Notley says BC pipeline court challenge illogical harmful if successful

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the B.C. government’s attempt to get court backing in a bid to thwart the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion would put Canada in “economic gridlock” if it succeeds.British Columbia is seeking control over increased levels of diluted bitumen coming into the province because of concerns of increased risk to the environment.Notley says if the B.C. Court of Appeal agrees the government has the right to do so, that would open the door to provinces regulating all kinds of goods coming in from the rest of Canada — to the detriment of the economy as a whole.Notley says her government will seek intervener status in the court proceedings and she expects B.C. will fail.She also says the legal move is illogical.She notes that B.C. wants control over more bitumen coming into the province via pipeline on environmental safety grounds, but is OK with current levels already coming in.“It makes no sense,” Notley said Thursday from Slave Lake, Alta. “If bitumen were so hazardous, why would we only be looking at the (extra) incremental bitumen that’s in the new pipeline?“This isn’t about environment. This is about the new pipeline … I think the courts will see right through it.”In Calgary, United Conservative Leader Jason Kenney said the court reference is one more delay tactic in a pipeline project that is already on the edge of an abyss.Operator Kinder Morgan has stopped extra spending on the project and is to decide by the end of May if it will go forward, given the opposition from B.C.Kenney said Notley’s government has not been strong enough to dissuade B.C. or to get Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government to take action on a project that it already approved.“None of this gives Kinder Morgan the certainty it needs to proceed with this $7-billion, job-creating investment that would help us get a fair price for our oil,” said Kenney.Companies in this story: (TSX:KML)last_img read more

Political myths fog crucial Alberta election debate over carbon taxes economist

first_imgThe commission has just published a report on carbon tax misconceptions.The worst, Ragan said, is that a carbon tax doesn’t work.“If you look at B.C., if you look at California, if you look at the U.K, if you look at Quebec, these policies do work. What they don’t do is work overnight.”At least five different published studies have found British Columbia’s carbon tax, introduced in 2008, has cut overall emissions, reduced per capita gasoline use by seven per cent, improved average vehicle efficiency by four per cent, cut residential natural gas use by seven per cent and diesel use by more than three per cent.Meanwhile, the province enjoyed about three per cent annual economic growth between 2012 and 2017.Other jurisdictions that have successfully used carbon taxes to reduce emissions include Sweden, Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands, several U.S. states, the U.K. and the European Union. EDMONTON, A.B. – Between politicians who fog the truth and the ones just in a fog, Chris Ragan wants to fan fresh air into a carbon tax debate that is clouding Alberta’s provincial election and drifting into an upcoming federal campaign.“It’s pretty clear this issue is warming up politically,” said Ragan, head of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission, a non-partisan group of academics and business leaders focused on economic and environmental solutions.“We have been sorry to see that there’s a bunch of stuff out there that is either misunderstanding or poorly explained. There are a bunch of myths out there.” Three separate studies found B.C.’s tax either didn’t affect jobs or added them. A fourth found a small decrease in jobs for less-educated workers. Studies in the U.S. or the U.K. found little or no impact on job numbers.The commission’s report finds that far from hurting families, 70 per cent of Canadian households will receive more in carbon tax rebates than they pay.Energy economists such as Mark Jaccard at B.C.’s Simon Fraser University argue that regulations get faster, bigger results and are politically easier to enact. The big cuts to Canada’s carbon emissions, he said, have come from closing coal-fired power plants and clean fuel rules.“Some people will tell you you have to have carbon pricing,” he said on a recent podcast. “That’s not true. You could do it all through regulations.”center_img You could, concedes Ragan. But that would cost the economy more. Besides, he said, bringing in carbon taxes gives governments an opportunity to cut other levies such as income tax.Albertans who believe the province could escape a carbon tax by rescinding provincial legislation may also be mistaken.Martin Olszynski, a University of Calgary law professor, said all Ottawa would have to do is pass an order in council to bring Alberta under the same federal tax that recently came into effect in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and New Brunswick. None of those provinces had its own tax.“It’s a matter of getting cabinet together and writing the order,” Olszynski said.Looking to the courts to block Ottawa’s tax is an iffy bet, he suggested.In court hearings on Saskatchewan’s anti-tax constitutional challenge, Olszynski said, judges asked if allowing Ottawa to regulate greenhouse gases as a matter of “national concern” would impede provincial efforts to do the same.“If you recognize this matter as a matter of national concern, you would strip away the provincial ability to regulate these things,” he summarized.But Olszynski notes that courts have recognized that many issues _ especially environmental ones _ are best managed jointly between national and provincial governments.Other federal arguments in favour of a national carbon tax are backed by decades of case law, Olszynski added.Ragan said the debate over carbon taxes is as important to Canada’s future as debates over the GST or free trade with the United States.“It’s a big policy issue and it’s appropriate that we’re talking about it now.”Ragan just wishes the debate wasn’t so mythical.“We live in a democratic society where people play partisan politics. Those political debates don’t always stick to the facts.”last_img read more

We wanted to win this title badly says Chhetri

first_imgMumbai: An elated Bengaluru FC skipper Sunil Chhetri termed his team’s maiden Indian Super League victory against FC Goa as a “sweet one” especially after his side had faltered in the summit clash last season against Chennaiyin FC. Courtesy Rahul Bheke’s championship-winning header in the second extra time, Bengaluru defeated FC Goa 1-0 in an edge of a seat thriller last night here to win their maiden ISL title. Bengaluru had last year lost last year’s final to Chennaiyin FC Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”Last year after the final, I said next year we’ll come back. Right from the ball boy to Carles (Cuadrat the coach), everyone wanted this. We wanted to win it (the title) badly. When you lose the way we did last year, it’s sweet to win this one. Asia, we are back,” Chhetri said at the post match media conference late Sunday night. Now by winning the ISL, Bengaluru FC will play in the AFC Asian Cup next year. Chhetri also said it was “commendable” that a player like Ferran Corominas, who bagged the Golden Boot award, did not get any chance against his team on all the three occasions when the two teams clashed. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later”The message from the coach was that we should try to attack but as soon as we lose the ball, we should fall back and defend and have numbers (at the back). For players like me, Miku and Udanta (Singh), it was not easy because we are attacking minded people,” Chhetri said. “I am happy we did it because Nishu (Kumar) and (Harmanjot) Khabra got that security when Udanta and I traced back. It is commendable that a player like Coro (Corominas) did not get open chances against us in three games,” he said. “Last year, we conceded off set pieces and we were dominant until those two goal, so we were sure on not letting it happen today,” he added. Asked where he would rate this win, Chhetri quipped, Top-two. Number 2.” The winning coach Carles Cuadrat said that the team was trying not to take the game to the penalties as then it can be anybody’s game. “We were trying not to get into tie-breaker as it then becomes a lottery a lot of times. We are happy that one ball in the box gave us the victory. This is the seventh goal done by a set-piece and it shows how important set pieces are in the game, Cuadrat said. Meanwhile, FC Goa coach Sergio Lobera termed Ahmed Jahouh being sent off the field after earning a red card as the key moment of the match. “The key moment was when were reduced to 10-men in the first half of extra time. It was a very tight game was going to be a matter of small details and the sending off was a big handicap for us,” Lobera said. Despite the loss, the FC Goa head coach said he was proud of his players. “Till today, we were focused today only on this game (the final). From tomorrow onwards, we will start working towards the (upcoming) Super Cup. I said to my players in the dressing room that I am proud of them and (what) they have done in the season.”last_img read more

