Adrienne Warren Tapped for Workshop of Tina Turner Bio-Musical

first_img Simply the best! Adrienne Warren, who received a Tony nod this year for Shuffle Along, has been tapped to lead a workshop of a Tina Turner bio-musical, Tina. The legendary singer will attend the December 16 industry event, which will be performed by a cast of 14, the Daily Mail reports. Phyllida Lloyd (Mamma Mia!) will direct the project, which features a book by Olivier winner Katori Hall (The Mountaintop).Turner told the Mail that “one of the most surprising and wonderful discoveries for me in this process has been that my songs tell my story.” Some of her famous numbers include “Proud Mary,” “Nutbush City Limits,” “Private Dancer,” “What’s Love Got To Do With It,” and “Simply The Best.” No word yet on which tunes will make the cut; the musical is aiming to open in London 2018.Born Anna Mae Bullock in 1939 in Nutbush, Turner rose to fame in the 1960s alongside her husband Ike. She later revealed in her autobiography that she had suffered domestic abuse at his hands—they separated in 1976 and divorced two years later. Turner later made a massive comeback in the 1980s. The Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll has sold 180 million records worldwide and been honored with eleven Grammy Awards. Adrienne Warren (Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Adrienne Warren View Comments Star Fileslast_img read more

Subterranean immigrants

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaWhen they do what they do best, they can help farmers raise healthier crops. But at the same time, they could be doing harm. Most of the ones you see are probably aliens. But one thing’s for sure, they’re great fish bait.Earthworms are among the most important animals that live in soils, says Paul Hendrix, a crop and soil sciences and ecology professor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Soil eatersAs earthworms munch through the soil, they aerate it and leave behind fertile droppings. “Soils with a lot of earthworms crawling around are generally considered good for agricultural systems,” Hendrix said.The most familiar earthworms are 8 to 10 inches long. But earthworms aren’t all alike, he said.There are 3,500 earthworm species in the world. North America is home to about 150. Of these, about 45 are exotic, European species introduced on purpose or by accident by colonial settlers. The earthworms probably tagged along in soils used to ballast ships or carry plants.New digsThese subterranean immigrants, much like the immigrants that brought them, found this new world welcoming.It appears, Hendrix said, that the dominant nonnatives have replaced most of the native species in the developed parts of United States. Most earthworms found in lawns, the woods near homes or in fields are exotics.Most native species don’t like the way humans tend to disturb the soils where they live and work. But the exotics don’t mind at all.”These earthworms really thrive in human-modified environments all over the world,” he said.InvadersMost of the European species — again, like the Europeans who brought them — are naturalized citizens by now. But that doesn’t mean they’re safe.Are they doing any unseen harm to the U.S. environment? And, if other foreign species are introduced, could they cause harm in the future?It’s happened in the past. An animal, plant, bug or fungus that’s harmless in its native land can bring disease or other problems to another country. And with the new global economy forcing countries into more direct contact, damaging exotic earthworm invasions are even more likely.For example, scientists believe earthworms can carry foot-and-mouth disease, a devastating livestock disease. And the voracious appetites and burrowing habits of foreign earthworms have thinned forest leaf litter in areas of Minnesota, threatening plants that depend on the leaf litter.The U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is considering guidelines to regulate the introduction of exotic earthworms into the United States.Hendrix is one of a handful of scientists studying the characteristics of exotic earthworms in America, the geographic extent of their invasions, how they do it and what damage or benefit they could provide below- and aboveground.He’s studying earthworms in Florida, North Carolina and Oregon. He published an article about the possible ecological and policy implications of exotic earthworm invasions in the September 2002 issue of “BioScience.”last_img read more

Safe in September

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of GeorgiaTo help celebrate National Food Safety Education Month, the University of Georgia Extension Service and Publix supermarkets are teaming up on three Saturdays in September to help shoppers serve safer food.”Many cases of foodborne illness are caused by improper handling of food between the grocery store and the table,” said Judy Harrison, a UGA Extension Service food safety expert.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate 76 million U.S. cases of foodborne illness each year. Of those, 325,000 are hospitalized, and 5,000 die.The food safety festivals will be at featured Atlanta-area Publix stores Sept. 11, 18 and 25. The program, provided by UGA Extension Service food safety specialists, aims to help prevent foodborne illness by teaching safe handling practices.The activities will include taste testing, quick-and-easy recipe ideas, games and prizes for adults and kids. Local 4-H’ers will offer food-safety demonstrations and advice on safe snacks and lunches.The Georgia 5 A Day Coalition will be promoting healthy eating. This is part of a national (www.5aday.com) nutrition program to get more people to eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day. September is “National 5 A Day Month.”Only one out of five children eats the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, experts say. Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins, minerals, fiber and other substances, they say, that are important for good health.The events start at 10 a.m. and end at 3:30 p.m., with a break from noon to 1:30 p.m., on these dates at these Publix stores: Sept. 11: Rose Creek Shopping Center, 4403 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock; and Towne Lake Center, 1430 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock.Sept. 18: Centre at Woodstock, 12165 Highway 92, Woodstock; and King Plaza, 885 Woodstock Road, Roswell.Sept. 25, the Centre at Panola, 3045 Panola Road, Lithonia; and Flat Shoals Crossing, 3649 Flakes Mill Road, Decatur.last_img read more

