Cosmology Mavericks Turn On the Red Light

first_imgAccording to the majority of astronomers, redshifts are “cosmological”: that is, they represent the effect on spectral light of the expansion of the universe.  A minority group of astronomers, however, claims otherwise, that at least a component of redshift represents intrinsic motion effects of rapidly moving objects irrespective of cosmic expansion.  For evidence, they point to active galaxies that appear to have quasars with very different redshifts apparently associated with them; their theory is that quasars have been ejected from the galactic nuclei.  These maverick astronomers include Halton Arp, Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge, J.V. Narlikar, M. B. Bell and the late Fred Hoyle.  Some of these have also been vocal critics of the Big Bang theory.    Bell has published a new paper in The Astrophysical Journal1 (Dec. 1) providing more evidence for the ejection theory.  He studied the redshifts that appear to cluster at preferred (“quantized”) distances and examined the “wings” or distributions around the peaks.  If the redshifts were cosmological, one would expect the wings to be symmetrical.  If quasars (also called quasi-stellar objects, or QSOs) were ejected from active galactic nuclei, the average velocity vectors for a sample due to ejection would be spherically symmetric with respect to the host galaxies.  But from our vantage point, the radial components receding from us by the ejection would be additive to the cosmological component along our line of sight.  This should produce a larger wing on the red side of the spectral peak, and that is what Bell claims he has found in two samples, one at large redshift and one at lower redshift.  “These results offer further evidence,” he argues, “in favor of the model proposing that QSOs are ejected from active galaxies.”    Bell does not claim that this overthrows the standard Big Bang model, but says, “inflation may be in trouble if it suggests that all the density structure in the universe (e.g., galaxies and clusters) was preset during the inflationary period.”  He believes, instead, that quasars are smaller objects that were ejected early in the evolution of active galaxies, and represent the seeds of new galaxies in the early universe.  Still, his findings cast doubt on the usual interpretation of redshift, and means that quasars are not the superluminous bodies at vast distances usually assumed, because such beliefs come “entirely from the assumption that their redshifts are cosmological,” he says.    There are still many mysteries out there.  The Hubble Space Telescope just took a picture of a nearby “baby” galaxy (see Astronomy Picture of the Day) that astronomers claim is just now forming stars out of a gas cloud that formed after the big bang, according to New Scientist.  Why this galaxy should wait so long after others have matured is a puzzle.  (The evidence is merely low metallicity in this particular small galaxy; the story is concocted to fit it into the standard model.)  The Hubble press release puzzles over this galaxy assumed to be 500 million years old, nearly yesterday in cosmological terms: “Our Milky Way galaxy by contrast is over 20 times older, or about 12 billion years old, the typical age of galaxies across the universe.”1M.B. Bell, “Distances of Quasars and Quasar-like Galaxies: Further Evidence That Quasi-stellar Objects May Be Ejected from Active Galaxies,” The Astrophysical Journal, 616:738-744, 2004 December 1.The ongoing debate about redshifts has attracted the attention of creationists and other skeptics of Big-Bang-to-man philosophy.  This paper does not call into question any age estimates for the universe, since Bell believes it fits into the age estimates for the standard model, but it reinforces doubts about the interpretation of redshifts.  It also provides some support for the idea that redshifts are quantized, i.e. that they cluster around preferred distances like waves in a pond.  Does this provide support for the idea Earth is located somewhere near the center of the universe?  Will the maverick astronomers succeed in overcoming the dogma of the majority of cosmologists?  Since Bob Berman of Astronomy thinks the majority party is clueless anyway (see 11/06/2004 headline), it seems open season to offer alternatives.  No claims are made here about the validity of this paper other than to give it a hearing for interested researchers.  But please, please, don’t think that willingness to be a maverick justifies emulating the Los Alamos caveman.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