RBI Governor to meet heads of payments banks later this week

first_imgNew Delhi: RBI Governor Shaktikanta Das Monday said he will be meeting heads of payments banks later this week to understand their issues and concerns. As many as seven payments banks have commenced their operations. He also said that guidelines on regulatory sandbox will be issued in the next two months to promote FinTech in the country. A sandbox approach means experimenting and learning before finally adopting a technology or system. This approach helps in containing the impact of failures.last_img read more

Transferred police personnel assume duty

first_imgKolkata: In a major reshuffle in the IPS rank, the state government awarded posting to four IPS officers including the then Commissioner of Police(CP) of Kolkata and Bidhannagar who were removed by the Election Commission on Friday late night. Jayanta Kumar Basu, who was serving as Director, Directorate of Economic Offences, was appointed as ADG, Establishment. On Friday, the Election Commission had removed CP Kolkata Anuj Sharma and CP, Bidhannagar, Gyanwant Singh from their respective posts along with two IPS officers holding the post of Superintendent of Police (SP) in Bolpur and Diamond Harbour police district respectively. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaAccording to the order published on Saturday by the state Home & Hill Affairs department, Anuj Sharma has been posted as the Additional Director General (ADG), Operations, whereas Gyanwant has been posted as the Director of the Directorate of Economic Offences in the rank of ADG. Apart from the two top cops, SP Diamond Harbour S Selvamurugan has been transferred to the post of Commandant (CO) of State Armed Police (SAP), 6th Battalion. Avvaru Rabindranath who was posted in Bidhannagar Police has been made SP Birbhum replacing Shyam Singh who has been transferred to CO, SAP 13th Battalion. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayMeanwhile, as per the EC order, Rajesh Kumar took over charge as Kolkata CP and Natarajan Ramesh Babu assumed charge as CP, Bidhannagar on Saturday afternoon. Kumar, after taking over charge, said he would ensure conductance of free and fair elections in the state. “Kolkata Police is a prestigious unit and its system is unquestionable. Several steps have already taken by the Kolkata Police which are very good and effective,” he added.last_img read more

Lightning strikes twice Moeller out for second straight season

Tyler Moeller is no stranger to bad luck. Perhaps that’s how he knew more of it was coming when he suited up to play Illinois on Saturday. While the senior defensive back was pulling up his uniform pants, he could feel a tweak on the left side of his chest that had bothered him since partially tearing his left pectoral muscle in 2008. By his own count, he’s partially torn the muscle 10 to 12 times during the last two-and-a-half years. Those injuries never fully healed, and Moeller could sense that it was only a matter of time before it would cost him. “I kind of thought it was a ticking time bomb,” Moeller said. “Something big was going to happen eventually.” Sure enough, something did happen. During Illinois’ opening drive, Moeller tried to wrap up Illini running back Mikel Leshoure. Moeller’s left arm was pulled back violently as the hard-charging Leshoure burst through his arm tackle. Before hitting the turf, he could feel the muscle rip from the bone. As he got up and rushed toward the sidelines, Moeller knew his fate. “I knew it was totally torn when it happened,” Moeller said. “I ran off the field, and the trainers didn’t even have to tell me what was wrong. I knew what was wrong.” Moeller had completely torn his left pectoral muscle, finishing his season and possibly his career at Ohio State. The NCAA must grant him a medical redshirt and a sixth year of eligibility for him to return. But none of that news could dim the radiant smile Moeller wore on his face as he addressed the media on the eve of his surgery Tuesday night, accepting his latest misfortune. “Bad things happen,” Moeller said. “You have to keep your head up and you have to work hard. Then you can overcome everything.” Moeller, who missed all of last season with head injuries he sustained during an attack in Florida, will have to overcome another setback. “It’s really sad for a guy to be able to put so much work into something and have it taken away twice in a row,” defensive tackle Dexter Larimore said. “It is kind of tough for everybody on the team, especially since he was a great player for us and did some great things.” The injury comes just as his career was finally taking off. Before Moeller came to OSU in 2006, he was a relentless pass rusher at Colerain High School in Cincinnati. He spent his Friday nights wreaking havoc in the offensive backfield, recording 15.5 sacks and 29 tackles for loss as a senior. But questions regarding his 6-foot-1-inch, 210-pound stature clouded the outlook of his future. Seen as too big to play safety but too small to play linebacker, Moeller developed into a solid defender on special teams during the 2007 and 2008 seasons. “I wanted to be a linebacker,” Moeller said. “I always had the mentality. I wish I had the mentality to play safety because linebacker kind of beat me up.” During the summer of 2008, Moeller partially tore his left pectoral muscle for the first time. Unable to fix the injury with surgery and too focused on the season to bother with rehab, Moeller essentially played 2008 with only one functioning arm. “I was younger then, so I wasn’t as intelligent as I am now,” Moeller said. “If I could do it again, I would definitely rehab it a lot more.” He made his first career start at linebacker, strangely enough, against Illinois in 2008. He recorded seven tackles, including two for a loss and forced a fumble. Before the 2009 season, Moeller was expected to win a starting linebacker job, even though doubts about his chest problems and size still lingered. But those issues would prove to be the least of his troubles. On July 26, 2009, Moeller was with his family in Florida to celebrate his grandparents’ 50th wedding anniversary. He doesn’t remember much else from that night. While eating at Gators Cafe and Saloon in Treasure Island, Moeller was punched in the face by Ralph Gray Decker, 28, of Kenneth City, Fla., in what was described as an “unprovoked” attack by an assistant state attorney. The back of Moeller’s head smacked against the ground as he fell, leaving him to spend the coming days fighting for his life in a Florida intensive care unit. Details of the altercation with Decker remain murky because of legal issues, but on June 3, Decker pleaded guilty to assaulting Moeller and in August was sentenced to two years of probation. He’s paid the Moeller family more than $11,000 in medical expenses. After the attack, Moeller had severe memory loss and trouble speaking. Doctors learned there was bleeding in his brain and had to drill two dime-sized holes into his skull, which now has a metal plate. Moeller said the surgery had him worried for his life, even if only for a little bit. “I was worried in the beginning, going into surgery,” Moeller said. “But after surgery I knew I was fine and was going to be OK.” Even though some doctors suggested he should’ve ended his football career, Moeller’s passion for the game wouldn’t let him stop. “Why would I want to keep playing? Because I love it,” Moeller said. “I love the game of football.” He spent the next few months preparing for his return to the football field. Unable to train for more than seven months, he spent most of his time away from the football team, focusing on his school work. He couldn’t participate in any contact drills until summer practice, but by the time the season started, coach Jim Tressel had a spot for him that would maximize the speed and physicality of the undersized Moeller. Inserted at the “star” position, which is a hybrid between a linebacker and a defensive back, Moeller’s tenacity resurfaced immediately during the season-opener against Marshall as he registered seven tackles, a sack and a forced fumble. It was good enough to earn him Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week. Moeller would spend the next three games harassing the offensive backfield unlike any time since high school, recording 12 tackles and 2.5 tackles for loss during that span. But his comeback would be cut short after his season-ending injury against Illinois. And even though the injury isn’t comparable to the one he suffered at the hands of Decker, the two injuries are related. Because of the brain surgery, Moeller was unable to exert himself physically enough to treat the lingering pectoral damage he suffered in 2008, leaving him vulnerable to more damage. He hasn’t bench pressed in two years. The Moeller family has forgiven Decker for his crime. Tyler, who no longer suffers from short-term memory loss, said he’s moved on from the attack. “I don’t really think about it anymore,” Moeller said. “If he’s sorry or not, I don’t really care. I wish him all the best. I hope he controls his inner demons.” The Buckeyes’ loss of Moeller can’t be understated. As one of the most effective pass rushers and leaders on the team, Tressel knows he won’t be easy to replace. “You just feel sick for him because you saw the pain he was in last year not being able to help his teammates and now he was, and now he was having fun,” Tressel said. “So, yeah, it’s very disappointing and obviously it hurts us.” Moeller won’t be able to train for the next three months but he expects to be much more involved with the team this year and help freshman Christian Bryant take over his role at the “star” position. Regardless of whether his career as a Buckeye is over, the ever-resilient Moeller expects to play football again at an even greater level. “I know I can play at that caliber level, and if I can get a medical redshirt, I’ll be better than ever,” Moeller said. “I’ll have a chest to work with and my legs will be stronger.” As unlucky as Moeller has been for the last two years, he refuses to let bitterness consume him. Moeller thrives on confidence, even while on the road to recovery. It’s a road he knows very well. read more