Peanut research

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaAt its March board meeting, the Georgia Peanut Commission awarded $1 million to peanut researchers in Georgia, including $959,000 to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The money will provide research for economics, conservation methods, irrigation and water management, peanut breeding for higher yield and improved quality, pests, weed and disease management and allergen-free peanuts. “Peanut growers are pleased to provide this money to support the research and education that has continued to demonstrate a return on our investment,” said Donald Chase, Macon County farmer and GPC research committee chairman.“Georgia Peanut Commission’s support continues to fuel the college’s research for this most important Georgia commodity. And helps us provide the unbiased information Georgia growers need to stay competitive and lead the country in high-quality peanut production,” said J. Scott Angle, UGA CAES dean and director.The money comes from growers, combined with funding from the National Peanut Board. Since 1962, Georgia growers have invested more than $17 million in research with nearly $10 million of that amount coming in the last 12 years. “Past research and technological advancements have been the silver lining that kept us ahead of the curve in maintaining superior quality, a competitive position and increased consumption in the world’s marketplace,” Chase said. “Much technological advancement is on the horizon, and we embrace the future with excitement and confidence.”GPC also presented $101,000 to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service in Tifton, Ga.last_img read more

Cover crops

first_imgTypes of cover crops A soil test from your local, University of Georgia Extension office will accurately determine a cover crop’s need for lime, phosphate and/or potash. If lime, phosphate or potash are needed, apply them in the fall, just prior to preparing the seedbed. Cover crops or green manures, as they are often called, are an economical way to both protect and build the soil. They are also aesthetically pleasing as they provide a nice green color, when most things are drab and brown. When spring arrives, till in the cover crop to help feed the summer garden. If you are growing a legume cover crop, do not add nitrogen fertilizer. Treat the seed with the correct nitrogen-fixing bacteria (known as an inoculant). This inoculant is important to ensure good germination. With fall just around the corner, summer gardens may be looking a little anemic. Many backyard gardeners choose to let their gardens fizzle out slowly, with the first frost putting the final blow to our summer bounty. You may be daydreaming of next year’s spring garden and what you can plant to better your past efforts.Winter cover cropsInstead of letting your summer vegetables die out and leaving the soil exposed, consider planting a winter cover crop. Cover crops are usually a grass or legume, such as clover, planted on the existing garden site to help hold and build the soil. There benefits of growing cover crops include: Reducing erosion. Improving soil structure and reducing surface crusting. Increasing the water-holding capacity of the soil. Reducing winter weed growth. Reducing herbicide injury. Penetrating the hardpan in the winter, which improves soil relations for the next crop. Providing nitrogen, if the cover crop is a legume. The major disadvantage of non-legume cover crops is that they do not fix nitrogen and usually require some nitrogen fertilizer when planted. There are two general types of cover crops – legumes and non-legumes. Legume cover crops, like vetch and clover, add nitrogen to the soil. Non-legume crops, such as wheat and rye, are preferred on erosive soils. It is important to plant cover crops early to establish root growth before cold weather hits. This helps the crop better survive a hard winter. Plant legumes in mid-September to mid-October and plant grasses in early-October to mid-November.Follow soil test recommendations Soil improvement through the use of a cover crop is a long-term investment. Cover crops can and will add organic content to the soil over time. Grass type cover crops should be raked or dragged into a depth of one half inch. Clover type cover crop seed is very tiny and should only be lightly raked to provide good soil contact, but not bury the seed. Non-legume cover crops (rye, ryegrass and wheat) have several advantages. They are less expensive to establish than legume cover crops. They also provide longer and better erosion control because of more winter growth and a fibrous root system. Prepare the seedbed the same way you did for your spring garden. Either remove or till in old crops. Work the soil while it is slightly moist, but not wet. Crimson clover is probably the most commonly used and most desirable of the clovers grown as a cover crop. It matures earlier and produces more nitrogen and dry matter sooner than most other clovers. An excellent crop of crimson clover can produce up to 120 pounds of nitrogen per acre. However, production of 30 to 50 pounds of nitrogen is common.last_img read more

