Watch This 17-Year-Old Bad Ass Play With Los Lobos In Chicago

first_imgLos Lobos are currently on tour, welcoming special guests to share the stage from city to city. After a four-night stand at City Winery Chicago, the band made it over to SPACE in Evanston where seventeen-year-old Althea Grace made quite the impression. Thea is one half of the duo Future Stuff, who can only be described as Tedeschi Trucks Band meets The White Stripes meets Shakey Graves. So when the young singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist took the stage, fans of Lobos were pleasantly pleased with the in-your-face indie blues that the young woman had to offer.The not-yet-old-enough-to-drive show-stopper led the band through KoKo Taylor‘s “Voodoo Woman”, a song choice inspired by the cover that Susan Tedeschi performs. (Also note the Derek Trucks red Gibson SG). Thea first played with Lobos when she was eight-years-old, so to see how far she’s come since then was a treat for all.Thea and her band Future Stuff have a lot to be excited about, including an upcoming tour to be announced in the coming weeks. Check them out here, and enjoy the video below:[Photo by Edward Spinelli]last_img read more

DelFest 2018 Adds Greensky Bluegrass, David Grisman’s Dawg Trio, Infamous Stringdusters, & More

first_imgAfter announcing its initial lineup in mid-December, DelFest has just announced a number of additions to its 2018 lineup. Additions to DelFest 2018, which will take place from May 24th through 27th at Cumberland, Maryland’s Allegany County Fairgrounds, include Greensky Bluegrass, The Dawg Trio with David Grisman, Danny Barnes, & Sam Grisman, Richard Thompson, The Infamous Stringdusters, Mandolin Orange, The California Honeydrops, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades, The New Orleans Suspects, Grass Is Dead, and more.These artists join a bill with The Del McCoury Band, The Travelin’ McCourys, The Bluegrass Congress (featuring The Del McCoury Band, David Grisman, Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush, Bela Fleck, Jerry Douglas, Bryan Sutton, and Stuart Duncan), Old Crow Medicine Show, Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, Sam Bush, The Jerry Douglas Band, The Wood Brothers, Fruition, and others.You can take a look at the fully updated lineup below, and head over to the event’s website for more information and ticketing.last_img read more

Helping teachers learn

first_imgFive years ago, Houston elementary school administrator Christian Stevenson Winn attended her first Project Zero Classroom, the annual summer conference at Harvard that helps teachers learn innovative educational practices and become better educators.Winn, who is the elementary assistant principal at the T.H. Rogers School, not only learned new strategies to engage students, but she also gained a chance to reflect on her professional practice and explore dilemmas and challenges educators face in their daily work.“Professionally, it was a life-changing experience,” said Winn, whose school is among Houston’s top 10 elementary schools. “Project Zero Classroom gives you the opportunity to develop your own questions around teaching and learning that present a challenge for you. It could be around curriculum, pedagogy, or a professional aspiration that you want to dive into to improve and grow.”Inspired by that first conference, Winn created the Houston Learning Network to share some of the lessons learned at Project Zero Classroom. She said one of the innovations that teachers have put in practice has been to open their classrooms to colleagues so they can visit, observe, and provide feedback.Winn will attend this year’s program as a study group leader, joining more than 360 educators who have signed up to participate. It will be held July 22‒26.Since it was founded 23 years ago under the umbrella of Project Zero, an influential, research-based project at the Graduate School of Education (GSE), Project Zero Classroom has drawn more than 7,000 educators from all over the world.It’s not a typical conference, said Daniel Gray Wilson, director and principal investigator of Project Zero Classroom. Participants learn about the latest research studies in the field of education conducted by more than 30 Project Zero researchers studying key questions such as how teachers can design learning experiences that unleash students’ full potential, how to help students become complex thinkers, and how schools can personalize learning for a diverse student body.“We want to create a learning community for teachers, where they can learn about the latest educational research and learn from one another,” said Wilson. “The program operates at two levels: First there is a deep conceptual shift in the assumption about what it means for humans to learn and think, and then there’s the practical level about tools, practices, and tips they learn to support learning and thinking.”Wilson said one of the new strategies teachers learn involves finding ways to help students move beyond rote memorization. For example, if a class is learning history, students may be asked to write a musical piece or an essay comparing a historical event to a current one.“In today’s world, memorization is less and less important,” he said. “It’s about using that knowledge or information in responsible and critical ways. Educators are faced with the challenge of how to no longer just simply be the person who’s transmitting information and instead be the curator of a more creative application of information.”,The program has 100 faculty conducting workshops, study groups, and lectures. A key component is the small study groups in which participants discuss cutting-edge educational concepts such as teaching for better understanding, making learning visible, and developing the motivation and skills to help students think critically.One of the goals of the small discussions is to help participants ponder strategies to put the new ideas in practice, said Wilson. “One of the key questions when they go back home is how they can support each other,” he said. “In many cases, it’ll be very hard to change the practices, the beliefs, and the cultures of schools. Often, educators come in groups so when they go home, they’re not going home alone. They’re going home with support from other colleagues.”At T.H. Rogers School, which has sent 35 teachers and administrators to the summer program in recent years with financial support from the Harvard Club of Houston, the changes have been noticeable, said Winn. The participating teachers are always eager to practice what they learn and use their classrooms as laboratories.In early May, Harvard President Larry Bacow met with teachers and administrators from T.H. Rogers during a tour of the southwest.For Winn, the relationship between her school and Harvard has been instrumental. T.H. Rogers serves both gifted and multiply impaired students, including the deaf and hard of hearing, and a culturallydiverse student population of nearly 1,000, with a breakdown of 47 percent Asian, 21 percent Hispanic, 15 percent white, 13 percent African American, and 4 percent multiracial.Most of the students are high performers, but Winn said her goal and that of her teachers is to help them become “complex thinkers in all kind of areas.” It’s a job that is never-ending, she said.“Project Zero is a pivotal learning experience that promotes exploration, risk-taking, and the idea that you’re never there,” said Winn. “As educators, we’re always in a constant quest to find new ways to better meet the needs of the kids who sit in front of us.”last_img read more