The Sweet shot Aaron Craft lifts Buckeyes to Sweet 16

DAYTON – In the middle of an arena packed to the rafters with crazed fans standing anxiously, on a court with defenders eying him and teammates yelling for the ball, Aaron Craft remained calm. The score of the third-round NCAA Tournament game between No. 2 seed Ohio State and No. 10 seed Iowa State was tied, 75-75, with the shot clock off and the contest’s final seconds ticking down. Craft dribbled the ball just outside the right wing, with Georges Niang, a freshman forward, isolated on him. “Give me the ball!” shouted junior forward Deshaun Thomas, who clapped twice after screaming at his junior point guard from the top of the key. “I’m open! I’m open!” roared junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr., who stood unguarded in the right corner. Craft waved them off. He had run the play coach Thad Matta drew up in the huddle – a pick-and-roll intended to free Thomas for an open look – but Iowa State doubled the junior forward, meaning a big man was left to defend OSU’s rosy-cheeked floor leader. “He made the right read. (Thomas) was going to have to catch it with his back to the basket. I was fine with it. I’ve said from day one, I’ll live with any decision that kid makes,” Matta said. Craft waited until the game clock reached three, dribbled hard to the 3-point line, rose up, and fired a shot. Swish. Following a late desperation heave from the Cyclones, that wouldn’t have counted if it had gone in, OSU had reached its fourth straight Sweet 16, upending Iowa State, 78-75, at the University of Dayton Arena Sunday afternoon. Craft, who scored 18 total points, received a hug from each of his teammates. The fans in attendance – most of whom were Buckeyes fans – cheered and jumped in jubilation. In a West Region where the No. 1, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 seeds had already been eliminated, OSU remained alive in its hunt for a second consecutive Final Four berth. “I think it’s a great way to win like this. Every game can’t be a blowout. The fact that we won this game gives us a lot of momentum headed to LA,” said sophomore guard Shannon Scott. Waiting for the Buckeyes at the Staples Center in Los Angeles is No. 6 seed Arizona, a squad Matta called “loaded,” and “the best team on the West Coast.” For long stretches of the game Sunday, though, OSU’s spot in the West Region’s semi-finals was in serious doubt. The Cyclones jumped out to an early 7-2 lead, making the Buckeyes look flustered and nervous. OSU settled for contested jumpers on the offensive end and gave up open shots on defense. “Settle down,” Craft barked to his teammates. OSU fought back, going on a 12-2 run sparked by Scott’s play off the bench. The sophomore guard, however, was called for a technical foul after an and-one layup in transition when he tossed the basketball at an Iowa State defender. The Buckeyes’ momentum halted, and OSU scraped into halftime with a 38-36 lead. Out of the break, the Buckeyes looked like they had taken control of the contest. Sophomore forward LaQuinton Ross had a 10-point stretch midway through the final half, pushing OSU to a 69-56 lead with 6:04 remaining. “I think coming off the bench I have an advantage because I get to watch the pace of the game,” Ross said, who totaled 17 points. “I was able to come in the game and set a few screens for Aaron and get open.” Iowa State then rattled off 13 straight points and took the lead on a 3-pointer from the right corner by senior guard Tyrus McGee with 3:24 left. “Their coach had a great game plan with us, pinning us down with their bigs against the basket and getting their guards out,” Scott said. The Cyclones, who had four players in double figures, made 12 3-pointers on the day, including five from redshirt senior guard Korie Lucious, a transfer from Michigan State. “I think they’re probably the best 3-point shooting team we’ve ever played against,” Scott said. While the Buckeyes looked like they were wavering during Iowa State’s second-half run, the players insist they were not. One aspect of the game they did falter in, admittedly, was toughness. Iowa State out-rebounded OSU, 36-22, repeatedly getting second chance opportunities at the offensive end. “For a little segment there, they were the tougher team,” Smith said. OSU and Iowa State traded free throws and baskets in the game’s final minutes. Craft, the game’s hero, was at times the scapegoat for a potential loss, as he missed two critical free throws down the stretch. “I was just trying to stay focused and poised. I did some things down the stretch I normally don’t do,” Craft said. With 58 seconds left and the ball in the hands of Iowa State and the game tied, 75-75, Thomas did something he normally doesn’t do, too. This rare occurrence, however, benefited the Buckeyes, as the junior forward forced a Cyclones turnover, giving OSU the ball back. “People always talk about my defense, questioning it, but it was a great defensive stop,” Thomas said, who led OSU with 22 points. I was on (Niang), and they were running that play all game and they scored four points off of it. So I was like, I know they’re going to run this play, and they ran it. I saw a guy run up and I just went over there and got the ball and got the steal.” Craft got the ball and missed a jumper from the right wing, but Iowa State tipped the ball out of bounds. Following a timeout from Matta, Craft, with the confidence of his teammates, knocked down the game-winning shot. “As long as it wasn’t him on the free throw line at that point, I was like, ‘Man, he’s going to make that shot,’” Smith said with a smile. “Big-time players step up and make plays at the end of the game.” Craft’s reaction to the made bucket surprised one of his teammates. “When we made the shot, he didn’t even get excited. He was just like, ‘Play D! Play D!’” Thomas said. “That’s the thing about Craft, we love him, he works on and off the court, and you need a guy like that on your side.” OSU and Arizona will play Thursday at the Staples Center in Los Angeles with a spot in the Elite Eight on the line. read more

