Children’s Book on Clean Water, Sanitation Set in Liberia

first_img– Advertisement – Liberian-American writer/blogger Chantal Victoria has released her first children’s book, Janjay, set in Liberia.The plot of the book centers around 8-year-old Janjay, a smart, curious, energetic girl who one day neglects her responsibility of collecting clean water for her family to join a friend for an afternoon adventure.According to a press release, the story is packed with humor and local language dialogue to capture the essence of Liberian culture.Children everywhere can enjoy the tale because of relatable characters, relationships, and experiences. There is a strong message on the global issue of access to clean water that resonates with millions of girls around the world.The book is available on May 24 in paperback, eBook, and audiobook versions everywhere books are sold including on the author’s site (www.chantalvictoria.com/books), Amazon, Barnes & Noble, audible, and iBooks.About Chantal VictoriaChantal Victoria (Chantal Victoria Kyei, nee Bright) is a first generation Liberian-American. Due to the civil wars in Liberia, her family sought refuge in the United States where she grew up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She holds a Master’s with a concentration in Environmental Management from the University of Pennsylvania and a Bachelor of Arts in English and Political Science.She resides in London, England with her husband.For more information about Janjay, please visit www.chantalvictoria.com or contact by email at chantal@chantalvictoria.comShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

DNCC introduces City Digital Centre at 30 wards

first_img.The Dhaka North City Corporation (DNCC) has set up City Digital Centre at 30 wards out of 36 aimed at reaching services using Information Communication Technology (ICT) to every doorstep.“We have already installed City Digital Centre at 30 wards out of 36 under the DNCC and the centres have been working relentlessly to ensure providing of information and services to the city dwellers to implement the vision of making Digital Bangladesh,” DNCC ICT consultant Asif Rahman Shaikat told BSS on Monday.”The city digital centres have been installing under the Access to Information (a2i) project of the prime ministers’ office with a view to further development of ICT sector and reaching services to every doorstep,” he said.Asif also said that these digital centres will soon be set up at six other wards.According to him, a total of 72 people, two each in 36 wards, have already been giving training to build up them as entrepreneurs and help them becoming self reliant with working in the digital centres. DNCC public relations officer ASM Mamun  informed that two desk top computers, two printers, one photocopy machine, one scanner, two pen drives of 16 GB, one webcam, one file cabinet, two computer tables and eight chairs were given to each of the City Digital Centre.According to him, the digital centres will deliver different services to the people such as land related services, life insurance, information of allowances under the social safety net, citizen certificate, health advise, visa application, internet bruising, video conferencing, mobile banking, computer training, results of public recruitment tests, paying bill of different utility services, online admission to different universities and agriculture information.last_img read more