A Tiny Dose of Poison Every Day

first_imgPeople who are negative don’t know they’re negative. They also don’t know how they were infected with cynicism, scarcity, negativity, and other poor and disempowering beliefs. Negativity doesn’t turn on all at once or very quickly. It builds up little by little, transforming those who are infected over time.At the dinner table, someone describes “others” as being responsible for all that is wrong with the world. “Others” are the cause of bad things. The world is split into good ones and bad ones, our side and their side. Soon, that belief, never chosen is a tiny drop of poison that clouds the lens through which the infected sees their world.The television and the internet provide a constant flow of bad news designed to provoke attention and clicks. Stories are sensationalized to provoke feelings, and to split people into “sides.” Those who are provoked spit vitriol at those who see things different, arguing over events, even though they don’t benefit from the event, nor are they harmed. The poison comes in through the eyes and ears, building up over time.At work, those who are infected are subversive, whispering in the ears of those who struggling, absolving them of responsibility for their problems and blaming “them.” The leadership team. The clients. The competitors. The challenges their operations team never seems to outrun.And then there are the complainers who provide a never ending stream of whining and bellyaching. They wish things were different, better even, but they never lift a finger to make anything better. A drip of venom from the tongue unintentionally transferred to those who unknowingly accept something toxic.This poison tastes sweet to those who want desperately to believe that they are not the ones responsible for their results. A tiny does of poison over the course of days, and weeks, and month, and years, and those who allow it to seep in through their ears are fully infected—and most likely, carriers.After all of this poison, is it any wonder that those who have been taken in so much negativity see everything as negative? Is it any wonder they assume bad intentions from anyone and everyone? How could they possibly not blame “others” for their circumstances, for the things that are wrong, for the cause of their suffering?To avoid taking in this poison, you must remain vigilant, recognizing and eliminating the sources. When you encounter the sources in your personal life, you have to protect yourself by working to beat back their infection with your positive, optimistic demeanor and disposition.You do not have to take in a small of dose of poison every day. You can inoculate yourself by taking in so much of what is positive that you build an immunity to that which would harm you. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Taking Notes on What You Read, Listen To, and Watch

first_imgWe all spend a lot more time consuming content. Much of the material is empty calories, taking too much time with too little nutrition. But some of the content is nutrient dense, providing you with ideas and insights that, if executed or used in some way, will help you produce better results. While cotton candy content isn’t worth your time, the real content you consume is worth more of an effort to capture what you learned.How many blog posts or articles have you read that you wished you would have captured the primary idea, insight, data, statistic, or opinion?How many podcasts have you listened to without taking any notes, even though you heard ideas that would be useful to you later?How many YouTube videos have you watched without taking action, only because you were leaning back instead of leaning forward?The smartest people you read, watch and listen to all take notes on the content they consume. If an idea is worthwhile, it is worth capturing. If the content you consume offers nothing worth capturing, then it isn’t worth your time.Here are a few ideas about how to capture meaningful and valuable content:If the concept is potentially useful in the future, take a note and capture a link for future use. It is better to have the idea captured and not ever use it than to need it and not be able to recall the idea, where you found it, or how to get back to it later.Write down your thoughts, ideas, and questions about the notes that you take after you capture them. Your notes are infinitely more valuable if you add context to them in real-time, or when you let them incubate throughout the day and review them later in the evening.I am personally terrible at tagging notes, but every modern capture tool provides the ability to tag notes you take as a way to organize them. The reason tags are so useful is that the notes can have more than one tag, providing your flexibility in finding the idea by the context.I have been alternating between reading real, hardcover books (still my favorite of all mediums) and reading on a Kindle Voyage. More and more, I am highlighting passages, words I need to look up and spend time with, and typing notes on the Kindle (which could use a Bluetooth connection to a keyboard). The ability to export this information is more efficient than writing notes by hand (and when your handwriting is as bad as mine, illegible notes are mostly worthless anyway) even if it is likely less effective for retention and recall. That said, notes taken are better than no notes, and I am writing my thoughts on ideas after taking them, which I hope improves my effectiveness in capturing the ideas in a meaningful way.Treat podcasts like the written word. If the podcast is worth listening to, then take notes, even if it means pausing the podcast and dictating the note and the timestamp so you can go back over it later. YouTube is no different. If it is worth watching, it’s worth capturing anything of value. Save the link, too. Someday you may want to cite it.If an idea is worth your time, take time to capture it. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Twilight Touch Weekend