Womens Hockey No 5 Ohio State records first loss of season against

Ohio State then-freshman forward Emma Maltais (17) heads back out on the ice to start the second period of the game against Minnesota on Jan. 19. Ohio State won 3-2. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignNo. 5 Ohio State (3-1) lost its first game of the season in the second game of the weekend series against No. 8 Colgate (2-2) by a score of 5-2.Ohio State head coach Nadine Muzerall said she saw a different team than the one that defeated the Raiders last night.“You don’t know why a team can play so dominant yesterday and the first 20 minutes of the first period and then disappear,” Muzerall said. “Against a good team like Colgate, they are going keep coming back at you, so you can’t wait until the third to try and win the hockey game.”Ohio State struck first less than eight minutes into the first period off a strike by sophomore forward Liz Scheppers to give the Buckeyes a 1-0 lead. Senior forward Madison Field and redshirt junior defenseman Jincy Dunne recorded assists on the goal. This assist was Dunne’s third on the season in only four games. Still early in the game, the Buckeyes extended their lead off a goal less than three minutes later when sophomore forward Tatum Skaggs scored her fourth goal of the season in as many games to make the score 2-0. Sophomore forward Emma Maltais received an assist on the play. However, momentum quickly shifted to Colgate as the game moved into the second period.Colgate struck back just 36 seconds into the second period to close the gap to 2-1 when freshman Nemo Neubauerova knocked a shot by freshman goaltender Andrea Braendli with an assist by senior defenseman Olivia Zafuto. Taking advantage of a power play, Colgate tied the game up at two all 5:10 into the second period off a power play goal by freshman forward Delani MacKay with assists by sophomore forward Malia Schneider and senior forward Jesse Eldridge.The domination of the second period by Colgate continued as a goal by senior forward Shae Labbe 14:59 into the second period gave Colgate the lead for the first time, 3-2. Senior forward Bailey Larson got an assist for the play. “It was unfortunate that we gave up in the second, which dominantly, we don’t,” Muzerall said. “We usually dominate the second period, so when we had such a great first period, I was very excited for the second knowing that we usually are in control of it, but Colgate came to win, and Saturday games are always tougher.”Throughout the entirety of the second period, Ohio State was held to just four shots on goal to Colgate’s 14. The Buckeyes outshot Colgate 19-8 in the first period. “I think our first period was great, but then Colgate came out flying in the second period,” Dunne said. “You got to give them credit, they are a national championship contender. They don’t quit, and they don’t give up. I think we were a little on our heels and they took advantage of that.”The Buckeyes continued to lose momentum, as with just 2:10 left in the third period, sophomore forward Coralie Larose added an insurance goal for Colgate to extend their lead to 4-2, marking the fourth goal that Braendli gave up. Larose was assisted by senior forward Bailey Larson and sophomore defenseman Shelby Wood.In Braendli’s first start of her collegiate career, she recorded 32 saves and gave up four goals. “If you look on the scoreboard, that doesn’t tell you everything if you watch the hockey game,” Muzerall said. “She couldn’t see two of the goals. We had way too much traffic and if we’re going to do that, we have to block it. The other two, you have to give Colgate credit. They scored four goals on us this weekend with that top shelf goal shot. Her angling was pretty good on both of them, they were just good shots.” Just over a minute later, senior forward Shae Labbe scored her second goal of the game with an empty net goal to make the score 5-2 and end all chances of an Ohio State comeback. “I don’t think you ever put yourself in a good position when you have to play desperate,” Dunne said. “We were given chances and we just got to capitalize. I think it’s opportunity for us to learn how to play when we’re down, and when we do need an extra goal, what do we need to do to get that.” read more

Emery praises Arsenal teenage star Bukayo Saka

first_imgArsenal manager Unai Emery was full of praise for Bukayo Saka’s “big personality” after their 1-0 Europa League win against Qarabag FKThe 17-year-old winger made his full debut for the Arsenal senior team on Thursday night and impressed greatly in the second-half at the Emirates Stadium.In fact, Saka nearly capped off a superb performance by becoming the club’s youngest goalscorer in Europe after shooting the ball into Qarabag goalkeeper Vagner’s face in the dying moments.“Every young player, we have the responsibility to give them chances, first to train with us and to be demanding with their performances,” said Emery on Arsenal.com.“We give them these chances in the games like today, when we can do that. They show us in every match positive things.“Today Saka also played with a good performance, with a very big personality and we were speaking at half-time.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“His personality is very important for us to continue trying to go 1v1 and break lines with his quality.“He played with a very big personality and sometimes with a very good performance.“It’s very important for his confidence and for us also, because we can look at this player and see quality to help us.”Alexandre Lacazette scored the only goal of the game as Arsenal finished as Group E winners with 16 points from six games.The Gunners will next take a trip to St Mary’s to face Southampton in the Premier League on Sunday.last_img read more

David Wagner admits Huddersfield have problems

first_imgHuddersfield Town manager David Wagner admits the club has problems both in defense and in attack following their shock FA Cup exit at the hands of Bristol City.The former Borussia Dortmund youth coach admits he faces a tough task of raising the morale of his players after their 1-0 loss to Bristol on Saturday.The Terriers, who are bottom of the Premier League, suffered more misery against th Championship club with Josh Brownhill’s 72nd-minute strike proving the difference between both clubs.“We have lost the last nine games in a row and seven of them have been by one goal,” said Wagner, according to Yorkshire Post.“It’s tough to pick the players up and it’s the same for everyone at the football club.Danny CowleyCowley explains why he changed his mind about Huddersfield Manuel R. Medina – September 9, 2019 Last week Danny Cowley rejected the chance to coach Huddersfield Town in the English Championship, but today he accepted saying it was a good opportunity.“We are in a difficult period and I didn’t see it coming, but we have to get through it.”Asked if he felt under pressure, Wagner replied:“To be honest, I’m not the right person to get asked this question, which is why I can’t answer it.”“The fact is the responsibility is mine for what has happened at the football club in the last three-and-a-half years, and that includes what’s happening at the moment.”last_img read more

