10 months agoJuventus move to trump Bayern Munich for Hudson-Odoi

first_imgJuventus move to trump Bayern Munich for Hudson-Odoiby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus have moved to trump Bayern Munich for Chelsea winger Callum Hudson-Odoi.The Mirror says the Italians are also hoping to launch a last-minute raid for Chelsea wonderkid Hudson-Odoi , to try to steal him from under the noses of the German giants.Juventus have held talks with Hudson-Odoi’s representatives, but the 18-year-old Chelsea starlet is believed to favour Bayern amid his contract stand-off at Stamford Bridge. Bayern’s Bundesliga rivals Red Bull Leipzig are also keen.Hudson-Odoi has seen England age-groups star Jadon Sancho’s success since joining Borussia Dortmund from Manchester City in 2017, which has left him believing Bayern and the Bundesliga would be a good switch. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Photo: Pitt’s “Oakland Zoo” Botched The Tyler Roberson Section Of Its Heckling Cheat Sheet

first_imgOakland Zoo messed up the Tyler Roberson section of its heckling cheap sheet.The Petersen Events Center is one of the hardest places to play in college basketball, and Pitt’s student section, the “Oakland Zoo,” is a big reason why. The Zoo is virtually on top of the court, and like many of the nation’s other top student sections, they get very creative with their heckling. Unfortunately, today doesn’t seem to be their day, at least when it comes to the “cheat sheet” for the game against rival Syracuse.The Oakland Zoo’s cheat sheet on the Syracuse players. Names of players’ girlfriends and moms! pic.twitter.com/VMrsBAxdC5— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015Including mothers and girlfriends is a bit questionable, but the Zoo is far from the only student section to do that. However, the whole basis for taunts against starting forward Tyler Roberson is a mess.robersonzooIn its cheat sheet, the @OaklandZoo mocked Tyler Roberson for spelling his name wrong on Twitter. Problem is: the Zoo spelled it Robertson— Syracuse Basketball (@syrbasketball) February 7, 2015When making fun of someone for misspelling his own name, you should probably make sure you have it right first.last_img read more

SMU’s Yanick Moreira Tweets Frustration With Goaltend Call, Calls Out Kevin Durant, Apologizes To Fans

first_imgYanick Moreira called for questionable goaltend.In what was one of the craziest endings we’ve ever seen in an NCAA Tournament game, No. 6 seed SMU lost to No. 11 seed UCLA on a goaltending call. The call was somewhat questionable, but it gave the Bruins a one-point lead, eventually sending them into the Third Round with a 60-59 victory. Following the devastating loss, SMU senior forward Yanick Moreira, the recipient of the goaltending call, took to Twitter to express his frustration. I would like to apologize for all the SMU fans as senior I shouldn’t make those type of mistake.. I’m really sorry— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015“@KDTrey5: Yep that was a goaltend.” You right ref thank you for end my college career pic.twitter.com/nhrrON0DQM— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015These guys don’t deserve it . It really hurts . All those mile run in the summer all those 2 a day to end my college career like this— Yanick Moreira (@Ymoreira35) March 19, 2015Here’s the play. Was it the right call?last_img read more

Rice Football Signed A 7-Year-Old Boy With Leukemia In A Very Special Ceremony

first_imgRice Leukemia SigneeRice Leukemia SigneeThe Rice football program landed a very special recruit on Wednesday. Seven-year-old Ziggy Stoval-Redd, who is battling leukemia, signed with the Owls during a special signing ceremony. Accompanied by his mother and Rice head football coach David Bailiff, Ziggy received a warm round of applause from the Owl team. Here’s the video:Whenever stories like this pop up in the sports world, it always warms the heart a little bit.last_img

