Action Codes Continue to Gain Traction in Magazines

first_imgQR codes and their ilk continue to rise in usage by publishers, according to a study out today by mobile marketing and technology services company Nellymoser. In the second quarter, the top 100 magazines by circulation featured a variety of mobile action codes in 2,200 instances, a 61 percent jump over the first quarter this year.The study doesn’t track scan rates or actions taken post scan, but the printing of QR codes, digital watermarks and other action codes is definitely on the rise—in the first quarter of 2011, there was a comparatively modest 352 codes printed. And, at the end of first half 2012, the number of action codes printed is already coming close to the 4,468 that were printed during all of 2011.See Also: Mobile Action Codes Increased 439 Percent in Top 100 Mags Last YearWhile the instances of codes appearing in the top 100 magazines went from 1,365 to 2,200 the number specifically appearing in advertisements also jumped, going from 5 percent of ad pages in the second quarter 2011 to 10 percent this year. For the first time all 100 of the top magazines featured at least one action code. And of all the codes, QR codes are still the most prevalent, with more than 80 percent market share since December 2011. The beauty, health and automotive categories accounted for 49 percent of all action codes in the second quarter, with automotive more than doubling its use of codes between the first and second quarter. Video continues to be the most common use for action codes, with 40 percent of codes leading to a product demo, behind the scenes look or some other clip. Sweepstakes and social sharing were also heavily used at 20 percent of instances. For more, see the full study here.Action Codes by QuarterSource: Nellymoser, Inc.last_img read more

Fastspreading pig Ebola virus in China to upset global meat trade balance

first_img Meet Sierra Leones only female surfer ReutersThe fast-spreading pig virus has infected nearly one million hogs in China, a major producer of pork in the world. The outbreak of the virus will soon see major repercussions on China’s economy and even on global trade. The Pig ‘Ebola’ virus, also known as the African swine fever, was first detected in Cambodia. The virus then spread to China, one of the biggest producers of pork in the world. The virus has infected some 400 million pigs, about half the country’s swine population, according to Bloomberg.With the culling of the infected pigs, the population of swine will effectively go down, thus creating dependency on other meat. Australia, which is a major beef provider, could increase the rates of the meat, starting a domino effect in the markets across the world.In addition to this, the infected meat transported from Japan to Australia was detected at airports, leading to the ban of products and causing a bigger crunch for the pig farmers. The report explains that the livelihood of the pig producers has been affected, which in turn makes them increase the rates of the pork produced.The swine fever does not affect humans, but in pigs they can spread like wildfire and kill the animals. The virus causes a hemorrhagic illness in pigs which will kill them soon, not unlike the effects of the human Ebola virus. The disease can spread through dirt, interaction between the animals and food and water. The Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain assured that the food chain will not be affected since the infected meat has been removed completely. However, it was talking about the outbreak of the virus in Belgium.Reports claim that the virus was introduced in the European Union in 2014 and has been spreading at a speed of 200 kilometres per year, triggering massive losses for the economy. Some of the measures China has taken to stop the spread of the virus include killling one million pigs, banning the movement of healthy hogs outside the infected areas and closure of markets. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:02/7:31Loaded: 0%0:02Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-7:29?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img Closelast_img read more