Students volunteer at Ted Cruz rally

first_imgJust five days before the Indiana presidential primaries, Ted Cruz paid a visit to South Bend to rally voters in pursuit of a crucial win in the race for the Republican nomination.Junior Dylan Stevenson, who attended the rally for the Texas senator at the Century Center on Thursday, said the place was “buzzing” with excitement and enthusiasm.“You had elderly people there, people with families,” Stevenson, vice president of College Republicans, said. “You had men and women, people of all shapes and sizes. It was a really diverse group. I’m guessing there were several principles that united the crowd, but if you were to see these people wandering around the store, you wouldn’t think they necessarily were to share political beliefs.”Fresh off a series of losses on the East Coast, Cruz seeks to defeat frontrunner Donald Trump in what has been deemed a deciding state primary by analysts. If Trump wins Indiana, he will likely secure the 1,237 votes needed the win the Republican delegate majority.Freshman Isabel Teixeira said Cruz discussed the unusual amount of power and responsibility held by Hoosier voters, as the Indiana primaries are often held too late to have a significant effect on national level.“The fact that Indiana is such a big deal this year shows what a weird election this is and what a divided election it is,” she said.Teixeira and freshman Lizzie Cameron said their biggest reason for attending the rally was to see Carly Fiorina in one of her first public appearances since being named Cruz’s running mate this past Wednesday.“There’s no one I really feel strongly about voting for, so we decided to go check out Cruz to see what he’s like,” Cameron said. “I like Carly a lot, and she talked about how close [she and Cruz] have grown and how he’s a really good, hardworking guy.”Cruz’s speech was catered for an Indiana audience and focused on three main points — jobs and wages, freedom and security, sophomore John Kill said.“At the moment, he was speaking to people in South Bend, but I think his audience at large was the people of Indiana,” he said. “The points he spoke to are the things Indiana conservatives, generally really care about and want to protect.”Junior Pat Crane, president of College Republicans, said Cruz put an emphasis Indiana jobs, particularly manufacturing jobs, which are being outsourced to other countries.“Touching on what really has been Trump’s line this whole time, we really want to bring these jobs back,” he said. “He was laying out an effective strategy for that.”In terms of freedom, Crane said Cruz promoted a return to a “Constitutional outlook” on life. Cruz also touched on religious liberty, a relevant topic in light of Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed in 2015, Kill said.Stevenson said the senator looks to increase and strengthen national security in line with typical Republican platforms.“He’s going to rebuild the military so it’s not depleted, so it can take on radical Islam,” he said. “It’s a peace through strength sort of strategy.”Kill said Cruz made a point to differentiate himself as the “true conservative” candidate.“Not only did he say Donald Trump wasn’t a conservative, but he said he was just the masculine version of Hilary Clinton,” Kill said.“I think that was his point — not just to the people in South Bend that were there, but to his general audience in Indiana — that look, you know, the election is coming down to here,” he said. “You’re either going to vote for me, or you’re going to vote for Donald Trump. And a vote for Donald Trump is basically a vote for Hilary Clinton.”Kill plans to intern for the Texas senator this summer in his Houston office. Although he will not be involved in the campaign process, Kill said he will support Cruz in the presidential race.“I resonate with a lot of the things he said. … He’s a good family man, comes from a background that shows the importance of hard work and dedication to your family, to your country, to values and principles that I support,” he said.Stevenson said roughly 25 College Republicans members volunteered at the rally.“The energy was great. People started chanting ‘Ted’ part-way through,” he said. “There was really good energy, just overall a really good event. I don’t know what the Trump event will be like, but it’ll be tough to top that.”Cruz is not the only candidate targeting South Bend — Bernie Sanders will host a rally at Century Center on Sunday, while Trump is set to visit the same location Monday.Crane said he hopes to get a similar Notre Dame crowd for the Trump campaign.“That volunteer work is something we want to keep up, whether or not the nominee is Cruz,” he said. “You know, either way, we really want to support the nominee.”Kill said the University’s political atmosphere is sure to provide a stimulating forum for students as the 2016 election draws nearer.“Being here at Notre Dame, the combination of being Catholic and being millennials, that whole mix of things makes it a very interesting political climate. We’re not a left-leaning school, we’re not a right-leaning school — we’re somewhere in the middle,” he said.Associate News Editor Rachel O’Grady contributed to this story.Tags: 2016 Election, Indiana primary, Ted Cruz, Ted Cruz rallylast_img read more