Social ABCs program aims to give autistic children their voice researchers

first_imgTORONTO – Alex Munro and his mom Jenn Potenza swoosh down a slide side-by-side, the six-year-old grinning at her with delight and chattering non-stop as the pair dash from one part of the brightly coloured playground to the next.This parent-child interaction may not seem like anything out of the ordinary — but for Potenza, every smile and every word from her son is a treasured gift.Alex has autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and at age three, he didn’t speak and rarely made direct eye contact with his parents, common symptoms of the neurological condition that affects an estimated one in every 68 children.“They told me in the beginning that he may never learn to talk, he may never be able to go to a regular classroom,” Potenza recalls doctors saying after Alex was diagnosed with a relatively severe form of ASD at age two.But thanks to an innovative program being studied at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital in Toronto, Alex has found his voice.Known as the Social ABCs, the program teaches parents strategies to help toddlers with ASD to talk or vocalize in more meaningful ways and to smile more with their caregivers.The 12-week intervention, developed by clinical researchers at Holland Bloorview and IWK Health Centre in Halifax, uses objects that grab a child’s attention and motivates them to verbally interact with their parents.“I remember specifically Alex was motivated by food and snacks like ice cream and cookies,” says Kate Bernardi, a research co-ordinator at Holland Bloorview’s autism research centre and a parent coach for the Social ABCs program.“And so we just started with that at first and we would give Jenn the cookies and let Alex see them and wait for a signal from him that he wanted one,” she says.“And then I would coach Jenn to hold onto those cookies while she was showing them to Alex and model the word ‘cookie’ for him to say, so that he would know what he was supposed to do to get one of those cookies from Mom.“It was mostly getting something he really, really wanted,” Potenza adds, “like a Popsicle or juice or a cookie, and showing him what the expectation was and then just waiting until we got either that eye contact or he had said the words that we were looking for before he got the reward.”It took a little time, with Alex initially making little “cuh” sounds for cookie, but eventually as Potenza practised with her son, he graduated to full words and then to whole sentences.“There was a lot of crying involved, but once he understood ‘OK, I get rewarded after,’ it almost forced him to just say the words to get what he wanted,” says the Toronto mom. “There were little words coming maybe within a week and a half — very small words — but it started happening with consistency.”Potenza will never forget the moment Alex finally spoke.“Hearing his voice for the first time was absolutely phenomenal…. You have this little person you love so much and you don’t get the opportunity to really know what they’re thinking or they can’t tell you anything or express their needs or their wants,” she says, her eyes tearing up at the memory.“When they have no language and you hear it for the first time — whether it be for a cookie or a glass of juice — it doesn’t matter what it is. Just to hear them talk to you about something is probably the best feeling in the world.”Once completely non-verbal, Alex now can’t seem to get the words out fast enough as he discloses how he loves frolicking with his dog Lucky — “He was born on St. Patrick’s Day” — and playing the online game “Minecraft.”“So on ‘Minecraft,’ you build a city and then you can live in any building. I can build roads,” he says with a gap-toothed grin, the result of recently losing his front baby teeth.Potenza and Alex, who enters Grade 2 in September, were part of a recently published study at Holland Bloorview and the IWK Health Centre that enrolled 62 children with ASD, aged 12 to 30 months, and their primary caregivers. Half the families were randomly assigned to immediately receive the Social ABCs, while the other half waited six months to begin the program.“What we found was that for the babies and families who received the Social ABCs initially, if you followed the development over that first six-month period, we saw significant gains in the amount of time the babies spent looking at their primary caregiver … and an increased amount of time that the parents and babies were smiling together,” explains psychologist Dr. Jessica Brian, co-lead of Holland Bloorview’s autism research centre.Researchers also saw increased verbal responses to parental prompts and gains in their functional language, as well as how often they initiated a verbal connection on their own, says Brian, who co-developed the program with Dr. Susan Bryson, an autism researcher at Dalhousie University in Halifax.“So the babies were approaching their parents more and initiating social contact. We’re very excited about the finding of initiating because it’s not something we taught specifically and it’s something we know is often very impaired in children with autism spectrum disorder.”However, babies and toddlers in the delayed-program group made minimal progress, she says.The researchers will soon begin a followup study — taking place in Toronto, Halifax and Edmonton — that will give caregivers training in how to better attract the attention of babies and toddlers with ASD or suspected ASD before starting the standard components of the program.“We’re hoping that boosting that ahead of time will give the children an even bigger response to the Social ABCs,” says Brian.For Potenza, who also has a nine-year-old daughter, the program was a lifeline that means her youngest child’s future will be much brighter than originally predicted.“I will never forget the day he first said, ‘Mom, I love you.’“I just started crying. I said, ‘I love you too,’ and it honestly was one of the best moments of my entire life.”– Follow @SherylUbelacker on Twitter.last_img read more