first_imgEighteen teams will compete across the mixed, women’s and men’s divisions.Some of Canberra’s finest touch players will be on show including Bec Beath, Pippi Langford and Australian representatives, Matt Atkins, Dean Taylor and Josh Wilkinson. Another Australian representative, Jake Evans, will line up for the Hunter Hornets.As part of the weekend, ACT junior teams will participate in a feature match during the break on Saturday night. The Twilight Touch Weekend will tap-off from 2pm on Saturday with the semi-finals and final held on Sunday.last_img read more

One dead 45 injured as bus falls into gorge in HP

first_imgShimla: One person was killed and 45 more injured when a bus they were travelling in fell into a gorge in Kullu district Thursday, police said. The accident took place near Shalang village in Lag Valley of Kullu, they said. Kullu Deputy Commissioner Yunus, Superintendent of Police Shalini Agnihotri and Sub Divisional Magistrate Anurag Chandra Sharma were at the spot of the accident, an official spokesperson said, adding that the injured were undergoing treatment at a regional hospital. The family of the deceased was provided Rs 40,000 as interim relief by the district administration, he added.last_img read more

Transferred police personnel assume duty

first_imgKolkata: In a major reshuffle in the IPS rank, the state government awarded posting to four IPS officers including the then Commissioner of Police(CP) of Kolkata and Bidhannagar who were removed by the Election Commission on Friday late night. Jayanta Kumar Basu, who was serving as Director, Directorate of Economic Offences, was appointed as ADG, Establishment. On Friday, the Election Commission had removed CP Kolkata Anuj Sharma and CP, Bidhannagar, Gyanwant Singh from their respective posts along with two IPS officers holding the post of Superintendent of Police (SP) in Bolpur and Diamond Harbour police district respectively. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaAccording to the order published on Saturday by the state Home & Hill Affairs department, Anuj Sharma has been posted as the Additional Director General (ADG), Operations, whereas Gyanwant has been posted as the Director of the Directorate of Economic Offences in the rank of ADG. Apart from the two top cops, SP Diamond Harbour S Selvamurugan has been transferred to the post of Commandant (CO) of State Armed Police (SAP), 6th Battalion. Avvaru Rabindranath who was posted in Bidhannagar Police has been made SP Birbhum replacing Shyam Singh who has been transferred to CO, SAP 13th Battalion. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayMeanwhile, as per the EC order, Rajesh Kumar took over charge as Kolkata CP and Natarajan Ramesh Babu assumed charge as CP, Bidhannagar on Saturday afternoon. Kumar, after taking over charge, said he would ensure conductance of free and fair elections in the state. “Kolkata Police is a prestigious unit and its system is unquestionable. Several steps have already taken by the Kolkata Police which are very good and effective,” he added.last_img read more

