Dunn Leads Women’s Golf on First Day of the Bradley Spring Break Invite

first_imgThe Bulldogs totaled a team score of 653 (327-326) on the first day of the 54-hole event. Sophomore Grace Dunn is tied for 23rd-place to lead the team with a score of 158 (82-76). Junior Madison Glennie recorded a score of 162 (81-81), while fellow junior Nicole Blanchard carded a 166 (84-82). Freshman Sigurlaug Jonsdottir is a stroke behind Blanchard with a score of 167 (80-87). Aimee Gerschke rounded out the team’s effort with a score of 174 (84-90). Story Links DALLAS, Texas – The Drake University women’s golf team finished the first 36 holes in ninth-place at the Bradley Spring Break Invitational on Monday in Dallas, Texas. The Bulldogs will close out action at the Bradley Spring Break Invitational on Tuesday. Print Friendly Version Freshman Reilly Krohe, who is playing as an individual, posted a score of 188 (93-95). First Day Results last_img read more

Late season rains thwart disaster for many Ohio crop farms in 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Thank God for the rains in August — farmers in Ohio who have not done this yet, should consider doing so promptly. Those incredibly valuable rains in mid- to late-August were the thin thread saving many fields from a total yield disaster.By early August nearly all of Ohio was suffering from varying degrees of hot and dry conditions. On the week ending Aug. 7, the growing degree day accumulation was well ahead of normal for nearly every location in Ohio monitored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, with locations in eastern Ohio leading the charge. New Philadelphia was plus 574 GDDs and Cambridge had a whopping 653 GDDs more than normal. As temperatures soared, rainfall really dropped off. The Aug. 7 NASS report reflected this trend clearly with nearly every Ohio location in a rainfall deficit compared to normal. Sydney was over nine inches of rain behind and Ashtabula was at 9.99 inches below normal, according to NASS.The situation was nearly the complete opposite of the previous year for Mike Heffelfinger in Van Wert County. In the 2015 growing season, by mid-August Heffelfinger’s farm had gotten close to 40 inches of rain. In 2016, he had gotten 2.3 inches inches of rain from the third week of May through mid-August. The conditions on either extreme in the last two years produced dismally similar tough yield situations for the farm.This year, early corn harvest reflected the tough conditions of 2016 for Heffelfinger, though it was not a total disaster.“We are seeing 140-bushel corn. I wouldn’t have guessed that a month or two ago. We are just really getting a good start with corn but in the fields we have harvested, 140 has hit it pretty close,” Heffelfinger said. “That 2.3 inches this summer gave us something. It is not anything to brag about but it is better than anticipated.”The saving grace was the soybean yield on the farm thanks in large part to the 11.5 inches of rain that fell in the area from Aug. 12 through late October.“We got two inches on Oct. 21 and we were back out in the fields four days later. It usually takes longer to get back out on the fields after a rain like that at that time of year. Because of that I think we are still shy on subsoil moisture,” Heffelfinger said. “We could run into some very poor yielding corn yet but we have had some pleasant surprises so far. The soybeans were excellent and corn could be better, but we are not going to complain after the heat and dry weather this summer. I saw a range on the yield monitor from 211 to 67 bushels in one corn field. It is amazing to watch.”It was not even in the areas of the worst stress in the state where dramatic differences in corn yields were evident. By any measure, many parts of Fairfield County were comparatively low stress in 2016 for corn production in Ohio.“We were only probably stressed for two weeks, and some of our varieties handled that little bit of stress better than others,” said Jon Miller, who farms in eastern Fairfield County. “It was not in adjoining fields, but they were close on the same farm, where we had some of our best corn averaging 239 bushels and some of our worst corn averaging in the 180s. The one field had some drainage issues, but it was still a big difference. You are talking about a 40- or 50-bushel difference on the same farm.”A couple of hybrids really stood out for the Millers.“If we would have had the right hybrid on all of our acres we would have probably had at least another 15-bushel average increase over everything. We had another hybrid that didn’t do as well for us last year and we didn’t go gangbusters planting it this year,” Miller said. “The guys that had good luck with it last year planted quite a bit this year and it did really well for them again. There are always subtle differences between hybrids but there were a couple that were pretty major on yield difference.”Even the short stretch of very hot, dry conditions for the Miller farm were enough to take the top end off of what would have otherwise been a bumper crop year for corn in 2016.“A second variety that did really well for us is more of a workhorse variety that you put in your tougher conditions. It handled the stress and tougher conditions this year and out-yielded what is considered a racehorse hybrid, even on the good ground,” Miller said. “You could pay a lot of bills if you had the right varieties planted this year.”Similar yield gaps were not uncommon in corn fields around the state, said Peter Thomison, Ohio State University corn specialist.“These are the types of years that really magnify differences among hybrids. The boring years are the ones you like because we don’t see this as much, but when you have these stressed conditions you really can magnify the variability that exists between hybrids and fields. How much of that difference is due to genetics, maturity or plant architecture? Slight differences in maturity and planting dates can make a big difference,” Thomison said. “It is possible under different growing conditions next year you could see no yield difference between those same hybrids or even a flip-flop because the way the hybrids respond to the conditions.