Rep Cole reports on hydraulic fracturing in Michigan

first_img13Aug Rep. Cole reports on hydraulic fracturing in Michigan Tags: Cole, Fracking, NCSL Categories: Cole News,Featured news,Newscenter_img Michigan lawmaker provides environmental update from NCSL conferenceState Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona, was recently selected by Michigan House Speaker Kevin Cotter, to serve on the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) for the 2015-2016 biennium.Last week at the National Conference of State Legislatures’ (NCSL) annual meeting, a panel consisting of environmentalists and skeptics of the oil industry took place regarding the highly-regulated practice of Hydraulic Fracturing and called for more burdensome regulations to avoid what they describe as a “race to the bottom.”Hydraulic Fracturing, a process that has been safely in use for over 60 years in Michigan without major incident, involves an operator that pumps a mixture of water, sand and a small amount of chemicals into an oil or gas formation deep underground and applies pressure. The pressure fractures rock layers, releasing oil or gas reserves. The sand holds the fractures open to continue allowing the oil or gas to flow into the well. Innovative advancements in technology have led to the consolidation of gas wells onto one small pad site thereby drastically reducing the surface footprint, number of access roads, and pipelines needed to harness the valuable energy resource.Hydraulic fracturing is also referred to as hydrofracking, hydrofracturing, or simply “fracking”.Fracking allows residents to enjoy some of the most cost-effective energy supplies in the country while also decreasing our reliance on coal-burning power plants, many of which will soon be taken offline thanks to the same federal regulations this panel of so-called experts wants to modify.The Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has a sterling record of environmental protection against oil and gas operations, and most of the country consider Michigan’s rules and regulations to be some of the most stringent in the entire nation. “Stronger federal legislation” is simply not needed in Michigan’s case.While Michigan is blessed with vast water resources, we have a responsibility to use them wisely. Michigan’s oil and natural gas producers make conservation a priority. Almost every industry uses water and, like every other industry, our local oil and gas businesses ensure water use is proportionate to the amount readily available, so as to protect the environment and other water needs.An oil or natural gas operator intending to use a large volume of water (defined as 100,000 gallons or more per day over a 30 day period) is required to use the state’s Water Withdrawal Assessment Tool to assure the water withdrawal will be safe. If the tool indicates a potential adverse impact, Michigan regulatory officials conduct a site-specific investigation and can require the operator to obtain water from other sources or to move the proposed water well. Approvals are not given if a proposed withdrawal is determined to negatively affect resources.In fact, the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) of the U.S. federal government—the same federal government these folks would like to see further regulate the industry—recently came to the conclusion that after a four-year study hydraulic fracturing is being carried out safely by industry and regulated by states and isn’t having “widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water.”Finally, there have not ever been reported cases of illness or other such effects of hydraulic fracturing in Michigan. Independent operators and the DEQ maintain the strictest personal and environmental safety on all operations and there has yet to be a report of serious illness on an individual as a result of such activities.Not only does Michigan’s oil and gas industry keep the lights and heat on in our homes and businesses and employ our residents, but in 2016 it also funded more than 50 percent of the Michigan State Parks budget.  Michigan’s oil and gas industry, through both the Natural Resources Trust Fund, which has given away over $1 billion to local communities through grants aimed exclusively at parks and recreation, as well as the Michigan State Parks Endowment Fund truly takes care of the amazing parks and recreation areas around our beautiful state and will continue to do so for many years.#####last_img read more

Scripps Networks Internationals Fine Living Chann

first_imgScripps Networks International’s Fine Living Channel has secured carriage with Telekom Austria-owned Croatian pay TV provider Vipnet.The channel, which features lifestyle gurus, innovative designers, fashion experts and chefs from around the world, will be available via the Vip TV platform and the B.net cable platform.“As Scripps Networks International builds its distribution, we are pleased to add a third lifestyle channel onto the Vipnet platforms with Fine Living. Following the successful launches in Croatia of Food Network and Travel Channel on the platforms last year, we understand what audiences want and know that Scripps’ great range of programming will continue to resonate in the region,” said Jon Sichel, managing director, Scripps Networks, UK & EMEA.“Vipnet offers advanced television services through two brands – Vip TV and B.net. We are delivering a large range of programs and interactive services to customer’s homes every day through four different technologies – cable, IPTV, OTT and satellite. We are very pleased to enlarge our portfolio with this new exclusive, design entertainment TV channel which will surely attract a very large number of viewers in Croatia,” said Adrian Ježina, member of Vipnet’s management board.last_img read more