SMC students host Hypatia Day to encourage STEM participation

first_imgSaint Mary’s will emphasize feminism in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields this Saturday with Hypatia Day. Named after the Greek mathematician, astronomer and philosopher Hypatia, the conference takes place to encourage young girls in seventh and eighth grades interested in participating in STEM fields.Associate professor of mathematics and computer science Kristin Kuter said the day is meant to interest more young women in STEM fields before they enter high school.“The goal is to encourage these girls to continue to study STEM and to pursue an education in STEM,” Kuter said.These girls will participate with Saint Mary’s students in activities in the fields in which they are interested. The chemistry, biology, physics, math, computer science, engineering and nursing clubs will host sessions with the girls, teaching them new things and giving demonstrations.The day will start with a speech from keynote speaker Laura Kloepper, assistant biology professor. Kloepper said she wants to inspire younger girls to be in science.“I like to get other people excited, not just about my work, but about science in general too,” Kloepper said.After the speech, the girls will go to sessions and demonstrations in their chosen fields.The biology club will help its participants to extract DNA from strawberries and put the DNA in necklaces.“All the students can go home wearing a necklace of strawberry DNA,” Kloepper said.Senior biology major Stephanie Dreessen said the club will also have the students examine and dissect preserved specimens.“We have a sheep heart, some crayfish, [we’ll] look at differences of a turtle that lives on land verses water, some owls,” Dreessen said. “And we’re also looking at some genetic base stuff, such as fruit flies, seeing some differences underneath a microscope.”According to senior nursing major Tyler Booth, the girls attending the nursing session will learn a lot of nursing practices, including bandaging and taking vitals.“We’re teaching them how to wrap legs and arms,” Booth said, “We’re teaching them how to take pulses, blood pressures. We’re teaching them how to listen to heart sounds and lung sounds on our medi-man.”Junior physics and applied math major Rachel Bonek said the physics club will teach its students projectile motion with a mini-cannonball demonstration.“They can calculate how far it’s going to go based on the angle in the force we put behind it,” Bonek said. “It should be fun.”One of the events of the day focuses on talking to parents about how to encourage their daughters who are interested in science.“We talk about the academic preparation and development of the daughters,” Kuter said.Senior biology major Cassie Libbing will be on the student panel, made up of STEM majors, which will answer parents’ questions about education and how to support their daughters.“Just by sharing experience, I think it gives them a better vision of what it might come to be for their daughters and also see the variety of paths you can take within the STEM area,” Libbing said.For the event, almost as many Saint Mary’s students will volunteer as there are girls that attend. Kuter said this can influence the visiting girls by showing how many female college students are pursing majors in STEM fields.“These middle schoolers really do get to see a lot of examples of the possibilities and what the potential is with these undergraduate Saint Mary’s students,” Kuter said.Part of Hypatia Day’s goal is to reach out to girls in this age group to keep them from dropping their interest in the sciences, and Kuter said the impact of the day should keep these girls interested in science.“Research has shown that that is the age when girls start pulling away from the STEM fields,” Kuter said. “That transition is key in order to keep women engaged within the STEM fields.”Kloepper said Saint Mary’s, as an all-women’s college, facilitates a connection between its students and young girls interested in the sciences through events like Hypatia Day.“It’s nice that we have this opportunity to reach out to them and kind of say, ‘No, stick with it, it’s an amazing career path,’” Kloepper said.Booth said she personally felt this impact when she was in middle school.“I felt I was very English-y and liked writing, and I wasn’t really interested in sciences because I thought that was something only boys did,” Booth said. “So I think it’s important to inspire them and show them that it’s something they can do too.”Tags: Hypatia Day, science, STEMlast_img read more

