier to define an improvement plan. Currently, most of the tech vendors focus on the payment-generated factors for churn, like transaction failures, expired cards and low balances and set up mechanisms for streamlining that flow. This is important, yet insufficient.We have identified two other critical groups of factors:Engagement-generated or what defines the usage of your service: frequency and time of viewing, quality of experience (buffering, start/pause).Satisfaction-generated or what defines how happy viewers are with your service: the number of support inquires, languages support, NPS score.Once you master these three dimensions, you can truly tackle churn effectively.What can Cleeng specifically offer to help operators tackle churn?Cleeng opted for a video focused, data-driven, 360° take on churn. We have the benefit of focusing strictly on e-commerce video solutions (PPV, SVOD), and that allows us to integrate the tech ecosystem into one solution and build a comprehensive dashboard.We are super-confident about our new, unique product, named Cleeng ChurnIQ. It empowers OTT broadcasters to tackle churn at all the phases of the customer journey, from login, to payment, consumption, ending with customer care.We have integration with authentication, payment, front-end, QoE, and marketing solutions to achieve this. It’s all about prediction and action.We consolidate all these data points and present the insights via an easy-to-digest dashboard designed for the OTT decision maker. Together with the prediction tools, decision makers are fully equipped to take actions that reduce churn, minimise workload and optimise ROI.We encourage you to see ChurnIQ in action. Book a demo at the upcoming NAB Show.This Q&A is sponsored content.last_img read more