Insulation Benefits

first_imgPeople wear additional clothing in the winter to keep their bodies warm. We insulate ourselves to slow down the transfer of our body heat to the atmosphere. Building insulation does the same thing for our homes. Insulation keeps valuable heat in during the winter season and keeps heat out in the summer. Insulation also helps maintain an indoor climate that is livable without excessive heating and cooling costs.Helps in winter and summerHouse insulation provides resistance to the flow of heat – whether it’s heat escaping from a house in the winter or entering the house in the summer. Fuel savings of around one-third in the winter and summer can be obtained by properly insulating your home.Smaller heating and cooling systems can be installed in an insulated home because less heat is lost in the winter and less heat is gained in the summer. Smaller systems can mean a large savings in the initial equipment investment and reduced utility bills throughout the year.Another benefit to an insulated house is evenly maintained temperatures. Cold floors and chilly drafts are eliminated when insulation is combined with an adequate conditioning system.Reduces condensation, tooCondensation, or sweating, on walls can be reduced to a minimum by the use of insulation and proper ventilation. For complete control of condensation, a moisture barrier on the air-conditioned side of the wall is needed. Insulated walls are much warmer in winter and cooler in summer. Insulation results in a smaller temperature difference between the inside wall surface and the room temperature. The best and least expensive time to insulate is when a home is being built. There is a limit to materials that can be satisfactorily used after construction is completed. For instance, it is impossible to install batt insulation into an existing wall without removing the interior finish material. Blown-in insulation could work if a moisture barrier is provided. However, in most cases, a moisture barrier does not exist. Without some type of moisture barrier, blown-in insulation could cause serious moisture problems. It is also difficult to insulate around heating ducts, plumbing, windows and doors in existing walls.University of Georgia Extension experts say the easiest and most affordable place to add insulation to an existing home is in the attic. To determine if there is enough insulation in your home’s attic, measure the thickness of the insulation. In Georgia, the typical recommended thickness if R-49 for attics, R-18 for walls and R-25 for floors, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. To maximize the benefit of attic insulation, seal any potential attic air leaks such as areas around lights and fans, electrical and plumbing entryways, knee walls, and open stud cavities.last_img read more

Walk Georgia Holidays

first_imgYou better watch out, you better not cry, you better not pout, I’m telling you why: 5 extra pounds is coming to town — only if you allow it! No one wants to be a Scrooge, and part of the joy of the holidays revolves around food. So how are we supposed to stay extra jolly and not gain extra jiggle? The secret to having your cake and eating it too is simple — get moving! A single indulgence won’t add pounds, but they tend to become the normal fare for months around the holidays. If you don’t counteract those extra treats with extra movement, you’ll see extra pounds. University of Georgia Extension’s Walk Georgia program has created a 12-day list that will help you enjoy the season to its fullest while staying active! 12 Days of Holiday HealthGive the gift of fitness. Do some research on spring races in your community and purchase registration for yourself and your best friend. Merry Fitness!Make a big red and green salad for dinner. Share it with friends on social media (and don’t forget to tag Walk Georgia). We love a spinach salad with pomegranate, pears, walnuts and Gorgonzola cheese.Take a long walk to forage pinecones, evergreen boughs, eucalyptus and holly berries. You can make a wreath, a festive centerpiece or fresh potpourri — simply simmer evergreen, orange peels and cloves in a pot of water; your house will smell lovely. Use holiday shopping as a way to burn some calories. Wear a pedometer and commit to taking 10,000 steps. You can do it! Treat yourself. Buy boxes of your favorite flavored teas. It’s an inexpensive indulgent treat that will keep you warm all month long, without adding an extra “layer.” Turn up the holiday music and get dancing. You can burn up to 610 calories after an hour of dancing.What’s one of the best seasonal workouts? Ice-skating, of course! Find a rink and lace up those skates. Ice-skating can burn over 500 calories per hour.It’s not too early to make a new year’s commitment. Reflect on the upcoming New Year today. How will you move in 2015? Simply write these down, and place then on the refrigerator to get a head start.Did you know that regular supermarkets sell roasted chestnuts? Buy a pack to share and enjoy the health benefits, including fiber, vitamins and minerals. Plus, they are lower in fat than most nuts. Bundle Up! Take a WALK, instead of a drive to see the Christmas lights this year. None in your neighborhood? Scout out the best ones then drive, park and walk. Cookies for Santa is so passé; leave Santa some real fuel. Whole-wheat banana bread is a great substitution. Find the recipe on Walk Georgia’s blog — and don’t forget carrots for the reindeer!Have some fun. Play active games with your family as a part of the Christmas fun. Or plant a permanent tree. Buy a small cyprus or pine tree and help someone in the future enjoy the beauty of the holidays.Want more fitness inspiration? Sign up for Walk Georgia’s newsletter by visiting blog.extension.uga.edu/walkgeorgia and receive healthy recipes and fitness tips. Walk Georgia is a free, online program that enables you to track and get points for moving. The website will be re-launching February 1. Walk Georgia’s mission is to inspire Georgians to move more, so that they can live more.last_img read more