$36.4 million in business financing approved by VEDA

first_img-30- The Vermont Economic Development Authority (VEDA) has approved $36.4 million in economic development financing assistance for a variety of large and small business projects. The financing support will leverage additional private investment, generating a total of $104.6 million in economic activity throughout Vermont.“VEDA is pleased to offer loan and other financing support to a number of commercial, renewable energy, small business, educational and agricultural initiatives,” said Jo Bradley, VEDA’s Chief Executive Officer. “These projects will bring jobs to Vermonters, and help stimulate Vermont’s economy.”Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) federal stimulus funds, VEDA approved the following Recovery Zone Facility Bond issuance:· Green Mountain Power, Colchester – Green Mountain Power received final approval for $25 million in Recovery Zone Facility Bond (RZF) financing support from VEDA. The special facility bonds, which received preliminary approval from VEDA in January, utilize federal tax exemptions provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Green Mountain Power also received final Authority approval for an additional $5 million in taxable bonds to support expenditures planned for the following year. Green Mountain Power plans over the next two years to undertake numerous large capital projects throughout Chittenden, Addison, Caledonia, Washington, Windham, and Windsor counties. Projects include substation upgrades, renewable energy deployment, hydro-dam refurbishing, and reliability and transmission projects. Total project costs are anticipated to be $31.7 million in 2010, and an additional $46.6 million in capital expenditures in 2011. Green Mountain Power serves 122 Vermont communities across nine counties in the state. The electric utility employs 191 persons, a number expected to grow modestly within three years, due in part to these projects.Other bond financing approved by VEDA:· Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc., Brattleboro – Final approval was given for issuance of $3 million in tax-exempt industrial revenue bond financing to support the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing’s extensive energy conservation upgrades at the Brattleboro campus, and their refinance of existing debt from prior renovations. Originally established in 1904 as the Austine School, the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. now provides comprehensive educational and support services through several programs to deaf and hard of hearing children, adults, and families throughout Vermont and surrounding states. The school’s campus consists of multiple school and dormitory buildings on approximately 174 acres of land. The school employs 201 persons, a number expected to grow to 229 within three years of the project.Among the projects approved by VEDA to receive direct loan assistance:· Vermont Biomass Energy Company, Island Pond – Financing of $1.3 million was approved to the Vermont Biomass Energy Company to support the planned construction and operation of a wood pellet manufacturing facility in Island Pond. The $18.8 million project will convert the 80,000 square foot former Ethan Allen furniture manufacturing facility in Island Pond into a production plant. Community National Bank has approved a $10 million loan for the project, to be secured by a USDA Rural Development guarantee. In addition, the Township of Brighton will be submitting an application for $1 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding for the project. Employment projections at the new manufacturing plant over three years are 34 jobs, with estimates that another 120 indirect jobs may be created as a result of the project.· Sugarsnap, Burlington – Financing of $75,000 was approved to support the expansion plans of Sugarsnap, a small fresh food farm and retail operation located on Riverside Avenue in Burlington. Opportunities Credit Union is also participating in the project, which will enable Sugarsnap to develop and outfit a production kitchen and office to serve additional retail locations planned within the next several years. Sugarsnap employs 7 persons, a number expected to grow to 21 within three years of the project.· Flex-A-Seal, Essex Junction – VEDA approved a $51,176 loan as part of a $127,939 machinery and equipment acquisition project at Flex-A-Seal, Inc.  The project will enable the company to grow their operations as producers and assemblers of different types of mechanical sealing products. Flex-A-Seal employs 54, a number expected to increase to 63 jobs within three years of the project.Through the Authority’s new Technology Loan Program, designed to assist smaller technology-related firms, VEDA approved $31,500 to Computer Care in Colchester to help the business expand their market area, purchase equipment, and hire additional employees.In addition, VEDA approved:· $1.2 million in financing to Vermont farmers through the Authority’s agricultural loan program, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation (VACC); and· $719,396 to support small business development projects through the Vermont Small Business Loan Program.VEDA’s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.5 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.Source: VEDA. 3.9.2010last_img read more