Dozens of Texas Districts Must Improve Failing Schools – Or Outside Managers

first_img Share Dozens of school districts across Texas — including Houston — are currently on track to face tough, new sanctions, if their elected officials don’t improve chronically failing schools by next August.The Texas Education Commissioner could replace the school boards in all those districts, following a tough “no excuses” law passed by state lawmakers in 2015.“It changes our focus from the level of the campus to the absolute top — where I think needs to be  — sort of school boards and superintendents,” said Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath at a hearing last August.The option to install a board of managers has been available to the commissioner before. But it’s usually reserved for districts with widespread academic struggles as well as financial mismanagement.This law, known as House Bill 1842, allows the commissioner to appoint outside managers if a district has even one campus that chronically fails the state’s standards for five or more years. Then, the district’s elected officials could face the consequences – and lose their jobs.News 88.7 analyzed the data from the Texas Education Agency and found more than forty districts that could see an outside board of managers as early as next year, if their school ratings don’t change by 2018.On the list: the Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio districts.“The stakes are going to be very high this year. If districts don’t begin to see some improvements, then some of those more difficult choices under the law are going to start to come into play,” said David Thompson, an attorney with the firm Thompson and Horton.The Houston Independent School District could end up becoming the poster child for the law’s sanctions and strict timeline. It’s the biggest district in Texas, with more than 200,000 students and a $2 billion budget. Plus, it has the most schools — more than a dozen — that have missed the state’s standards for three or more years. In Texas education parlance, they’re labeled “improvement required.”“While I think it’s unfair, it’s also incumbent upon us to do our jobs. And one school with multiple years of (improvement required) is too many,” said HISD trustee Rhonda Skillern-Jones.She represents Kashmere High School, which has failed state standards for the last seven years. That’s the worst record of any campus in the state. Several other campuses in her district in Northeast Houston are struggling to meet state standards as well.Laura Isensee/Houston Public MediaStudents on a youth council and members of a community board helped create a new Kashmere Success Center on campus to provide wrap-around services for students. The marching band celebrated the opening in 2016.Other HISD schools that have persistently missed state standards: Wheatley and Worhing high schools.“And so I think it’s critical that we move the needle for these kids. But more importantly, for the kids. Not because we need to stay compliant with the law,” Skillern-Jones added.Some intermediate steps spelled out in the law have already happened, primarily two-year turnaround plans for the struggling campuses.But the clock is ticking for districts to improve all the chronically failing campuses – or face the consequences.“This bill is designed on a fundamental basis of what gets measured, gets fixed,” said state Sen. Paul Bettencourt, R-Houston.“You know, is it going to be eight years? Is it going to be 12 years? You just can’t look the other way anymore.”And now, Texas education officials are watching closely.“I don’t think we can sit back and kind of arm-chair quarterback and complain about under-performing teachers at  an individual campus when in fact it’s the leadership at the district level that sets the stages whether they can succeed or not,” Morath told Bettencourt and other senators last year.Morath previously was a school board trustee himself in Dallas, until Gov. Greg Abbott named him the state’s education chief.“I used to quip when I was on the school board before that, you know, there are not enough layers in the bureaucracy to protect teachers from our foolishness,” Morath said. X 00:00 /04:03 00:00 /01:11 Listen center_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen X Across Texas, local voters elect their board of trustees, who then hire the superintendent, guide policy and set the budget for their local public schools.That’s why some view the risk of an outside board of managers as an extreme option.Thompson described it as an “almost nuclear option of the governance of an entire community’s schools.”“If you think about it, you’re not just telling the school board, ‘We don’t think you’re doing a good job.’ You’re literally telling a community, ‘We don’t think you as a community are capable of governing yourselves,’” he explained.The Texas Education Agency declined to comment for this story, saying they had to wait until the agency officially releases 2017 school ratings later this month.But Thompson said that he’s concerned Texas is ratcheting up sanctions while it shrinks financial support.“Setting standards or requirements and then not providing the means to meet those requirements isn’t accountability. It is simply punishment,” he said.“And there is a lot of concern among school districts that – to use an old Texas phrase – the state is all hat and no cattle.”The commissioner could choose another option. Instead of suspending elected officials, he could close low-performing campuses.Laura IsenseeIn HISD, and other Texas independent school districts, local voters elect trustees to direct policy, set budgets and hire the superintendent.In Houston, HISD trustee Skillern-Jones said that she would rather lose her job than close a school like Kashmere High.“Put in a board of managers and that affects nine board members’ lives,” she said. “You close the school down, especially one like Kashmere, you affect 500 families and kids. And I think that’s not the correct action to take.”Because, she said, when schools close, the community suffers and poverty snowballs even more.School districts like Houston will know more where they stand after the state released the 2017 school accountability ratings later this month.Some districts could improve and escape the risk of a state take-over.For others that still have persistently low-performing schools, the pressure could increase, because then, the process to appoint a board of managers – or close campuses – will ramp up with one more year of low ratings in 2018. Houston ISDNews 88.7 found more than 40 Texas school districts that could see an outside board of managers as early as next year, if their school ratings don’t change by 2018.last_img read more