Senate OKs Leahy’s Amendment To Delay Border-Crossing Requirements

first_imgSenate OKs Leahys AmendmentTo Delay Border-Crossing Requirements,As Leahy Also Beats Back BidTo Curb 1st Responder Grants To Smaller States Leahy says the lack of sufficientcoordination on the Pass Card (or Passport Card) system betweenDHS and State, and between the Bush Administration and the Government ofCanada, spells trouble for the system.  This has been shaping up asa bureaucratic nightmare that could clog our borders while making us even lesssecure, said Leahy.  We need to prod these agencies to cometo grips with these problems and fix them beforehand, not afterward. In the home stretch to the bills Senate passage Thursday evening,Leahy successfully led the effort to beat back an attempt to weaken the fundingformula he authored for first-responder grants his all-state minimumformula that has brought more than $65 million to Vermont in the last fouryears.  The Leahy grant formula, which he included in the USA PATRIOT Act of2001, assures that Vermont and other states receive basic grants for their firstresponder agencies the police, fire and rescue departments that areresponsible for homeland security and emergency preparedness.  The bid toweaken the Leahy formula lost in a vote of 34 to 66. The certification requirements in LeahysWHTI amendment require the two departments to:1.     Ensure that thetechnology for any Passport Card meets certain security standards andthat DHS and State agree on that technology.2.     Share the technologywith the governments of Canada and Mexico.3.     Justify the fee setfor the Passport Card.  4.     Develop analternative procedure for groups of children traveling across the border underadult supervision with parental consent. WASHINGTON (Thursday, July 13) Vermont Thursday scored twosignificant policy wins engineered by Sen. Patrick Leahy as the U.S. Senate passedthe annual homeland security budget bill. Install all necessary technological infrastructure at the ports of entry to process the cards and train U.S. agents at the border crossings in all aspects of the new technology. 6.     Make the PassportCard available for international land and sea travel between the United States and Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean and Bermuda.7.     Establish a unified implementationdate for all sea and land borders.  The bill also includes Leahys legislation to postpone andimprove implementation of the controversial Pass Card system for bordercrossings, which will require new identity cards and methods for crossing U.S. borders, including the Northern Border with Canada.  Leahy and Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) earlier had added tothe bill their amendment to delay implementation of the Pass Card system part of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) — for 17 months, untilJune 1, 2009, and to require the Secretary of Homeland Security and theSecretary of State to certify to Congress that several standards are met beforethe program moves forward.  Leahy is a senior member of the Appropriations Committee and of itsHomeland Security Subcommittee, which handled the Senates work indrafting the annual appropriations bill for the Department of HomelandSecurity.  The bill now goes to conference with the House version of thebill, which does not include Leahys WHTI amendment but which does alsomaintain the Leahy formula for first-responder grants. # # # # #last_img read more

UVM College of Medicine names John Lunde, MD, Buttles Professor of Pathology

first_imgEdwin Bovill, M.D., professor and chair of pathology, has announced that John Lunde, M.D., associate professor of pathology and medicine, has been named the recipient of the Buttles Professorship in Pathology for 2009-2014. Established in 1984 to honor the late Ernest Hiram Buttles, M.D.’08, who served as chair of pathology and bacteriology from 1921 to 1946, the professorship recognizes a pathology faculty member for their commitment to and excellence in the teaching of pathology.Born in 1880 and raised in Brandon, Vt., Dr. Buttles received an undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont in 1901 and graduated second in the College of Medicine’s Class of 1908. According to Roy Korson, M.D., professor of pathology emeritus, Buttles was “best remembered as a teacher and model for clear thinking. His opinions were respected in the classroom as well as in his pathology practice.”Like Buttles, Lunde, who joined the UVM faculty in 1987, received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from UVM. Medical students have recognized him for his teaching excellence several times over the years. In 2007, the Class of 2009 presented Lunde with The Foundations Teaching Award, which recognizes clarity of lectures and overall outstanding teaching ability. He was also named Basic Science Teacher of the Year by the Class of 2000. Other awards he has received include the Golden Apple Award for best teacher with limited contact hours from the Classes of 1998 and 2000, as well as the Silver Stethoscope Award from the Class of 2007, given to teachers with few lecture hours, but who have made a substantial contribution to students’ education.Source: UVMlast_img read more