“It was kind of the worst-case scenario this year. It was cold and wet early and then we had a frost in mid-May and had some replanting because of that. Then corn was vulnerable when the heat and dry conditions came along abruptly. I think we had 44 counties that were in moderate drought stress on the Drought Monitor for a week or two this summer. In northern Ohio there were some places looking pretty bad and in the southeast and southwest things were looking pretty good in many areas.”The details of the duration of the hot and dry conditions varied significantly but much-needed relief came statewide with August rains. The timing of these rains allowed them to have variable impacts on Ohio crops, depending on their maturity at the time.“It was remarkable that the crops did as well as they did. When the rainfall came in August, some of the later planted corn actually benefitted from those rains,” Thomison said. “In some cases you could see that it affected ear development. Sometimes it appeared that the lower half of the ear was at the dough stage and the upper half was at the milk stage. You could see different patterns of colors and starch development because that rain in August really saved the upper part of those ears. We could have otherwise had big tip dieback on a lot of these ears. Yields could have been a lot worse.”In some cases, there is speculation that the use of fungicides this year (even with little to no disease pressure in the fields) helped plant health just enough to allow the corn plants to better capitalize on the valuable August rains.“I have heard from some growers and field agronomists about the plant health benefits of fungicides this year. They didn’t have the disease pressure and they are seeing higher yields, but they are also seeing much higher moisture corn,” Thomison said. “Plant health and fungicides are a touchy issue. I have done work with this, along with plant pathologists, and it is frustrating. We have done the work for several years and not seen any benefits. Then, lo and behold, we have a year like this and we see a response. It would be nice if we knew under what conditions it worked. It is like shooting dice. You never know the year you’re going to see the benefits of these fungicides. When corn is $7 or $8 you can put it on as a risk management tool, but when corn is $3.50 it is a different story. The speculation is that the longer you keep that corn green, the more opportunity you have to extend the filling period for corn. If you kept that canopy alive longer this year it may have translated into higher yields with the rains.”Unfortunately, along with salvaging many otherwise disastrous yields, the rains in August brought with them a new set of challenges that would show up in the following weeks as harvest got started. The nearly dead corn plants that found new life were subject to a number of problems due to the unique conditions, including ear molds, sprouting and stalk quality concerns.“We had a whole range of molds. We started off thinking it was Diplodia, but some of the fields I saw had more Gibberella and some fields had Trichoderma. In all of my time here I have never seen Trichoderma as severe as it was this year in some fields.I think the ear rots are widespread around the state but they are also fairly localized,” Thomison said. “These problems have the potential to get much worse as harvest is delayed. In some fields with fairly mild problems, they could be showing more mold as we progress if harvest delays occur. Moldy ear problems just get worse until they are stored below 14%. The longer corn is out there the more it will lodge and deteriorate and contribute to the mold problems. Grain moisture is the biggest issue until it gets below freezing. With the temperature swings we have been seeing this fall we could see mold growth continue.”A number of factors contributed to the fairly widespread issue of ear molds in 2016.“Moldy ear problems were in some cases associated with the earliest planted corn. Often it was in early hybrids with early planting dates. It was hit with high temperatures during pollination and was under stress and then it was a combination of the hybrid susceptibility, maturity, the stress it received, and planting date. That is not black and white, but it is a pattern we have been seeing,” Thomison said. “A lot of the corn in our performance trials was planted after May 23. The earlier planted locations had more mold and it was more prevalent in the early hybrids. The pollination period was just a little earlier — before mid-May — and those earlier planted hybrids were more stressed. We’ve only seen mold present at one out of seven locations in our yield trials so far and lodging has been nearly absent from our fields.”Of course, with ear molds, mycotoxins can be a concern, especially when being fed to livestock.“Some of the corn that has no mold in it still can actually have elevated levels of mycotoxins too, according to OSU plant pathologists. If you are in fields with mold present you certainly want to take a second look at it before feeding,” Thomison said. “Some of the elevators and ethanol plants are looking for this right now in the counties where this has been the biggest problem.”Along with the molds, sprouting corn was more of an issue than normal this year.“We saw much more sprouting than we have in recent years. The fungi that infected the ears actuallyDiplodia. Photo by OSU Extension.stimulate the sprouting in the ear,” he said. “In some cases there were loose husks that allowed rainfall to get in while the ear was still upright and accumulate at the butt of the ear and we saw the sprouting at the butt if the ear. When we had molds at the tip of the ear sometimes we’d see the sprouting at the tip.”Another challenge that surfaced in 2016 corn was the surprising amount of damage from the western bean cutworm in supposedly resistant corn hybrids, particularly in northwest Ohio.“Western bean cutworm issues will be a major consideration because there really are not many hybrids out there with the trait that controls them and OSU entomologists are telling us we may have to consider insecticide applications in some situations to control them,” Thomison said.In terms of soybeans, the August rains made a tremendous difference with many farms statewide seeing some of their best average yields ever. Along with strong yields, though, were green stems and uneven maturation slowing harvest, splitting pods encouraging a faster harvest, and a growing concern about stink bug damage and other insect issues that showed up this year.last_img read more