Much at stake

first_imgThe third phase of Lok Sabha elections today will mark polling in 117 constituencies spread across 13 states and two Union Territories. While all constituencies of Kerala, Gujarat, Goa, Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman & Diu will vote in the third phase, some seats from UP, Bihar, West Bengal, Karnataka, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Assam will join the fray with a solitary seat of Anantnag in Jammu & Kashmir witnessing second part of its three-phase voting. Due to security concerns, polling in East Tripura was deferred from the second phase to the third. A number of key constituencies feature in the third phase as stalwarts of the political spectrum fight it off to secure the maximum seats. A comprehensive win for either Congress or BJP in the third phase will be significantly beneficial in the cumulative tally with regional parties hoping to amass a significant share. In Gujarat, as many as 573 candidates are in the fray for 26 Lok Sabha seats. While the state campaigning in BJP’s bastion has been largely around Modi and his second term, making local BJP candidates irrelevant, there is no Modi from Vadodara this time. However, one simply cannot rule out party president Amit Shah making his electoral debut from Gandhinagar replacing senior leader LK Advani. BJP continues to maintain a strong hold on Gujarat’s urban constituencies – Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad, Surat, Vadodara and Rajkot – which means that it should not be much work for Shah. But same may not be the case in the Saurashtra region, North Gujarat and the tribal belt. Adding uncertainty on a certain land for BJP is the outcome of the December 2017 assembly polls where BJP won a closely fought battle by a whisker. Agrarian distress remains the single-largest issue in the state with Modi sure that Gujarat will provide a similar mandate as it did back in 2014 when BJP swept all seats. Kerala remains a battleground mainly between Left Democratic Front and Congress with BJP set to play spoilsport by dividing the vote. Congress and its allies will be hoping to better their 2014 tally with Congress fielding party president Rahul Gandhi from Wayanad. While Thiruvananthapuram rests in the capable hands of Shashi Tharoor, Pathanamthitta may see BJP score some brownie points due to Sabarimala row following its inclusion in their manifesto. But even so, it is likely that BJP draws minimum seats in the southern state while Congress and Left front fight it out for a majority. Goa’s two seats will see a traditional fight between BJP and Congress but it is Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party (MGP) which will be instrumental in deciding whose way Goa goes. While BJP recovers from the setback of Parrikar’s demise, MGP has backed two of Congress’s candidates making it an opposite picture of 2014 when it aided BJP in winning the South Goa seat. It has been touted that livelihoods affected by mining ban will decide the fate of Goan politics. Maharashtra will see some of NCP strongholds voting today with NCP chief Sharad Pawar’s daughter, Supriya Sule contesting from the party’s bastion in Baramati. Comprehensively, Maharashtra, across phases, is set for a BJP-Shiv Sena combine against NCP-Congress one. While Congress-NCP combine has been dominant in the state’s sugar belt, befitting challenge from BJP-Sena might change the narrative being the dominant force in the 2014 elections. Maharashtra faces a visible farmer discontent which may twist the outcome. Karnataka will see allies Congress and The Janata Dal (Secular) (JD-S) up against BJP who has a stronghold in most of the 14 constituencies that will poll today. Uttar Pradesh is set for a massive showdown with both BJP and Congress’s chances being reduced drastically by a strong SP-BSP-RLD, especially with the election being held in the Yadav belt. Samajwadi Party strongholds of Mainpuri, Badaun, and Sambhal will likely see an alliance victory, all the more since Mayawati, Mulayam Singh Yadav, and Akhilesh Yadav’s stage presence has given their alliance the much-needed boost. Mainpuri will be especially challenging for BJP which has never won there. Also Read – A compounding difficultyBJP’s Jaya Prada is contesting against SP’s Azam Khan in Rampur with the latter having served a 72-hour ban for controversial comments on his actor-turned-politician competitor. With mob-lynching and anti-incumbency influencing people’s mandate, BJP’s chances appear slim despite their landslide victory in the assembly polls in 2017. In Chhattisgarh, while BJP is all set to fight the anti-incumbency by removing all of its sitting MPs, it faces stiff competition from Congress owing to their recent victory in assembly polls and subsequent delivery of poll promises. The mood that marked Congress’s return to power after 15 years is likely to be carried over to the Lok Sabha polls. In West Bengal, a four-way competition between TMC, Congress, BJP and CPI will most probably split the results, though Congress and TMC are likely to share the spoils. In an ally-centric battle, Bihar will see BJP allies Janata Dal (United) (JDU) and Lok Janshakti Party (LJP) lock horns with Congress allies Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) and Vikasheel Insaan Party (VIP). Lower Assam’s 4 seats will be eyed by Congress and the All India United Democratic Front (AIUDF) with both seeking favour over their abject objection to BJP’s rigid stance on Citizenship Amendment Bill. In the militancy-hit region of Anantnag, the second part of the three-staged poll will be held with security measures beefed up due to volatile districts – Shopian, Anantnag, Kulgam and Pulwama – in the segment. Phase 3 will be crucial to the grand outcome and mandate will aptly reflect the underlying local issues. What is essential for today’s phase three is a greater voter turnout after Anantnag witnessed a comparatively low turnout with other states doing moderately better. It should not be forgotten than voter turnout can single-handedly change the narrative of mandate and hence it is important that every last citizen comes out to vote.last_img read more