Western diet may increase the risk of deadly sepsis warn experts

first_imgNapier also predicts that if it is the fats in the diet that are reprogramming the immune system, then these findings might not only apply to the Western diet but other high-fat diets as well.Napier and her team will now investigate whether specific fats in the diet are able to influence the risk of higher sepsis severity. If you could introduce a dietary intervention while they’re in the ICU to decrease their chances of manipulating their immune system in that way, you can somehow influence the outcome.”Brooke Napier, Study Author Napier and her team also identified molecular markers in mice fed the Western diet that could be used as biomarkers for patients who are at high risk of developing severe sepsis.She stated that treatments could be predicted and specifically tailored depending on whether a patient has these certain “cell populations” in their blood. Source:Western diet regulates immune status and the response to LPS-driven sepsis independent of diet-associated microbiome.center_img The mice’s immune system on the Western diet looked and functioned differently […] It looks like the diet is manipulating immune cell function so that you’re more susceptible to sepsis, and then when you get sepsis, you die quicker.”Brooke Napier, Study Author By Lois Zoppi, BAFeb 13 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)New research conducted at Portland State University suggests that the Western diet may increase the risk of severe sepsis and mortality from the infection.hurricanehank | ShutterstockThe Western diet, which is the most prevalent diet in westernized countries, is characterized by the consumption of foods that are low in fiber and high in fat and sugar. It is well documented that this diet pattern can cause significant damage to cardiovascular health, the kidneys, and cause obesity.However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the Western diet can also have detrimental effects on the immune system, which includes increasing the risks of severe sepsis, the 11th most common cause of death worldwide.Sepsis is commonly known as blood poisoning, The illness can occur when the body reacts to an infection too aggressively, attacking its own tissues and organs.The body goes into overdrive and can lead to reactions causing inflammation, clotting, and organ failure. It isn’t fully understood what regulates this serious immunological response, or what influences the outcome and severity of sepsis.In a recent study, Brooke Napier (Portland State University), found that mice who were fed a ‘Western diet’ were more likely to contract sepsis and suffered poorer outcomes, compared to mice that were fed a balanced diet that was rich in fiber.The mice that were fed this high-sugar, high-fat diet presented higher chronic inflammation, increased sepsis-associated immunoparalysis, and altered neutrophil populations in the blood. They also showed an increase in sepsis severity and higher mortality rates than mice fed a standard fiber-rich diet.The increase in sepsis severity and mortality was independent of the diet-associated microbiome, hinting that diet might be “directly regulating the innate immune system”. However, the exact mechanism through which this occurs remains unknown.last_img read more

Paper sensor to speed up sepsis diagnosis wins innovation competition

first_img Provided by Imperial College London This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. SpiraSense, founded by Imperial student George Winfield, is developing the low-cost sensors to speed up the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in hospital patients. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition responsible for 44,000 deaths every year in the UK. It arises when the body overwhelmingly over-reacts in trying to control an infection, injuring its own healthy organs and tissue in the process, and is a particular risk for people already in hospital because of another serious illness.If it is caught early and treated quickly, most people make a full recovery. But without rapid treatment, sepsis can quickly lead to multiple organ failure and death in just a few hours. Low-cost solutionOne of the early symptoms of sepsis is rapid breathing. Currently, breathing rate is measured manually by doctors on observation rounds.Tests show that SpiraSense can monitor respiratory rate continuously, as well as detecting other biomarkers for organ failure using only the patient’s breath—something that would usually require an invasive and intermittent blood test. If adopted, an AI powered app could then alert doctors to possible patient deterioration in real time, allowing for faster diagnosis and treatment. George, who is undertaking an MRes in Medical Device Design & Entrepreneurship at Imperial, said: “The device learns from every breath a patient takes. It would allow doctors to see trends that might not be immediately apparent from manual observations, giving them more information to make an informed decision about patient care.” Their small paper sensors, which are about the size of a postage stamp, are designed to attach to any breathing mask or nasal cannula already used in hospitals, potentially offering a low cost solution. SpiraSense was awarded a £7,000 prize package, including a 12-month membership at the Imperial Incubator and £5,000 to support the business’s growth. George is currently engaged with securing further funding to develop his device ready for clinical testing. Citation: Paper sensor to speed up sepsis diagnosis wins innovation competition (2018, May 31) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-paper-sensor-sepsis-diagnosis-competition.html Boosting growth Delivered in partnership with NatWest, the Innovators’ Programme is the Imperial Incubator’s flagship pre-accelerator programme. It aims to support the development of technology focussed early-stage companies by providing funding, mentoring, access to Imperial’s innovation ecosystem, free space to work, and training in areas such as fundraising, team building, IP, marketing and pitch practice. The programme runs twice a year at the White City Incubator, and is aimed at Imperial alumni, current students, and tech businesses from the local area. George added: “It has been fantastic to work with such a diverse range of people and businesses on this programme. You really learn a lot from other perspectives and approaches. “The mentoring on the programme has been especially valuable. It’s great to be able to bounce ideas around with people who have such great experience and networks.” The programme culminated in a pitching event on the 24 May, where eight participating businesses pitched their ideas to a panel of judges. The panel included Dr. Govind Pindoria—Director of the Venture Support Unit at Imperial Innovations, Rebeca Santamaria-Fernandez—Head of Corporate Partnerships for the Faculty of Engineering at Imperial, Rebecca Wilson—Head of Corporate Partnerships for the Faculty of Natural Sciences atImperial, Chris Tilley – Director of the Investor Club at Coutts Private Banking, and Peter Ryan-Bell—Head of Large Corporate & Sectors UK & Western Europe at RBS. Runners up Rightly, founded by Alexander Arbuthnot and Tom Andrews, took home second prize for their start-up that allows consumers control over how their data is used by companies by automating subject rights requests enabled under DGPR. Local White City resident Sasha Pinnock was awarded third prize for SP Tracked Safety Jackets, a business that creates GPS trackable high-vis jackets. The jackets would allow parents and guardians of small children or carers of vulnerable adults to keep track of where their loved-ones are and monitor their safety Fourth prize went to ifPlus, founded by Imperial College Business School alumnus Tassilo Vogel, a decision-making tool and knowledge sharing platform that would allow users to search for advice for a variety of different situations. Breath test breakthrough for early diagnosis of oesophageal and gastric cancer Credit: Imperial College London A student-founded startup creating paper sensors to monitor breathing rates of hospital patients has won the White City Innovators’ Programme. Explore furtherlast_img read more