Check out the Gwynne Conservation Area at FSR

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Look for new features like wildflowers and a healthy streambank in the FSR Gwynne Conservation Area.The nearly 70-acre facility, part of the Farm Science Review’s host site, the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, has two new projects underway — one to diversify its prairie plantings; the other, to protect the banks of Deer Creek, which flows through the grounds.FSR Manager Zachrich said the projects offer two benefits: They improve the Gwynne itself year round. And they demonstrate practices that farmers can take home and use on their own land, too.Asters, milkweeds, blazing stars and coneflowers are some of the many wildflowers being planted in new seed mixes in the Gwynne’s 10-plus acres of prairie.Previously, the Gwynne’s prairie plantings were mostly just two grasses: big bluestem and Indian grass. The new seed mixes, which add wildflowers to the grasses, offer more benefits to pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, and to wildlife.The prairie project also is demonstrating wildflower- and wildlife-friendly management methods — involving disking, burning, removing residue or a combination. Mike Retterer, an Ohio-based biologist with the nonprofit Pheasants Forever, helped develop the strategies.Gwynne visitors can also check out Willow fascines (bundles of live stems that are planted, take root and grip soil) and riprap (large chunks of rock) — two of the tools helping to restore Deer Creek’s stream bank. As a first step, however, members of the Ohio Land Improvement Contractors of America, a longtime FSR partner, will excavate the streambank, reduce its slope and eliminate an unstable undercut.They Gwynne is also the place to catch up with experts about the mysterious beech leaf disease causing striped and curled leaves, weak buds, and sometimes the death of saplings in northeast Ohio; branch-tip damage from cicada outbreaks; powdery mildew on flowering dogwoods; thousand cankers disease in walnuts; the Asian long-horned beetle; and the spotted lantern fly, which hasn’t in fact been spotted in Ohio but is present in eastern Pennsylvania.All the activities in the Gwynne area during the FSR are included free with admission. The activities include dozens of talks, demonstrations and exhibits. Free wagon rides boarding at the FSR’s west end will take you to the Gwynne, the FSR’s harvesting demonstrations, and back to the west end. No stamp or wristband needed.last_img read more