Former Miramarbased Marine found not guilty of murder in DUI crash that

first_img January 22, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Jason Riley King KUSI Newsroom, FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — A former Miramar-based Marine who drove drunk and caused a head-on freeway crash that killed two UCSD medical students was acquitted of murder Monday but convicted of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated and DUI.Jason Riley King, 24, faces a maximum of 17 years and four months in prison when he is sentenced April 6 for the May 16, 2015, deaths of 23-year-old Madison Cornwell and 24-year-old Anne Li Baldock. Three others in Cornwell’s car were seriously injured.“This was a case that was 100 percent preventable,” Deputy District Attorney Cally Bright said after the verdicts. “We lost two women who were in med school — were very bright lights — (and) three others were badly injured. The impact of one person’s decisions to decide to drink and drive — drink in excess and drive — basically changed the lives of five separate families, as well as the defendant’s own family.”King’s attorney, Rich Hutton, said the jury got it right by acquitting the defendant of murder.During the trial, Hutton conceded that King caused the wrong-way accident that killed the victims and injured their friends, leaving one in a coma for some time after the accident. Another victim is struggling to resume his studies in medical school. But he argued that his client was guilty of gross vehicular manslaughter and DUI, not murder.“The whole issue in this case was, was it a murder or not?” Hutton said. “We firmly believed it never was, and that’s what the jury determined today.”Hutton told jurors that what they learned about drinking and driving during the two weeks of trial was much more than King learned from the military.In her closing argument, Bright said King was warned not to drink and drive but chose to do it anyway, acting with a conscious disregard for human life.After getting kicked out of a country western bar, King told a female Marine friend who asked for his keys, “I got myself here, I’ll get myself home,” Bright told the jury.Eight days before the fatal crash, a police officer at an on-base “stand-down” told King and hundreds of other Marines that if they drank and drove and hurt or killed someone, they could go to jail, the prosecutor said.Asked by CHP officers why he drank and got behind the wheel, King “remembered people telling him not to drive” and did it “because I was ignorant,” Bright told the jury.The victims had just left a party in Hillcrest to celebrate the completion of their second year in medical school when Cornwell’s Prius was hit head-on by King’s raised Ford F350 truck about 1:30 a.m. on northbound state Route 163 near Interstate 8.An expert testified that King’s blood-alcohol content was between .15 and .20 percent at the time of driving, according to the prosecutor. Posted: January 22, 2018 Former Miramar-based Marine found not guilty of murder in DUI crash that killed two UCSD medical students KUSI Newsroom Updated: 4:02 PMlast_img read more

Fastspreading pig Ebola virus in China to upset global meat trade balance

first_img Meet Sierra Leones only female surfer ReutersThe fast-spreading pig virus has infected nearly one million hogs in China, a major producer of pork in the world. The outbreak of the virus will soon see major repercussions on China’s economy and even on global trade. The Pig ‘Ebola’ virus, also known as the African swine fever, was first detected in Cambodia. The virus then spread to China, one of the biggest producers of pork in the world. The virus has infected some 400 million pigs, about half the country’s swine population, according to Bloomberg.With the culling of the infected pigs, the population of swine will effectively go down, thus creating dependency on other meat. Australia, which is a major beef provider, could increase the rates of the meat, starting a domino effect in the markets across the world.In addition to this, the infected meat transported from Japan to Australia was detected at airports, leading to the ban of products and causing a bigger crunch for the pig farmers. The report explains that the livelihood of the pig producers has been affected, which in turn makes them increase the rates of the pork produced.The swine fever does not affect humans, but in pigs they can spread like wildfire and kill the animals. The virus causes a hemorrhagic illness in pigs which will kill them soon, not unlike the effects of the human Ebola virus. The disease can spread through dirt, interaction between the animals and food and water. The Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain assured that the food chain will not be affected since the infected meat has been removed completely. However, it was talking about the outbreak of the virus in Belgium.Reports claim that the virus was introduced in the European Union in 2014 and has been spreading at a speed of 200 kilometres per year, triggering massive losses for the economy. Some of the measures China has taken to stop the spread of the virus include killling one million pigs, banning the movement of healthy hogs outside the infected areas and closure of markets. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:02/7:31Loaded: 0%0:02Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-7:29?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img Closelast_img read more

Over 1750 BNPJamaat men detained in 8 days

first_img`Over 1750 BNP-Jamaat men detained in 8 days`Police in special drives have detained at least 1786 leaders and activists of BNP and Jamaat-e-Islami in different districts across the country in the last eight days, ahead of the verdict in a graft case against Khaleda Zia, reports UNB.As many as 222 more were arrested in seven districts from Tuesday night to Wednesday morning as well.A Dhaka court fixed 8 February to deliver the verdict in the Zia Orphanage Trust graft case against Khaleda, her self-exiled son and BNP senior vice-chairman Tarique Rahman and four others.Speaking to journalists on Tuesday, senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi said 1,300 BNP leaders and activists have been arrested in the last seven days.Dhaka Metropolitan Police (DMP) commissioner Asaduzzaman Miah, however, denied the allegation.”None has been arrested in the name of special drives. Police remain alert to maintain law and order,” Asaduzzaman Miah told Prothom Alo on Tuesday.Security have been beefed up at important places across the country, he said.Police have also started frisking people at the entry points of the capital, at the railway stations, bus terminals and waterways as well.When asked about such steps, home minister Asaduzzaman Khan said the law enforcement had been trying to make sure nobody could create an untoward situation.last_img