BRO Athletes: Paul Nelson Heads West to Take on Moonlight Buttress

first_imgIn 1776, the Franciscan friars Dominguez and Escalante obtained funding from the Spanish Crown to seek out a new northern route from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the new colony of Monterey, California.  However, once they were in the wilderness of the Colorado Plateau, they focused more on converting Indians and seeking out new mission possibilities, rather than finding a quick route across the Great Basin.  This had actually been their main objective all along.  Kind of like when a climber gets invited to come give a historical lecture in Zion National Park, when his main objective is climbing Moonlight Buttress.Yup, I went there in my talk, and the climbers in the audience laughed, all knowing full well that 24 hours earlier this bespectacled nerd spouting off historical facts and theories had been groveling up 1000 feet of sandstone finger cracks.  And while I want to emphasize that I would have made the trip to talk about my book Wrecks of Human Ambition even if climbing had not been on the table, I’m not going to lie– the prospect of getting a paid trip to the red rock country to do my two favorite things, climb and talk about history, was a dream come true.  Thanks Zion Canyon Field Institute!IMG_0375Moonlight Buttress (10-ish pitches, 5.12ish) has hovered in my consciousness since shortly after I first started climbing in the late 1990s.  I first heard about it when one of our Utah State University climbing community members aid soloed it over spring break.  We all thought it was a big deal that he was “soloing a 5.13 big wall!” (I didn’t know the difference between aid and free climbing at the time).  A few years later, a friend of mine, also aiding it, nearly died.  She rapped off the end of her rope while bailing off of the fifth pitch, and was only saved when a tangle of slings self-arrested her mid-fall (yeah, it’s complicated).As my years as a climber progressed, several of my friends and partners from Indian Creek began getting on the route as a sort of final exam in the crack techniques that the Creek fostered.  I wanted to get on it, but found great reasons to put it off.  My multi-pitch resume was pretty thin.  I wasn’t a solid 12+/13- crack climber.  Then I moved to the humid East, first to Texas, then Ohio, then West Virginia, and desert crack climbing faded back into distant memory, even as I matured and improved as an overall climber.Then, this past winter, I got back to the Southwest, mostly for long, moderate routes in Red Rocks.  It was nice to be back in the desert.  Although I love my current home at the New River Gorge, and stand by my hyperbolic statements about its Nuttal Sandstone being the best medium for rock climbing ever, the desert southwest will always be my first love, and true home.It was during this time that I also finally made the acquaintance of Dan “Climbing Trash” Snyder, whom I’ve known through various rock climbing websites for damn near a decade.  We’ve got a few commonalities in our backgrounds– we’re both cultural “Jack Mormons,” we both have chosen to live in small town hubs of outdoor recreation, and we’ve both spent way too much time dragging tourists through canyons, over trails, and down rivers as backcountry guides.  In addition to letting me crash at his house in Virgin, UT (where gun ownership is legally mandated), Dan also hooked me up with some folks he knew who worked for the Zion Canyon Field Institute.  It turns out that they were psyched on having me come out in April and give a talk on the history of humans doing stupid stuff in the desert.  And of course, the first thing that came to mind was, “Whoa, I’ve GOT to climb Moonlight Buttress!”.Fast forward to the week of April 22 (Earth Day!).  I flew into Salt Lake City, rented a small compact car, and made the obligatory 12 hour visit to family in northern Utah before driving south on I-15.  I’m accustomed to being a dirtbag, driving across the country and spending months living out of my truck, so this new method of travel with flights, car rentals, motels, and travel receipts felt strange.  I hadn’t even packed a sleeping bag!IMG_0381It was also strange to come back to an area where I’d spent so much time as a child.  My grandfather, the late, brilliant landscape artist Harrison Groutage, was the first person to instill a love of the desert into me.  