In Killer Robots debate Japan shuns fully automated arms

first_img Citation: In ‘Killer Robots’ debate, Japan shuns fully automated arms (2019, March 25) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-killer-robots-debate-japan-shuns.html Nobushige Takamizawa spoke at Monday’s opening of the latest weeklong meeting of government experts in Geneva on the future of “Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems,” also known as “Killer Robots.”Takamizawa’s comments have been widely anticipated in Japan, a country with highly sophisticated technological know-how and concerns about regional security threats—notably North Korea, which in recent years has tested missiles by firing them over Japanese territory.He mentioned “positive effects” of autonomous weapons systems under human oversight, such as saving labor and reducing collateral damage. Opponents of fully automated systems fear that machines could one day conduct wars without human control. Explore further © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Japan’s ambassador to the United Nations-backed Conference on Disarmament says his country has not developed fully autonomous weapons systems and has no plans to do so. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. UN panel agrees to move ahead with debate on ‘killer robots’ (Update)last_img read more

Varanasi Girl alleges discrimination at BHU administration denies

first_img Asian News International VaranasiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 13:05 IST BHU Student Archana Kumari alleges of discrimination by security guard.Photo: ANIA girl from Banaras Hindu University on Friday alleged discrimination by a security guard while trying to use a toilet in one of the colleges in the varsity campus.Archana Kumari told ANI, “I am a second-year student here. I am in charge of the BHU Bahujan help-desk which we place near Mahila Maha Vidyalaya (MMV) for helping students in the admission process. Yesterday when I was trying to get inside MMV to use the toilet, they refused to allow me to enter inside the college. He also misbehaved with me.”She also alleged that misbehaviour by security guards is common at the university and said, “Security guards often misbehave with women in BHU. Today also they have done the same and there anti-women behaviour is intolerable.”One of Archana’s associates, Ravindra Prakash Bharti said, “We put-up help desk at different places in BHU with due permission from the administration. This behaviour by security guard reeks of the social menace of untouchability. We demand the necessary action from authorities.”College administration, however, refuted the allegations and claimed that the girl was only barred from using a toilet meant for men.OP Rai, Chief Proctor, BHU said, “I have received the information about the incident and also sent a concerned official to the spot. After visiting the place of the incident he informed me that the girl was seeking to access a toilet meant for males for which she was prohibited. However, she was allowed to enter the college and use the designated washroom for girls.”The girl had also written a letter to Vice-Chancellor and proctor of the university seeking justice.Also read: BHU student shot dead outside hostel, tension on campusALSO WATCH| VC claims plot to defame BHU: Do you agree?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byIram Ara Ibrahim Varanasi: Girl alleges discrimination at BHU, administration deniesCollege administration, however, refuted the allegations and claimed that the girl was only barred from using a toilet meant for men.advertisement Nextlast_img read more