France defends Iran nuclear deal which Trump calls deeply flawed

first_imgFrench President Emmanuel Macron addresses the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on 19 September. Photo: ReutersFrance made a new plea on Monday for the United States to preserve the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and suggested its provisions expiring after a decade could be strengthened, as U.S. President Donald Trump again criticized the agreement as “deeply flawed.”The pact between Tehran and six world powers, which calls for Iran to curb its nuclear program in return for relief from economic sanctions, is under threat as Trump must decide by Oct. 15 whether to certify Iran is keeping its end of the bargain.If Trump, who as recently as Thursday accused Iran of violating “the spirit” of the deal, chooses not to certify, the pact could unravel, possibly triggering a regional arms race.The Republican president, who has called the agreement struck under his Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama, “the worst deal ever negotiated,” made no secret of his views during a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron.“The president believes that the JCPOA is deeply flawed, and he did share his views with President Macron about how he believes the deal is flawed,” Brian Hook, director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department, told reporters. The pact is formally called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.“The president was very candid with him about what he thinks are the shortcomings. … He told him that it is under review and that they are taking a hard look at the Oct. 15th decision and more broadly how to fix the Iran deal,” Hook said.Hook said the two also discussed an integrated strategy against Iran that would take into account what he described as Iran’s support for terrorism, its ballistic missile program, its destabilization in the Middle East and other aggressions.Asked if he planned to stick with the pact, Trump earlier told reporters as he began a meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday: “You’ll be seeing very soon.”Israeli officials have said changes Israel wants in the JCPOA include lengthening the 10-year freeze on Iran’s nuclear development program or even making that suspension permanent and destroying centrifuges rather than just halting their operation.The deal was negotiated with Iran by the United States, Russia, China, Britain, Germany and France. The six will meet with Iran at the ministerial level on Wednesday.The prospect of Washington reneging on the agreement has worried some of the U.S. allies that helped negotiate it, especially as the world grapples with another nuclear crisis, North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile development.“It is essential to maintain it to avoid proliferation. In this period when we see the risks with North Korea, we must maintain this line,” French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told reporters.“France will try to convince President Trump of the pertinence of this choice (keeping the accord), even if work can be done to complement the accord after 2025,” he said.A senior French official said Trump had not given Macron an indication on whether he had made up his mind during their Monday bilateral.However, the official said Macron had put on the table the prospect of new nuclear negotiations after 2025 during his bilateral with Iranian President Hasan Rouhani and warned him that Tehran should stop provoking the United States with its regional activities.“We feel the post 2025 subject is a red line, but our president put it on the table because it’s a concern and a legitimate request that we must make,” the official said. “2025 will arrive quickly and we have to be ready before Jan 1. 2025, so he asked that we think together how to work on this question.”If Trump does not certify that Iran is complying with the agreement, the U.S. Congress will have 60 days to decide whether to reimpose sanctions waived under the deal.Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warned on Sunday that Tehran would react strongly to any “wrong move” by Washington on the nuclear deal.DIVIDING WORLD POWERSParis took one of the hardest lines against Tehran in the negotiations, but has been quick to restore trade ties and Macron has said repeatedly there is no alternative to the deal.French officials say Iran is respecting the JCPOA and that, were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to say otherwise, a mechanism exists to reimpose sanctions.The IAEA is the body ensuring the accord is carried out, but the United States and Iran quarrelled over how Tehran’s nuclear activities should be policed at an IAEA meeting on Monday after a U.S. call last month for wider inspections.U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson argued on Friday that Washington must consider the full threat it says Iran poses to the Middle East when crafting its new policy toward Tehran.A senior French diplomat underlined that the nuclear deal was achieved in large part because it was not linked to all the other grievances the United States may have had with Iran.With Europeans not on the same page as the Trump administration, Iranian officials say they have an opportunity to divide the P5+1 group that negotiated the deal with Iran.A senior Iranian diplomat and a former nuclear negotiator said he believed the Europeans had no intention of following Trump’s overtly aggressive Iran policy.“They are wise. Look at the region. Crisis everywhere. From Iraq to Lebanon. Iran is a reliable regional partner for Europe, not only a trade partner but a political one as well,” the diplomat said.“European powers have been committed to the deal. The IAEA has repeatedly confirmed Iran’s commitment to the deal. Trump’s insistence on his hostile policy towards Iran will further deepen the gap among the P5+1 countries,” the diplomat said.last_img read more

UPDATE Houston Harris Grant 75 Million to 28 NonProfits Helping Harvey Victims

first_imgAl Ortiz | Houston Public MediaHouston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Ed Emmett announce the recipients of the joint Harvey Relief Fund on October 3rd, 2017.Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Ed Emmett announced Tuesday the first 28 recipients of grants funded through the joint Fund the City and the County created to help Harvey victims.Tony Chase, co-chair of the Fund, says that, so far, they have raised approximately $79 million.The first round of grants amounts to $7.5 million and the chosen non-profits will use the money to provide services such as temporary housing, home repairs and rental assistance, among other things.Chase also says the goal is to have all the monies of the Fund distributed in the next nine to 12 months.The non-profits that received the funds include household names, such as Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston and the Salvation Army, but also groups that work in certain parts of greater Houston, like the Katy Christian Ministries and the Fifth Ward Community Redevelopment Corporation.Mayor Turner emphasized during a press conference to announce the grants that the help isn’t just for people with low income levels.“You may be middle income, OK? But all of your stuff is on the curb and you’ve exhausted your savings and your bank account. Well, you need help too,” Turner noted.The grant contracts specify the selected non-profits must use the funds for programs benefiting Harvey victims within the next 90 days. Listen 00:00 /00:59 X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share last_img read more

Another way for stellarmass black holes to grow larger

first_img , Astrophysical Journal , arXiv A trio of researchers with The University of Hong Kong, Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics in Taiwan and Northwestern University in the U.S., has come up with an alternative theory to explain how some stellar-mass black holes can grow bigger than others. In their paper published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Shu-Xu Yi, K.S. Cheng and Ronald Taam describe their theory and how it might work. Citation: Another way for stellar-mass black holes to grow larger (2018, August 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-stellar-mass-black-holes-larger.html Since the initial detection of gravitational waves three years ago, five more detections have been observed—and five of the total have been traced back to emissions created by two stellar-mass black holes merging. The sixth was attributed to neutron stars merging. As part of their studies of such detections, space researchers have been surprised by the size of the stellar-mass black holes producing the gravity waves—they were bigger than other stellar-mass black holes. Their larger size has thus far been explained by the theory that they grew larger because they began their lives as stars that contained very small amounts of metal—stars with traces of metals would retain most of their mass because they produce weaker solar winds. In this new effort, the researchers suggest another possible way for stellar-mass black holes to grow larger than normal.The new theory starts out by noting that some supermassive black holes at the hearts of galaxies are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. In such galaxies, there are often stars lying just outside the disk—stars that could evolve to become stellar-mass black holes. The researchers suggest that it is possible that sometimes, pairs of these stars wind up in the disk as they evolve into black holes. Such stellar-mass black holes would pull in material from the disk, causing them to grow larger. The researchers note that if such a scenario were to play out, it is also possible that the two merging stars could wind up with a synchronized spin resulting in a stellar-mass black hole that produces more gravity waves than if the spins had not been synchronized, making them easier for researchers to spot. More information: Shu-Xu Yi et al. The Growth of Stellar Mass Black Hole Binaries Trapped in the Accretion Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei, The Astrophysical Journal (2018). DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/aac649 , On Arxiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.07026AbstractAmong the four black hole (BH) binary merger events detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), six progenitor BHs have masses greater than 20 M ⊙. The existence of such massive BHs suggests that extreme metal-poor stars are the progenitors. An alternative possibility, that a pair of stellar mass BHs each with mass ~7 M ⊙ increases to >20 M ⊙ via accretion from a disk surrounding a supermassive BH (SMBH) in an active galactic nucleus (AGN), is considered. The growth of mass of the binary and the transfer of orbital angular momentum to the disk accelerates the merger. Based on the recent numerical work of Tang et al., it is found that, in the disk of a low-mass AGN with mass ~106 M ⊙ and Eddington ratio >0.01, the mass of an individual BH in the binary can grow to >20 M ⊙ before coalescence, provided that accretion takes place at a rate more than 10 times the Eddington value. This mechanism predicts a new class of gravitational wave (GW) sources involving the merger of two extreme Kerr black holes associated with AGNs and a possible electromagnetic wave counterpart. Journal information: Astrophysical Journal Letterscenter_img Explore further Image: Black hole bounty captured in the center of the Milky Way © 2018 Phys.org This artist’s impression shows a binary system containing a stellar-mass black hole called IGR J17091-3624, or IGR J17091 for short. The strong gravity of the black hole, on the left, is pulling gas away from a companion star on the right. This gas forms a disk of hot gas around the black hole, and the wind is driven off this disk. Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Reworking informal businesses