Nagaland suspense ends, 22 file papers

first_imgThe suspense surrounding the Nagaland Assembly election ended seven days after its notification, with 22 candidates filing their nomination papers on Tuesday.The remaining aspirants have until 3 pm on Wednesday to submit their papers.A question mark had hung over the polls after a boycott call by the Core committee of the Naga Tribal Hohos and Civil Organisations, a conglomeration of tribal and civil groups, seeking final settlement of the peace process with extremist outfits. The committee was dissolved Tuesday afternoon, opening the floodgates for the candidates. 58 in NPF listKuzholuzo Nienu of the ruling Naga People’s Front (NPF) was the first to submit his papers for the Phek Assembly seat. Nicky Kire of Nationalist Democratic Progressive Party (NDPP) and N. Jacob Zhimomi of the Bharatiya Janata Party followed for Kohima Town and Ghaspani-I seats.“By the end of the stipulated time 22 nominations were filed. We expect all the other candidates to complete the formality tomorrow,” the State’s Deputy Chief Election Commissioner N. Moa Aier told The Hindu from the State capital Kohima.The NPF has announced the largest number of candidates – 58. The NDPP has named 38, while its ally BJP will be fielding 20.The Congress was the last to come out with its list on Tuesday afternoon. The party has decided to contest 23 seats, most of its candidates being first-timers. The Janata Dal-United (11 candidates) and Nationalist Congress Party (6) had announced their lists late on Monday night. Among those in the fray is former bureaucrat Khekiye K. Sema, whose anti-graft organisation, Against Corruption and Unabated Taxation, had opposed the polls. Mr. Sema will be contesting the Ghaspani-II seat.last_img read more

First words of Joe Cole as Chelsea Academy coach

first_imgThe former Chelsea footballer has returned to his old club as a technical academy coach, working with the future footballers.Former English attacker Joe Cole played with Chelsea from 2003 to 2010 in the English Premier League.He’s now back at the club as their new technical academy coach.And these are his first words on his new role.“I’m very pleased, it’s exciting,” Cole told the club’s official website.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“So much of the world now is very individual and football clubs give people the chance to be part of something.”“I’ve been part of that for a long time, in different capacities, so it’s exciting to be part of something again and I want to help the club get back to the top of world football,” he explained.“I think having had the career I’ve had helps the young players identify with you because you’ve trodden the road they want to go down, so they easily engage with you.”“They want to learn and that’s my advantage, but I’ll have to make sure I’m very clever with what I say to them to get the message across,” he concluded.last_img read more

Blazers Roy to have surgery on both knees

first_imgA visit from LeBron James and Dwyane Wade. A 29-point half from Wesley Matthews. Comeback wins and overtime losses. It’s been anything but stagnant on the Blazers front over the past couple weeks, but one thing has been missing — news on Brandon Roy’s knees. Don’t fret. The wait is over. Blazers general manager, Rich Cho, announced Thursday that the shooting guard will undergo arthroscopic surgery on both of his knees. Team orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Donald Roberts, will perform the procedure next week. There is no timetable for his return. “I’m trying to do the best thing I can to get back on the floor,” said Roy through the release. “We’ve been able to get a number of different opinions and it’s something we’ve decided.” Roy, who has missed 16 games this season including the last 13, has been hampered by knee problems all year and announced last month that he would be sitting out indefinitely.Upon the announcement, Roy asserted that he, doctors and athletic trainers would explore a host of options to determine the best course of action towardlast_img read more

Condé Nast Snatches Time Inc SVP to Head Consumer Marketing

first_img“We want our readers to engage with our brands in a variety of ways, and we feel our success will be based on being able to provide our content seamlessly across every appropriate platform that exists now and in the future,” Sauerberg told FOLIO:. “We want to take that engagement and continue to try to increase it and revalue the consumer proposition. We want to do that with our magazines and our Web sites and our digital applications.”Before taking on the SVP of corporate digital development at Time Inc., Ray served as vice president and general manager at Entertainment Weekly. Prior to that she served as SVP and general manager of Time Inc. Interactive. Not long after promoting its consumer marketing group president to president of the company, Condé Nast has appointed Monica Ray executive vice president of consumer marketing, overseeing consumer sales and marketing for the company’s entire portfolio. Ray’s appointment is effective September 20.Currently, Ray serves as senior vice president of corporate digital development at Time Inc. According to Condé Nast president Robert Sauerberg, Ray’s “extensive experience in the areas of consumer marketing and digital product innovation will be critical as we expand our consumer-focused efforts.”In a recent Q+A with FOLIO:, Sauerberg said that while Condé Nast’s portfolio of 20+ print magazines is still at the company’s core, technology and consumer expectations have “changed dramatically” and one of its big goals is to increase its consumer touch points and to “monetize all of those optimally.”last_img read more