Soviet power gone Baltic countries historic pagan past reemerges

first_img Share This! Share This! We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts TagsBaltic states Christianity Estonia homepage featured Latvia Lithuania neopaganism Soviet Union Top Story,You may also like Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News Share This! Catholicism As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,SAMMA, Estonia (RNS) — In the middle of a dense forest in northern Estonia, where the closest village has a population of 32, only a wooden sign with the word “HIIS” clumsily daubed in green indicates anything unusual in the vicinity.“Hiis” means “sacred grove” in Estonian. Past another wooden board with a runic symbol carved on it — it is customary to knock on this board — is a green clearing where visitors have tied ribbons around trees and placed eggs at their bases as a gift and left the dark remnants of a fire.“All that is brought there has to be eaten there or burned in the ritual fire,” said 28-year-old Tõnu Rehela, who has been a member of Estonia’s nature-oriented, neopagan Maausk community since he was 16. “Through the fire, the gods eat. Through the holy tree, the gods drink.”The board at the entrance to Tammealuse Hiis, a sacred grove in the forest near Samma, Estonia, on May 13, 2019. RNS photo by Aliide NaylorWhile pagan and folk religions may seem archaic to the wider world, they are thriving across the Baltic states. The Maausk community, along with Estonia’s other prominent neopagan group, the Taaraists, tripled in size from 2001 to 2011, the latest figures available from the national census. Meanwhile, a 2014 study from the University of Tartu indicated that 61% of Estonians believed that neopaganism was the “true” religion of Estonia.There is a similar situation in both Latvia and Lithuania.The increase in popularity is “mainly young people,” said Inija Trinkūnienė, the high priestess known as the “Krive” of Lithuania’s Romuva community.“More and more people are asking for us to (perform) wedding ceremonies. … They want to have their children blessed by the ancient traditions,” she said, adding this is true even of people who aren’t officially in the community. “People more and more are becoming aware of what they really are.”In 2001, only 1,200 people identified as Romuva, but, by 2011, about 5,100 did, according to online Baltic news portal Delfi.While Trinkūnienė performs rituals for births, marriages and deaths, they are still not acknowledged by the government. Official debates over their official recognition started in May 2018.People gather at the Lokstene Shrine, where Latvian neopagans hold ceremonies and annual celebrations, on May 6, 2017, in Pļaviņas Municipality, Latvia. RNS photo by Uģis Nastevičs“Wedding ceremonies are still not recognized by the state, but we are waiting for Parliament to make their final decision,” she said. “According to the law of religions in Lithuania — 25 years (after) our official registration, we can apply for getting a higher status.”Lithuania was the last nation in Europe to officially Christianize (1387), but it took much longer for the religion to take root. Under the Soviet Union, which occupied the Baltics after World War II until 1991, the native religions were suppressed along with nationalist sentiment.The Baltic states, lower right, on the western edge of Russia. Map courtesy of Creative CommonsStill, these religions lingered partly because fostering a connection to the land, old languages, old gods and tradition was a way of preserving a form of national identity and local memory in the face of an occupying power.“It was completely banned,” said Aldis Pūtelis, a researcher at the University of Latvia’s Institute of Literature, Folklore and Art. “It was the reaction to the perceived danger to perceived Latvianness. This whole movement was started as another way of strengthening it, and it was really popular among the exiled Latvians. Its main purpose was to strengthen the feeling of Latvian-ness.”The old religions also offered more than Christianity, according to proponents. “People say they seek such spirituality that is not available in other religions and a way of fostering Latvianness,” said Uģis Nastevičs, a spokesperson for Latvia’s Dievturība. “The community has been gradually growing over the last 10 years. All age groups are represented.”Trinkūnienė said that when her husband celebrated the summer solstice festival in 1967, lighting sacred fires and praying to Lithuanian gods and goddesses, he was soon expelled from university, lost his job and was unable to find regular work until the beginning of the 1990s, when the struggle for independence gained momentum.Meanwhile, both Lithuania’s Romuva and Latvia’s Dievturība communities have thrived among those in exile from the war and Soviet occupation. Today, the Dievturība have a branch in Wisconsin and other places across North America, according to the organization, while the Romuva community is active in Indiana, among other places.Ausma Spalviņa, left, offers puzuri (straw octahedrons that symbolize the Universe) during a ceremony in the Lokstene Shrine on May 6, 2017, in Pļaviņas Municipality, Latvia. RNS photo by Uģis NastevičsThe pagan religions have been spurred especially by a growing awareness of climate change and the rise of conservation movements that tap into a deep local connection to nature and a desire to protect sacred spaces.“In Lithuania there is a strong movement against deforestation,” said Trinkūnienė.Outside Tammealuse Hiis, the sacred grove in the Estonian forest, a sign states that as late as the 1930s people would converge on the area to meet relatives, play music and dance. “The long tradition of get-togethers died during World War II, but the power of the sacred site continued,” wrote local author Ahto Kaasik, a folklore researcher, director of the Center of Natural Sacred Sites at the University of Tartu and key figure in the movement on the sign.Rehela often celebrates Munadepüha, a folk equivalent of Easter, at the grove. During this event his community holds rituals where members strike knives on axes to make bell-like noises, and the ritual leader gives a speech to the old gods and their forefathers.“Sometimes we hear a sign during the rites,” he added. “Once a dog came in and knocked over a milk flask. … Perhaps the gods didn’t want us to drink milk on this day, or they wanted to drink it themselves.” Aliide Naylor,Load Comments,With anti-Semitism on the rise, U.K. begins formal inquiry into Labour Party’s a … Share This! Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Aliide Naylor By: Aliide Naylor Lutheran student pastor deported amid protests Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 By: Aliide Naylor By: Aliide Naylor Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email last_img read more