first_imgAirbnb—the room rental company that does not own any rooms—has just sued the city of New York. Why? This is because the city has introduced a bill to penalise anyone who rents out their apartment for less than 30 days. This would effectively kill Airbnb’s business, which makes every household owner a potential hotelier. Airbnb provides an online listing system—anyone who owns a house, or many properties can rent out space. The business cuts into the profits of conventional hotels who have to buy land, build rooms and take care of the establishment. In Airbnb’s case, the costs are low and distributed. More importantly, thousands, even millions, of rooms suddenly become available, which eat into the market of house rentals or hotels. Airbnb is, not surprisingly, hitting old business, which also is hitting back.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIt is also difficult to regulate. Just think. How do city governments control millions of property owners who have become instant hoteliers? Airbnb argues that its reputational system, where owners and guests rate each other, regulates the informal market. Governments disagree. Airbnb is fighting similar battles in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin and even in its hometown of San Francisco, and the list is growing. Uber—the taxi service that does not own any cars—has similar battles on hand. Uber, and others like it, have turned every car owner into a potential service provider. All that Uber does is to aggregate these millions of car owners who have overnight become taxi drivers. This is why it can reduce costs and work the market—drastically undercut the market price and drive regular taxi service into the red. All this without owning a single car.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveUber and its variants are facing tremendous hostility from the old business. I saw this at close hand when the Supreme Court of India directed that all taxis, including those run by aggregators like Uber or Ola, should convert to CNG. This was done to reduce Delhi’s runaway air pollution. But the result of this seemingly simple order was out and out war. All taxi owners—from the black and yellow, radio taxi, to the tourist taxi and all India tourist taxi—converged at the Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority (I am a member of it), which is required to oversee the implementation of the Supreme Court’s direction. They had only one demand: stop Uber and Ola.  Our objective was different—to regulate the fuel used by taxis and not to stop their operations. But regulation is a challenge. In the very first meeting, the police informed us that they are helpless. They could not identify the taxi—every car had become a taxi. Uber and Ola told us that they were not taxi operators—only aggregators. In fact, their companies are registered as information technology providers. They were also not responsible for anything—customers hired cars using their platform and rated the service provided by drivers. The Delhi government had issued guidelines, which would curtail the operations of such aggregators, but Uber challenged this in the court. Finally, after weeks of protracted discussions, and often violent disagreements, it was agreed that all taxis, including those listed with the aggregators, would run on CNG. But all other issues, including the contentious issue of surge pricing, remained unresolved. Governments in India and abroad are battling with taxi operators and technology companies to formulate these rules. But why am I writing this now? The fact is Airbnb and Uber are part of the inevitable change in our future. The reason is that the modern world has formalised its economy to the point that it has become unviable. The brick-and-mortar world requires massive infrastructure, and this then requires regulations to ensure that all this operates within rules. The cost of regulations is also high and adds to the cost of running the economy. In my view, Uber and Airbnb are undercutting this world—by making the best use of the individual’s assets. In both cases, they are optimising existing resources—the cars and houses people own—to make more money and share the profits. But most importantly, these businesses are working the informal space. They are doing this to reduce costs and to expand opportunity. This is where we need to think further of what our world is about. In countries like India, informal business is the existing order of the day. Everything—from collecting sewage from homes, recycling garbage to providing transport in our cities—is managed by millions of myriad informal businesses. But we do not consider it part of our future. Worse, it defies regulation as we know it today. So, it must go. But given that the formal economy comes with costs, we cannot replace this informal and thriving business. But to kill it we neglect it; make it illegal, and altogether despise it. But still, it stays. We just can’t make it work. So, is it time we thought of a different business future? Let’s discuss this again.(The writer is Editor of Down To Earth magazine. Views expressed are strictly personal.)last_img read more

Ideal platform for carpet weavers

first_imgTo promote the cultural heritage and weaving skills of Indian hand-made carpets and other floor coverings amongst the visiting overseas carpet buyers, the Carpet Export Promotion Council is organising its 34th India Carpet Expo (13th in Varanasi) at the Sampurnanand Sanskrit University Ground, Varanasi, under the aegis of Government of India. The event which will commence from October 10 and will last till October 13, is an ideal platform for International carpet buyers, buying houses, buying agents, architects and Indian carpet manufacturers and exporters, to meet and establish long term business relationship. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfBeing one of the largest handmade carpet fairs in Asia, the expo offers a unique platform for the buyers to source the best handmade carpets, rugs and other floor coverings under one roof. It has become a popular destination worldwide for handmade carpets. India’s unique capability in adapting to any type of design, colour, quality and size as per the specifications of the carpet buyers has made it a household name in International market. The carpet industry uses diverse raw-materials from various ports of India i.e. wool, silk, manmade fibre, jute, cotton and various blends of different yarns. Economists believe that this industry have immense potential for growth, both in production and exports. Also, it is environment friendly and does not use scarce and perishable energy resources. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveOver the years, the India Carpet Expo has established itself as a great sourcing platform for the carpet buyers from all over the globe. The prime objective of the Council in holding the Expo in Varanasi, the major Carpet producing belt, is to provide ‘unique pick and choose’ business opportunity to all overseas carpet buyers. It is the endeavor of the Council to provide exclusive business environment to the carpet importers as well as manufacturers and exporters. The Council has allotted stands to 274 participants in the biggest possible stand area of 6631 sq meter in ICE, during October 2017. The event will be inaugurated on October 10, by Ajay Tamta, Minister of State for Textiles, Government of India, in the august presence of Shantmanu, IAS, Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) and other Senior Government officials from the Central and State Governments.It is expected that around 500 reputed overseas carpet buyers, from almost 58 countries mainly from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Mexico, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Turkey, U.K., USA etc. have registered themselves for attending the Expo. It would be worthwhile to mention that buyers from new countries like Bulgaria, Israel, Mauritius, Taiwan, Vietnam are also attending the mega Expo to do serious business with Indian exporters/manufacturers. This will ultimately benefit over two million weavers/artisans employed in this highly labour intensive rural based cottage industry.Carpet Export Promotion Council (CEPC) is not only inviting and incentivizing the wholesale buyers but is also providing a two-nights complimentary stay in a hotel at Varanasi for attending the India Carpet Expo. Mahavir Pratap Sharma, Chairman, said that this exhibition and buyer-seller meet will be taking Indian exports of handmade carpets to greater and newer heights. Siddh Nath Singh, first Vice-Chairman, Umer Hameed, second Vice-Chairman and all Members of COA, CEPC are confident that the Expo will generate good business for the artisans and weavers from around the globe.last_img read more