The iPad app making life easier for people in public housing

first_img For the disability community, tech is the great equalizer The app helping the homeless take back control Men won’t talk about mental health and it’s literally killing them Related stories 0 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See It Review • Apple iPad 2018 review: The iPad for everyone Post a comment $249 With every FACS officer responsible for between 350 and 450 properties, the department was previously only visiting 30 percent of its public housing tenants in a given year. After the app was launched across the state in April 2018, the department conducted one third of its yearly visits — more than 20,000 interactions — in just 60 days.Former FACS client services officer Roger Mclean helped develop the app and knows the problem faced by front-line public housing workers too well. For each public housing visit he used to conduct, he says he would spend upwards of three hours printing out forms, rifling through case files and doing dry paperwork. For a person who got into the job to help people, the bulk of his time was spent on data entry. “It was horrible and very time consuming,” he says. “Now, we’re not rushing.”With only an iPad in tow, case workers can now spend time actually speaking to tenants in their homes, where issues are easier to identify and difficult conversations can be conducted in privacy. For elderly residents and people living with a disability the focus on in-home interactions is game-changing.  “Before, we spent 100 percent of our time on 10 percent of our clients,” says Lance Carden, director of customer service and business improvement at FACS.But for Carden, the biggest change has been a shift from putting out fires to actually engaging with people in the community who need it most. “We miss out on early intervention if we’re not visiting everybody. And we’re missing that social and human element.”Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech’s role in providing new kinds of accessibility.The Smartest Stuff: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you, and the things around you, smarter. $329 $249 Share your voice See Itcenter_img See it Apple Amazon Mentioned Above Apple iPad 2018 (space gray, 32GB) Culture See It Best Buy Family and Community Services officer Roger Mclean talks through the Ivy app with Kate McDonnell. Ian Knighton/CNET For millions around the world, public housing offers the promise of a much-needed roof overhead.But the reality of public housing can be grim, and problems that start small can often become bureaucratic nightmares.That might be a case of waiting weeks to get a broken door fixed or having to file repeated complaints about rowdy neighbours. But issues can be left to fester if councils ignore public housing tenants. And in some cases, as the world saw with the massive fire at London’s Grenfell Tower housing complex in 2017, that can have tragic consequences. While governments can be notoriously slow to adapt, one community housing provider is using tech to catch potential problems before they become big issues, making life easier for some of the most vulnerable people in society.  That solution is the Ivy app.Created by the NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) in Australia, this iOS app was developed to cut out the endless paperwork case workers and community housing residents need to complete to get basic things done. It lets case workers fill property condition reports and take photos directly on an iPad, while also accessing family records, past incidents or safety issues and recent rent and water bills. Residents can complete forms and make payments on the spot, without having to visit a FACS office or wait an age on the phone to get connected to a call centre. And it’s all done through an iPad, which holds records of all the properties and families a case worker deals with, letting them map out appointments and access any information with a tap of the screen.  facs-apple-ivy-app-4Enlarge ImageThe Ivy app lets public housing residents pay bills, update records and get immediate referrals for help around their home.  Ian Knighton/CNET A simple tech update might seem like a no-brainer. But for Kate McDonnell, who lives in public housing with her five children in inner-city Sydney, the Ivy app has been a huge help. “Before, paperwork got lost … things were falling by the wayside,” she says. Case workers were “overloaded” with admin, and when she did actually get home visits, it was often a new case worker each time.Now, when she has issues, she doesn’t need to wrangle her two young children to get to a FACS centre while the other kids are in school — everything is done through the iPad. And when her case worker visits her house, “I know who they are.” $249 Tags Apple iPadlast_img read more