He’d built and lived in a beautiful vacation home just south of Zion through the 80s and 90s, painting countless views of the West Temple, Kolob Terrace, and Smithsonian Butte from his north-facing studio window.  Although I’d never climbed in Zion when I’d spend time at his house, it nonetheless felt like I was coming home.Anyway, enough of this sentimental reflection.  I rolled into Virgin around dark on Monday night.  Climb Tuesday, book lecture on Wednesday, maybe climb again Thursday.  I knocked back a few Knob Creek-Dr. Pepper cocktails with Dan (the guy loves his sugar), and discussed the upcoming climb for the next day.I had not had luck finding a partner whom I was confident getting on such a big, hard climb with.  Ideally, a perfect partner would have been someone who could swing leads, and was solid on the grinding, sometimes painful nature of long, desert cracks.  But although I sent out a wide-ranging message to my “dream list” of partners who I knew might be in the area around then, nothing came through.Finally, less than a week before my trip, Dan simply offered to jug the route.  This offer blew my mind.  Contrary to what a lot of people assume, jugging is hard work, in some ways just as exhausting as free climbing.  Dan had been either guiding or working as a brickmason for several weeks with no days off, and I wondered if he knew what he was getting into with this offer to jug and carry the pack on a “rest day.”  However, he’s tough, has been climbing for decades, and most importantly stays positive even in exhausting situations.  I’ve bailed off of big walls before because partners became negative and complaining, but I knew that Dan would not do this.Still, this offer of jugging brought its own challenges.  I’d be leading every pitch, and the impetus to get up the route rested solely on me.  This would be a change from all other long, hard routes that I’d done, such as Red Rocks’ Rainbow Wall or Potrero Chico’s Sendero Luminoso, in which I was climbing with partners who were much better than I was.  The pressure was on!Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 6.19.41 PMAlthough I’d been training hard in the months leading up to this climb, and was in very good shape as far as endurance goes, there were plenty of things I could have done better in preparation for Moonlight.  I could have scheduled a longer trip to brush up on my neglected desert crack technique.  I could have climbed more pitches of trad back at the New River Gorge (I think I led one pitch of 5.11 gear that entire spring).Shoulda, woulda, coulda.  I didn’t know what my exact goal for Moonlight was.  I knew that I wanted to give it a very good attempt at onsighting (actually, more like flashing, since I’ve watched so many videos and talked to so many  people about it), but was pretty sure that I would get bouted.  I thought that maybe, if I didn’t completely get my ass handed to me and did it with just a couple mistakes, I might try to get back on the route on Thursday.Anyway, we got up at 5:30am the next morning; I had no appetite, but put away two cups of black coffee and two peanut butter/banana burritos.  We packed food, water, and cigarettes for Dan.  One 70 meter rope, one gri gri, ascenders, and a shit ton of cams, none larger than a red camalot.  I was particularly wary about the half dozen purple camalots we had, since that is by far my weakest size of crack (a couple millimeters bigger than a fingerlock).  We drove through Zion Canyon as the sun rose, feeling extra special with the VIP pass that we’d gotten from a ranger, which allowed us to drive into the shuttle bus-only section of the canyon.  The approach was chill; easy river crossing, easy scramble to the base of the route.On the first four pitches, which are basically the approach to the six-pitch 5.12 splitter and corner finger cracks, I got off route a couple times, but felt great.  At the base of the 5.12 section, a ledge 350 feet up called the “rocker block” we converged with two other parties: a pair of free climbers, and a very fast-moving aid climber who also had his own jug/support sherpa.  Both groups were very chill; we sat on the ledge, bantered about mutual acquaintances and beta, and watched as another group made its way up from the base of the route.Gazing up the imposing corner, I could make out fixed anchors, plenty of tickmarks, and even some chalk scrawlings on the wall that said “B” and “Y”– I realized later that some goober was reminding himself where to put blue and yellow cams.  