Acknowledging efforts of Ponty Chadha Foundation

first_imgMata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan, an initiative of The Ponty Chadha Foundation, recently received the ‘National Award for Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan) 2018’ by the Vice-President Venkaiah Naidu. The award was received by Shanam Chadha, Trustee – The Ponty Chadha Foundation at a function organised by Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan) under the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment on the occasion of International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The institution got the award under the category – ‘Best Institution working for Cause of Persons with Disabilities’. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfManpreet Singh Chadha, Founder Member, and Trustee, The Ponty Chadha Foundation said, “It was my father’s vision to create an environment where children with special needs could become socially and economically independent, and today I am proud that his dream project has reached this pinnacle. Working on his philosophy and vision, we strive to work towards creating a better society for the special children. I am thankful for all the support received from the Principal, teachers, parents, and well-wishers who have worked tirelessly towards the betterment of this segment.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveOn the development, Dr Vandana Sharma, Director, and Principal, Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan School said, “It’s a great pleasure for all of us to be acknowledged with this prestigious award. We have been trying very hard to achieve the highest standards of rehabilitation service for the community of differently abled. Now it’s time to celebrate the vision of our founders and take our mission forward with greater motivation. We humbly accept the award with gratitude and a sense of greater responsibility towards empowerment of children and adults with special needs every year.” Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan was founded in 1999 by Gurdeep Singh Chadha (Ponty Chadha) with a mission to educate and prepare special children to live within the community, having achieved three-fold self-dependence – physical, social and financial to the best of their abilities. The school is one of the largest private charitable rehabilitation institutions, which provides free-of-cost service to over 1000 students.last_img read more

Hacking Doomsday Your Cyberattack Survival Checklist

first_img 6 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. On Oct. 21, 2016, the largest distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) in history was launched at around 7 a.m. EDT. It nailed servers belonging to a company called Dyn, an internet performance-management company that directs traffic for major sites.The Dyn attack caused a severe disruption of internet traffic to major sites, including many you may be familiar with, like Amazon, Reddit, Twitter, Tumblr, Verizon, Pinterest, Etsy, Spotify, PayPal, Comcast and even Playstation. The first attack was followed by at least two more.Back in 2012, there was a DDoS attack that took out the websites of JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and other financial companies. In 2007, a DDoS attack literally knocked most of Estonia off the grid.How do these attacks work? The hackers look for a distribution model that can deliver sufficient traffic — in this latest case, a webcam that had sold well and had easily exploitable security. Then they focus on a target. The target here seems to have been companies that act as the internet’s phone book, making sure that traffic requests find the fastest route to any particular destination.If you’re a fan of The Walking Dead, imagine a huge herd of zombies lumbering toward a valley with three fenced communities. While all three are in harm’s way, the one with the weakest fence will be overrun. The other two are more likely to withstand the onslaught.Another way to imagine this scenario is a subway car or bus contaminated with a cold virus. While everyone on board is exposed, not everyone will get sick. The virus goes where it encounters the least amount of resistance, which in this most recent attack happened to be Dyn.We can make this a problem of the past.While our government has disappointed time and again, in particular on matters of cybersecurity, a DDoS solution may possibly be only a rule or two away from becoming reality. That is, of course, if the new administration truly focuses on the issue.In that case Congress will actually agree on the day of the week to discuss the issue, and we can all say adios to the debate about whether the “Great Wall of Mexico” will be the answer to most of our problems.Related: Expert Hacker Shares 3 Ways Small Businesses Can Minimize Cybersecurity Threats The solution may lie in the way many ATMs now handle the new chip technology in credit and debit cards. When you make a request for cash or any other transaction, many machines will not release your card until you grab your cash or completely finish your transaction. This ensures that consumers don’t leave their cards in machines, which of course can create a very real vulnerability.When it comes to the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, the six billion (and geometrically increasing) connected and interconnected devices that surround us in our personal and business lives, the same principle might help. However, it would have to become the law of the land to work — a law that would include authority over trade, i.e., products coming in from overseas.Meanwhile, the “insert and release only when the transaction is completed” ATM process is a security measure designed to better protect your card, your accounts and your financial institution. If all IoT devices required the user to set a long and strong password before the device would function, a major vulnerability available for use by hackers in DDoS attacks would go the way of three-card monte scams.In the meantime, there are a few things you can do to put your organization in the best position to survive a DDoS attack. While these measures are somewhat technical, they are within the skill sets of whomever is in charge of your digital security.1. Identify a DDoS attack early.You can do this with the right Intrusion Detection System (IDS) or a state-of-the art firewall that uses “Stateful Inspection.” These are techniques that can alert you to an attack and allow you to respond before systems fail. Another good move: having a technology professional that is capable of identifying traffic that looks like a DDoS attack and is ready to respond by immediately applying filters to the inbound DDoS traffic.Related: 7 Cybersecurity Layers Every Entrepreneur Needs to Understand 2. Have plenty of bandwidth available.Bandwidth is pretty cheap, and if you are able to over-provision what you need, you can ride out smaller attacks or at least buy some time to react properly to larger attacks.3. Have a rule book.Apply the right technical defenses at your perimeter. For example, you could “rate-limit” your web server so that only so many traffic requests are allowed. This will keep your server from getting swamped. Doubtless, it will still slow down during a DDoS attack, but it won’t fail.There are other things you can do that are beyond a generalist’s knowledge, but are straightforward for a professional who handles the engine room of your online presence. One strategy is to add network rules that dump requests from suspicious places or deny all traffic that doesn’t come from trusted sources.Your IT team may decide it makes sense to time-out suspicious connections, drop malformed packages or set lower flooding thresholds on certain types of traffic. It is crucial to have these rules — however you choose to throttle them — applied to all routers and firewalls and even internal internet-working components to filter out the most common kinds of DDoS-type traffic.4. Get your provider involved.Your service provider will have better tools than anyone else when it comes to locking down the DDoS traffic headed your way. Alert the provider as soon as you see something. The company can even “null route” your address (a network route that goes nowhere) so you will see no DDoS traffic at all while it figures out how to neutralize the attack.5. Outsource your traffic.There are technical firms that specialize in filtering traffic for you in an emergency. When a DDoS attack occurs, all your traffic moves through one of their routers first, and they are very good at blocking all the DDoS traffic that would be coming your way.Related Offer: Experience ESET’s award-winning antivirus software right now with a 30-day free trial.While you cannot prevent someone from launching a DDoS attack against your company, you can be prepared to mitigate its impact. The key thing is to assume that it’s going to happen and be as ready for it as possible. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals December 7, 2016 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more