Poll panel censures Sidhu bars him from campaigning for 72 hours

first_imgNew Delhi: The Election Commission on Monday censured Congress leader Navjot Singh Sidhu for his remarks in which he allegedly warned the Muslim community that efforts were on to divide their votes in Bihar, and barred him from campaigning for 72 hours. The ban comes into force from 10 am, Tuesday. The Punjab minister joins leaders such as Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, BSP supremo Mayawati, Union minister Maneka Gandhi and SP leader Azam Khan who faced similar campaign ban recently. “The Commission…strongly condemns the impugned statements made by him during election campaign held at Barsoi and Barari of Katihar District,” the order rapping Sidhu reads. It also “censured” him for the “misconduct” “The Commission, under Article 324 of the Constitution of India and all other powers enabling in this behalf, bars him from holding any public meetings, public processions, public rallies, road shows and interviews, public utterances in media (electronic, print. social media) etc. in connection with ongoing elections for 72 hours from 10am on April 23, 2019,” it said. Addressing an election rally in Katihar on April 16, the cricketer-turned-politician had stoked a controversy by urging Muslim voters of a Lok Sabha constituency in Bihar with sizeable population of the minority community to vote en bloc and defeat Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The comments by the former test cricketer came when he was canvassing in support of veteran Congress leader and former Union minister Tariq Anwar.last_img read more