Acknowledging efforts of Ponty Chadha Foundation

first_imgMata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan, an initiative of The Ponty Chadha Foundation, recently received the ‘National Award for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan) 2018’ by the Vice-President Venkaiah Naidu. The award was received by Shanam Chadha, Trustee – The Ponty Chadha Foundation at a function organised by Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan) under the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment on the occasion of International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The institution got the award under the category – ‘Best Institution working for Cause of Persons with Disabilities’. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfManpreet Singh Chadha, Founder Member, and Trustee, The Ponty Chadha Foundation said, “It was my father’s vision to create an environment where children with special needs could become socially and economically independent, and today I am proud that his dream project has reached this pinnacle. Working on his philosophy and vision, we strive to work towards creating a better society for the special children. I am thankful for all the support received from the Principal, teachers, parents, and well-wishers who have worked tirelessly towards the betterment of this segment.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveOn the development, Dr Vandana Sharma, Director, and Principal, Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan School said, “It’s a great pleasure for all of us to be acknowledged with this prestigious award. We have been trying very hard to achieve the highest standards of rehabilitation service for the community of differently abled. Now it’s time to celebrate the vision of our founders and take our mission forward with greater motivation. We humbly accept the award with gratitude and a sense of greater responsibility towards empowerment of children and adults with special needs every year.” Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan was founded in 1999 by Gurdeep Singh Chadha (Ponty Chadha) with a mission to educate and prepare special children to live within the community, having achieved three-fold self-dependence – physical, social and financial to the best of their abilities. The school is one of the largest private charitable rehabilitation institutions, which provides free-of-cost service to over 1000 students.last_img read more

Airline defendants to pay US95 million in 911 case

first_img Thursday, November 23, 2017 NEW YORK — Insurers for American Airlines, United Airlines and other aviation defendants have agreed to pay $95 million to settle claims that security lapses led planes to be hijacked in the Sept. 11 attacks.The settlement was described in papers filed Tuesday in Manhattan federal court. Developers of the new World Trade Center buildings had once demanded $3.5 billion from aviation-related companies after hijacked planes destroyed three skyscrapers among five demolished buildings on Sept. 11, 2001.Lawyers said the agreement signed last week resulted from “extensive, arms-length negotiations” by lawyers “who worked diligently for months.” The agreement also said the parties make no admissions or concessions with respect to liability for the attacks.“The court’s approval of the settlement agreement will bring to a close this hard-fought 13-year litigation on terms agreeable to the parties,” the lawyers said.Attorney Desmond T. Barry Jr., who submitted the papers to U.S. District Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein, declined to comment Wednesday.More news:  Save the dates! Goway’s Africa Roadshow is backDeveloper Larry Silverstein and World Trade Center Properties have collected more than $5 billion from other defendants through lawsuits. The money has aided the reconstruction of buildings on the 16-acre lower Manhattan site.Earlier settlements included $135 million paid to a financial services firm that lost two-thirds of its employees.American Airlines spokesman Matt Miller said the company is pleased to have reached a settlement.“We will never forget that terrible day and its lasting impact including the tragic loss of 23 members of the American Airlines family,” said Miller.United Airlines declined to comment.Bud Perrone, a spokesman for Silverstein, said the company is “pleased to have finally reached a resolution to this piece of post-9-11 litigation.” << Previous PostNext Post >> Source: The Associated Presscenter_img Airline defendants to pay US$95 million in 9/11 case Sharelast_img read more