Oh well, this was not a wilderness route, it was not even an adventure route; it was just hundreds of feet of glorious finger crack.The corner pitches– the first (pitch 5 of the entire route) is a hard v5-ish boulder problem to a 5.11 fingercrack, and the second (pitch 6) is a wild layback/stemming affair– went smoothly.  The 5.12+ “crux” layback sixth pitch has probably gotten a bit wider over the years, because I got tips jams the whole way.Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 6.19.14 PMPitch 7 was the one which I had heard the most about being awkwardly hard, and it definitely took a lot out of me: a physical squeeze chimney up to a point where you reach WAY back into a corner for a flared ringlock, and then have to make a 180 degree rotation from facing left to facing right.  I must have accidently read this the right way, because I managed to get the rotation, and even flexed my fat hips to get a no-hands position in the hardest part!  Unfortunately, in the enduro off-fingers layback above, the pump finally caught up with me, and I took a little fall.  Booo!  We made it up to a really nice ledge at the base of pitch 8 (a beautiful 12a finger splitter, best climbing on the route), where we ate, drank, and lounged around, waiting for the aid party to get further ahead of us.I fell once more that day, on pitch 9, which I thought was the hardest of the route, with 30 feet of off-fingers splitter.  After this point, the route turned into really cool, but kind of scary face and pinscar climbing.  Pitch 10, a 12a called the “Nutter” pitch, was a struggle; I was digging pretty deep into the reserves, and there was one moment where I stopped, 15 feet above a tiny tcu in soft rock, and thought, “holy shit, if this was a single pitch route at the NRG, it would be the day’s highpoint if I onsighted it!  I’d go home and start drinking!”  But in the context of this huge route, it was just another challenge that I had to bang out almost mindlessly.One more pitch of 5.10+ handcrack over a little roof, then some juggy slabbaineering and we were at the top.  Even with the other parties on the wall and the leisurely pace, we managed to do the route in about nine hours.  After a quick jaunt down the West Rim trail and a few conversations with tourists, we were drinking margaritas in Springdale.  Damn good day.I was pretty happy with how we did on Moonlight Buttress.  No epics, no all-out ass kickings, just good, tired fun.  Who knows, maybe if I had been swinging leads, instead of leading every pitch, I would have had a better shot of onsighting it, but I was psyched to have done the thing in good time, with just a couple falls.  Unfortunately, however, my body was so wrecked, and my fingers so sore from the endless fingerlocks that I knew there was no way I could go back on Thursday to redpoint the pitches I had fallen on.  We went cragging, and I barely made it up a single-pitch 5.11.  Three weeks later, and my fingers STILL hurt.In terms of the training I did, I was happy with my approach, and the constant mileage of steep sport and gym routes was key to building my endurance.  But again, who knows, maybe if I had been able to go cragging for a couple days in Zion or Indian Creek, again I maybe, just maybe would have had a shot at actually onsighting the route.  But I can’t be disappointed at all; this was a fairly “off-the-couch” desert climbing experience for me (in terms of the rock type, not fitness).Three days later, I was back at the New River Gorge, climbing single pitch, bombproof sandstone in 80% humidity.  The contrast could not be greater.  My fitness, which I had been training by periodization to peak for Zion, predictably plateaued out by late April as well.  Now, as the Appalachian Spring is gradually giving way to summer, my body and fingers have still not yet fully recovered from Zion, and I can tell that I desperately need a break from climbing for a month or so.  Fortunately, whitewater season is just around the corner.Without a doubt, this was one of the best climbing trips I’ve had, despite its brevity.  Although I did not send (hopefully I’ll get to return to finish the route off), I identified a “dream route” that I’ve wanted to do for over a decade, trained specifically for it, and gave it a great go.  The fact that I was able to incorporate this into my literary and intellectual life only added more to the experience.  Climbing, history, and landscape have always been intertwined for me, whether in humid Appalachia or the arid Southwest.Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 6.19.27 PMlast_img read more