No gas price hike in present situation BERC

first_imgNo hike of gas price now: BERC. File PhotoBangladesh Energy Regulatory Commission (BERC) on Tuesday said it scrapped the decision of enhancing gas price ‘considering the overall situation’ in the country.The watchdog body announced its decision at a press conference at the commission office in the capital city, reports UNB.“In the present situation we find no reason to raise the gas price”, said BERC chairman Monwar Islam while briefing newsmen.He, however, did not directly respond to the question that there is a perception the commission this time did not hike gas price because of the advice of the prime minister Sheikh Hasina ahead of the general elections.Monwar said the distribution companies appealed for price hike calculating import of 1000 mmcfd LNG gas. But currently, LNG could only supply 300 mmcfd.Secondly, he said, NBR has given supplementary duty waiver on import of LNG.”That’s why we don’t allow raising gas price”, he said.Other commissioners were also present at the briefing.Commission member Mohammad Abdul Aziz, however, said that the government would have to provide Tk 3000 as subsidy to the distribution companies to cover the loss that they will incur due to the import of LNG.He said the commission would ask to provide Tk 1400 from short support fund.He said the commission will consider price hike when the 1000 mmcfd LNG will be supplied to the national network.Earlier, all the eight state-owned downstream entities in gas sector — six distribution companies, one transmission and an LNG marketing company — had appealed to the BERC seeking an average 75 per cent hike on the existing gas prices for different consumer groups except the household and commercial ones.The upward price revision was sought for industrial consumers, power plants, fertiliser factories, captive power plants, and CNG refuelling stations.The distribution companies are Titas Gas Transmission & Distribution Company Limited (Tatas Gas T&D), Bakhrabad Gas Distribution Company Limited (BGDCL), Jalalabad Gas Transmission and Distribution System Limited, Pashchimanchal Gas Company Limited, Karnaphuli Gas Distribution Company Limited and Sundarbans Gas Company Limited (SGCL).While participating in the hearing, the gas entities argued that as per the government decision they had to submit their respective price hike proposals because of the high import cost of LNG as it will push up their cost substantially.The Petrobangla started supplying the imported LNG to national gas network from 18 August through re-gasification by private sector-operated floating storage and re-gasification unit (FSRU).Officials said currently 300 mmcfd gas is being supplied from LNG and it will go up to 500 mmcfd in a month or two and then 1000 mmcfd gas will be flowed from next year as per a government plan.last_img read more

Govt develops Energy Action Plan to ensure generation of worldclass electricity in

first_imgKolkata: The state Power department has developed a comprehensive ‘Energy Action Plan’ in order to generate world-class electricity in Bengal.The Power department has been exploiting all its resources to ensure that the people here in the state can avail the quality of electricity that is normally found in Western countries. In its attempt to produce best quality power, the state government has focused on the renewable energy sector. A senior official of the department said through the development of an ‘Energy Action Plan’, the department aims to produce the best quality electricity, at par with the Western countries, in the next 2-3 years. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”We are venturing into the unknown areas of renewable energy sources and in the future years, there will be a paradigm shift from conventional energy to renewable energy. We are taking all necessary steps to make the whole process more sustainable. How the grid integration will be done remains a big challenge for us,” a senior official of the Power department said. In the last one year, more than 10 power sub-stations have been constructed across the state to maintain better quality of electricity and also to address the voltage problem that has often been reported from some pockets, the official added. In the solar energy sector, Bengal has already achieved a significant growth through various projects. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedStressing on the generation of hydroelectricity, the Bengal government has taken up a number of new initiatives. Several hydroelectric projects are coming up on Teesta river, namely Teesta I, Teesta II, Teesta V, Teesta Intermediate state and Rammam Stage I in Darjeeling, each having a capacity of 80-84 MW. “The number of hydroelectricity resources is not plenty in Bengal. Despite the challenges, we are trying our best to generate hydroelectricity, which is one of our main focus areas in the state now,” the official said. It may be mentioned here that the Centre, during the Paris Convention in 2015, had vowed to catch up with other developed nations in the field of energy generation and power. The Centre has also made some commitments before the United Nations, saying that it will achieve the target of producing 40 percent of its power through renewable sources by the end of 2030. The overall carbon emission level in the country will also be reduced within the same period. India has so far been successful in generating 20 percent of its total power through renewable sources. The country will achieve the goal if all the states give more emphasis on renewable energy, thereby contributing towards the cause. Bengal is one of the states that has done a great deal of work on building infrastructure in the renewable energy sector. Since the Mamata Banerjee government came to power in the state, there has been a significant infrastructural reform in the energy sector. Power generation from solar energy has been given paramount importance through the launch of the ‘Aloshree’ project, a brainchild of the Chief Minister. To this end, solar panels have been set up on the rooftops of various government buildings, schools, colleges and other offices by the Power department.last_img read more