The Sweet shot Aaron Craft lifts Buckeyes to Sweet 16

DAYTON – In the middle of an arena packed to the rafters with crazed fans standing anxiously, on a court with defenders eying him and teammates yelling for the ball, Aaron Craft remained calm. The score of the third-round NCAA Tournament game between No. 2 seed Ohio State and No. 10 seed Iowa State was tied, 75-75, with the shot clock off and the contest’s final seconds ticking down. Craft dribbled the ball just outside the right wing, with Georges Niang, a freshman forward, isolated on him. “Give me the ball!” shouted junior forward Deshaun Thomas, who clapped twice after screaming at his junior point guard from the top of the key. “I’m open! I’m open!” roared junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr., who stood unguarded in the right corner. Craft waved them off. He had run the play coach Thad Matta drew up in the huddle – a pick-and-roll intended to free Thomas for an open look – but Iowa State doubled the junior forward, meaning a big man was left to defend OSU’s rosy-cheeked floor leader. “He made the right read. (Thomas) was going to have to catch it with his back to the basket. I was fine with it. I’ve said from day one, I’ll live with any decision that kid makes,” Matta said. Craft waited until the game clock reached three, dribbled hard to the 3-point line, rose up, and fired a shot. Swish. Following a late desperation heave from the Cyclones, that wouldn’t have counted if it had gone in, OSU had reached its fourth straight Sweet 16, upending Iowa State, 78-75, at the University of Dayton Arena Sunday afternoon. Craft, who scored 18 total points, received a hug from each of his teammates. The fans in attendance – most of whom were Buckeyes fans – cheered and jumped in jubilation. In a West Region where the No. 1, No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 seeds had already been eliminated, OSU remained alive in its hunt for a second consecutive Final Four berth. “I think it’s a great way to win like this. Every game can’t be a blowout. The fact that we won this game gives us a lot of momentum headed to LA,” said sophomore guard Shannon Scott. Waiting for the Buckeyes at the Staples Center in Los Angeles is No. 6 seed Arizona, a squad Matta called “loaded,” and “the best team on the West Coast.” For long stretches of the game Sunday, though, OSU’s spot in the West Region’s semi-finals was in serious doubt. The Cyclones jumped out to an early 7-2 lead, making the Buckeyes look flustered and nervous. OSU settled for contested jumpers on the offensive end and gave up open shots on defense. “Settle down,” Craft barked to his teammates. OSU fought back, going on a 12-2 run sparked by Scott’s play off the bench. The sophomore guard, however, was called for a technical foul after an and-one layup in transition when he tossed the basketball at an Iowa State defender. The Buckeyes’ momentum halted, and OSU scraped into halftime with a 38-36 lead. Out of the break, the Buckeyes looked like they had taken control of the contest. Sophomore forward LaQuinton Ross had a 10-point stretch midway through the final half, pushing OSU to a 69-56 lead with 6:04 remaining. “I think coming off the bench I have an advantage because I get to watch the pace of the game,” Ross said, who totaled 17 points. “I was able to come in the game and set a few screens for Aaron and get open.” Iowa State then rattled off 13 straight points and took the lead on a 3-pointer from the right corner by senior guard Tyrus McGee with 3:24 left. “Their coach had a great game plan with us, pinning us down with their bigs against the basket and getting their guards out,” Scott said. The Cyclones, who had four players in double figures, made 12 3-pointers on the day, including five from redshirt senior guard Korie Lucious, a transfer from Michigan State. “I think they’re probably the best 3-point shooting team we’ve ever played against,” Scott said. While the Buckeyes looked like they were wavering during Iowa State’s second-half run, the players insist they were not. One aspect of the game they did falter in, admittedly, was toughness. Iowa State out-rebounded OSU, 36-22, repeatedly getting second chance opportunities at the offensive end. “For a little segment there, they were the tougher team,” Smith said. OSU and Iowa State traded free throws and baskets in the game’s final minutes. Craft, the game’s hero, was at times the scapegoat for a potential loss, as he missed two critical free throws down the stretch. “I was just trying to stay focused and poised. I did some things down the stretch I normally don’t do,” Craft said. With 58 seconds left and the ball in the hands of Iowa State and the game tied, 75-75, Thomas did something he normally doesn’t do, too. This rare occurrence, however, benefited the Buckeyes, as the junior forward forced a Cyclones turnover, giving OSU the ball back. “People always talk about my defense, questioning it, but it was a great defensive stop,” Thomas said, who led OSU with 22 points. I was on (Niang), and they were running that play all game and they scored four points off of it. So I was like, I know they’re going to run this play, and they ran it. I saw a guy run up and I just went over there and got the ball and got the steal.” Craft got the ball and missed a jumper from the right wing, but Iowa State tipped the ball out of bounds. Following a timeout from Matta, Craft, with the confidence of his teammates, knocked down the game-winning shot. “As long as it wasn’t him on the free throw line at that point, I was like, ‘Man, he’s going to make that shot,’” Smith said with a smile. “Big-time players step up and make plays at the end of the game.” Craft’s reaction to the made bucket surprised one of his teammates. “When we made the shot, he didn’t even get excited. He was just like, ‘Play D! Play D!’” Thomas said. “That’s the thing about Craft, we love him, he works on and off the court, and you need a guy like that on your side.” OSU and Arizona will play Thursday at the Staples Center in Los Angeles with a spot in the Elite Eight on the line. read more

Magazine Printing Supplier Raises Ink Prices

first_imgThe Flint Group, a printing and packaging supplier, has announced 10- to 12-percent price increases to its publication inks. The price hike is effective June 1.The increases, the company says, are necessary to offset escalating costs of raw materials, energy and freight. “We have taken extraordinary measures to reduce costs within our manufacturing and delivery operations and to ensure a consistent supply of high-quality products to our customers,” said Mike Green, vice president and general manager of Flint Group North America’s Publication Inks Division. “Since October 1, 2007, however, [the division] has received over 100 raw material price increases from our global supply base.”Magazines and catalogues make up the bulk of the company’s heatset products, a Flint Group spokesperson tells FOLIO:. It is not immediately clear how each of the company’s products would be affected by the hikes.In an e-mail to customers, magazine printer Lane Press—a Flint Group client—acknowledged the coming price hike, noting that ink typically makes up less than 5 percent of its overall printing costs. Founded in 2005 and owned both privately and by private equity group CVC Capital Partners, the Flint Group posted $3.1 billion in revenues in 2007.  The company is headquartered in Luxembourg, Germany, but its Publication Inks Division is located in Plymouth, Michigan.last_img read more