Paraguay police kill second rebel chief

first_img Paraguayan police killed a leader of a leftist rebel group blamed for kidnappings and murders in remote areas, authorities said, a victory for President Fernando Lugo whose popularity is waning. Gabriel Zarate is the second leader of the Paraguay People’s Army (EPP) to be gunned down in shootouts with police in as many months. The government is cracking down on the small Marxist group that operates in a cattle-raising region near the Brazilian border. The rebels have terrified ranchers but have had little impact on overall investment in the world’s No. 4 soy exporter. Lugo, a left-leaning former Roman Catholic bishop who took office in 2008, is accused of failing to deliver on campaign pledges to redistribute wealth in the politically unstable country. He has also been weakened by paternity scandals. Lugo, who was diagnosed with cancer last month, has admitted to fathering a child when he was still a cleric. The EPP lacks the size and reach of larger South American insurgencies. But the provinces it operates in are home to large beef ranches, and their economic importance is growing. Zarate’s death could trigger fresh attacks on security forces in the region, which also is a marijuana-growing area. In April gunmen killed two people in an attack on a senator who denounced drug smuggling. Paraguay is an important regional supplier of marijuana. By Dialogo September 08, 2010last_img read more

January 15, 2005 Notices

first_img Notice Garel seeks Florida Bar readmission Arthur M. Garel of Miami has petitioned the Florida Board of Bar Examiners for Bar readmission.Garel resigned from the practice of law in Florida pursuant to a January 1995, Supreme Court order under allegations of trust account violations.The Florida Board of Bar Examiners will conduct a public hearing on Garel’s application for readmission and all Bar members are invited to write to the board regarding their knowledge of Garel, particularly in relation to his character and fitness for readmission.If you wish to be notified of the time and place of the hearing, submit a written request to Eleanor Mitchell Hunter, Executive Director, Florida Board of Bar Examiners, 1891 Eider Court, Tallahassee 32399-1750. R osenthal petitions for reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, Joel N. Rosenthal has petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for Bar reinstatement from a rehabilitative suspension.Rosenthal’s suspension was effective December 16, 1999, and was for a period of three years resulting from a felony conviction.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Rosenthal’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Barnaby Lee Min, Bar Counsel, The Florida Bar, Suite M-100, 444 Brickell Avenue, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 377-4445. Franjola petitions for reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, George Franjola has petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for Bar reinstatement.Franjola’s suspension was effective August 24, 1998, and was for a period of three years resulting from a felony conviction for possession of cocaine.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Franjola’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Jan K. Wichrowski, Chief Branch Disciplinary Counsel, The Florida Bar, 1200 Edgewater Dr., Orlando 32804-6314, phone (407) 425-5424. Comments sought on Judge Bodiford The current term of the office of part-time U.S. Magistrate Larry A. Bodiford is due to expire September 23. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida is required by law to establish a panel of citizens to consider the reappointment of the magistrate judge to a new four-year term.The duties of the magistrate judge position include the following: conduct of most preliminary proceedings in criminal cases; trial and disposition of misdemeanor cases; conduct of various pretrial matters and evidentiary hearings on delegation from the judges of the district court; and conduct of final hearings for naturalization and admission of attorneys.Comments from members of the Bar and the public are invited as to whether the incumbent magistrate judge should be recommended by the panel for reappointment by the court and should be directed to: William M. McCool, Clerk, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida, 111 N. Adams St., Tallahassee 32301. Comments must be received by March 31. 11th JNC seeks judicial applicants The 11th Circuit JNC is now accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the circuit bench created by the elevation of Judge Richard J. Suarez to the Third DCA.Applicants must be registered voters, members of the Bar for the preceding five years, and reside in the 11th Circuit upon assuming office.Applications may be obtained from JNC Co-chairs Gerald I. Kornreich or Manuel Kadre at the Law Offices of Kornreich and Terraferma, Bank of America Tower, Suite #3950, 100 Southeast Second Street, Miami 33131or the Bar’s Web site at www.flabar.org.An original plus 10 copies of the completed application must be received by Kornreich or Kadre no later than 5 p.m. January 17. Those who have previously submitted applications to the commission must submit new applications. 11th JNC seeks judicial applicants The 11th Circuit JNC is now accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the circuit bench created by the resignation of Judge Alex E. Ferrer.Applicants must be registered voters, members of the Bar for the preceding five years, and reside in the 11th Circuit upon assuming office.Applications may be obtained from JNC Co-chairs Gerald I. Kornreich or Manuel Kadre at the Law Offices of Kornreich and Terraferma, Bank of America Tower, Suite #3950, 100 Southeast Second Street, Miami 33131or the Bar’s Web site at www.flabar.org.An original plus 10 copies of the completed application must be received by Kornreich or Kadre no later than 5 p.m. January 19. Those who have previously submitted applications to the commission must submit new applications. Spittler petitions for reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, John Joseph Spittler, Jr., has petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for Bar reinstatement from a rehabilitative suspension.Spittler’s suspension was effective July 17, 2001, and was for a period of nine months resulting from misconduct in the filing of improper bankruptcy schedules and transfer of property.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Spittler’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Carlos A. Leon, Bar Counsel, The Florida Bar, Suite M-100, 444 Brickell Avenue, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 377-4445. January 15, 2005 Notices January 15, 2005 Noticeslast_img read more

Collaborating competitors: The future of CUSOs

first_imgThe sixth cooperative principle is probably the best definition of a credit union service organization, specifically:“Cooperation among cooperatives: Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional and international structures.”Early CUSO models, like CU Direct Lending and CO-OP Financial Services were extremely successful because it gave access to essential products/services at an affordable price. And I have to admit I have always been smitten with the shared branch CUSO model. In my opinion that should have been our “National Brand Campaign” about the credit union difference. We work together!Then many of us became competitors with field of membership changes that included community charters that of course overlapped. In fact, one of the arguments I have heard against joining the shared branch network is, “I don’t want to send my members to my competitors.” But what if we collaborated with our competitors? continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more