Investors are Pouring Cash Into AI Startups Focused on Health Care

first_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. A recent report from CB Insights found that healthcare Artificial Intelligence startups have raised $4.3 billion across 576 funding rounds in the last five years – more than any other sector. Investment flowing into building AI that works with people to tackle healthcare issues will continue globally. Meanwhile, finding sustainable answers to tragic conditions like Alzheimer’s Disease will require accurately kept health records to advance progress — and take the willing participation of people whose lives are fatally impacted by the disease. The party ultimately responsible for finding the answer to Alzheimer’s might not be human — or at least, the effort to rid the world of the disease may not be fully a human one.Artificial Intelligence presents the medical field with new opportunities to use learnings from existing and newly created data sets to solve complex human issues over the next few years. The technology’s complementary utility for health science and medical research offers new opportunities to unearth minuscule clues from individual patient histories that lead to global breakthroughs. AI has the potential to serve as a natural partner for medical researchers and professionals who spend careers combing through records to uncover trends and anomalies.Related: AI Is Transforming Healthcare as We Know It. Here’s a Look at the Future — and the Opportunities for Entrepreneurs.AI helps people find medical answers.As an industry, health science is beginning to realize the full benefits of using precision medicine to treat disease. Early success stories include making progress in cancer detection and uncovering potential health indicators from medical histories and DNA analysis. The underlying idea of using AI for health science, in particular, is to look at people’s specific genetic or molecular profiles and determine what personalized treatment works best on a case-by-case basis.In the coming years, successfully advancing precision health science will depend on collecting and storing data representing diverse patient populations. It will also rely on the health science sector’s ability to develop sophisticated AI and machine learning algorithms that mine massive amounts of data to answer very specific healthcare questions. Questions like: how do we find the indicators hidden in countless health records? Which genetic variants matter? Why does one disease impact a patient and not someone with a similar genetic makeup? AI can serve as as a means to helping the health science sector answer some of these questions, analyze specific factors with precision and bring clarity to patients earlier in the diagnosis discovery process.Related: Wonders Artificial Intelligence is Doing For The Healthcare SectorAI’s real world impact across health sectors.AI’s real world impact on health science has already materialized in the form of new pharmaceutical combinations, more promising hypotheses, improved medical diagnostics, targeted risk factor analysis and reporting that leads to more accuracy in personalized medicine. AI can fully absorb, contextualize and analyze critical healthcare information in the time it takes a human counterpart to read through a few records. The technology is built to mobilize and manage large data sets autonomously. Meanwhile, human counterparts can focus on communicating the benefits of AI findings, proactively using them to address individual medical concerns and offer more personalized patient care.AI can integrate data from multiple sources and determine relevance to specific cases swifter than humans. The technology can analyze data in real-time and produce actionable insights that would take several hours — or years in some cases — for people to complete. When built responsibly using objective data sets and lab-tested technology, AI does not have preconceived notions about the medical records, DNA and RNA analysis and general information it sorts through, eliminating potential biases and erroneous conclusions.AI’s health science success hinges on the availability of human-curated training data sets that allow for performance and bias testing prior to AI entering the market. The opportunity to connect AI and countless data sets presents the greatest opportunity for medical professionals looking toward technology for answers. In practice, AI’s core ability to automate data analysis frees up medical research people to focus on the end result, apply findings to real world medical or pharmaceutical trials, and, ultimately, adapt individual healthcare plans to incorporate new methods.Related: How AI is Making the Impossible Possible in Healthcare SectorLooking ahead to an uncertain future.The biggest challenge for health practitioners turning to AI in 2019 will remain the availability of curated data sets needed to train algorithm-driven technologies destined for disease detection and other crucial medical work. AI must be trustworthy enough to make accurate predictive assessments that dramatically impact patient care and health results in the real world. The process of preparing AI for health will become easier in the near future as the technology advances, regular people become more familiar with AI and its real world applications for disease prevention prove successful.After all, disease prevention is the holy grail. Technologies, like AI, that enable early disease detection and interception will transform patient care wholesale. AI can help medical professionals detect diseases earlier and give people impacted by those diseases a fighting opportunity to overcome them.Undoubtedly, human efforts to rid the world of Alzheimer’s disease, and other deadly illnesses or inherited conditions, will advance with the support of data-driven technologies. Tapping AI for those tasks will allow doctors and medical professionals to focus on providing more precise and empathetic patient care. Researchers can spend time making sense of AI-driven findings in order to bring machine-discovered remedies into a very human reality, like living with Alzheimer’s, that changes lives — and saves them. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. November 7, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals 5 min read Register Now »last_img read more