$36.4 million in business financing approved by VEDA

first_img-30- The Vermont Economic Development Authority (VEDA) has approved $36.4 million in economic development financing assistance for a variety of large and small business projects. The financing support will leverage additional private investment, generating a total of $104.6 million in economic activity throughout Vermont.“VEDA is pleased to offer loan and other financing support to a number of commercial, renewable energy, small business, educational and agricultural initiatives,” said Jo Bradley, VEDA’s Chief Executive Officer. “These projects will bring jobs to Vermonters, and help stimulate Vermont’s economy.”Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) federal stimulus funds, VEDA approved the following Recovery Zone Facility Bond issuance:· Green Mountain Power, Colchester – Green Mountain Power received final approval for $25 million in Recovery Zone Facility Bond (RZF) financing support from VEDA. The special facility bonds, which received preliminary approval from VEDA in January, utilize federal tax exemptions provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Green Mountain Power also received final Authority approval for an additional $5 million in taxable bonds to support expenditures planned for the following year. Green Mountain Power plans over the next two years to undertake numerous large capital projects throughout Chittenden, Addison, Caledonia, Washington, Windham, and Windsor counties. Projects include substation upgrades, renewable energy deployment, hydro-dam refurbishing, and reliability and transmission projects. Total project costs are anticipated to be $31.7 million in 2010, and an additional $46.6 million in capital expenditures in 2011. Green Mountain Power serves 122 Vermont communities across nine counties in the state. The electric utility employs 191 persons, a number expected to grow modestly within three years, due in part to these projects.Other bond financing approved by VEDA:· Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc., Brattleboro – Final approval was given for issuance of $3 million in tax-exempt industrial revenue bond financing to support the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing’s extensive energy conservation upgrades at the Brattleboro campus, and their refinance of existing debt from prior renovations. Originally established in 1904 as the Austine School, the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. now provides comprehensive educational and support services through several programs to deaf and hard of hearing children, adults, and families throughout Vermont and surrounding states. The school’s campus consists of multiple school and dormitory buildings on approximately 174 acres of land. The school employs 201 persons, a number expected to grow to 229 within three years of the project.Among the projects approved by VEDA to receive direct loan assistance:· Vermont Biomass Energy Company, Island Pond – Financing of $1.3 million was approved to the Vermont Biomass Energy Company to support the planned construction and operation of a wood pellet manufacturing facility in Island Pond. The $18.8 million project will convert the 80,000 square foot former Ethan Allen furniture manufacturing facility in Island Pond into a production plant. Community National Bank has approved a $10 million loan for the project, to be secured by a USDA Rural Development guarantee. In addition, the Township of Brighton will be submitting an application for $1 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for the project. Employment projections at the new manufacturing plant over three years are 34 jobs, with estimates that another 120 indirect jobs may be created as a result of the project.· Sugarsnap, Burlington – Financing of $75,000 was approved to support the expansion plans of Sugarsnap, a small fresh food farm and retail operation located on Riverside Avenue in Burlington. Opportunities Credit Union is also participating in the project, which will enable Sugarsnap to develop and outfit a production kitchen and office to serve additional retail locations planned within the next several years. Sugarsnap employs 7 persons, a number expected to grow to 21 within three years of the project.· Flex-A-Seal, Essex Junction – VEDA approved a $51,176 loan as part of a $127,939 machinery and equipment acquisition project at Flex-A-Seal, Inc.  The project will enable the company to grow their operations as producers and assemblers of different types of mechanical sealing products. Flex-A-Seal employs 54, a number expected to increase to 63 jobs within three years of the project.Through the Authority’s new Technology Loan Program, designed to assist smaller technology-related firms, VEDA approved $31,500 to Computer Care in Colchester to help the business expand their market area, purchase equipment, and hire additional employees.In addition, VEDA approved:· $1.2 million in financing to Vermont farmers through the Authority’s agricultural loan program, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation (VACC); and· $719,396 to support small business development projects through the Vermont Small Business Loan Program.VEDA’s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.5 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.Source: VEDA. 3.9.2010last_img read more