New Pedestrian Recycling Containers Coming To Downtown Olympia

first_imgSubmitted by the City of OlympiaBeginning November 21, 2012, six new pedestrian recycle containers will be conveniently located for public use throughout downtown Olympia. The new blue, 24-gallon, metal recycle containers will be placed next to existing garbage cans for convenience, familiarity and ease of use. Each container lists the acceptable items for recycling (cans, plastic and glass bottles and newspapers). Locations are as follows:4th  Avenue and Cherry Street (in front of City Hall);Washington Street and State Street (in front of Intercity Transit);4th Avenue and Capitol Way;4th  Avenue and Franklin Street;5th Avenue and Capitol Way; and5th Avenue and Washington Street (in front of Wind Up Here Toys).Containers are strictly for pedestrian and public use and are not intended to replace or supplement business or multifamily recycling.The containers provide public users of downtown Olympia the opportunity to recycle while visiting instead of throwing recyclable items in the garbage. Each recycle container can hold approximately 100 cans or plastic bottles.The containers were purchased and installed by the City’s Waste ReSources. Collection will be performed by the City of Olympia’s Ambassador Program, Clean Team. Clean Team members will monitor and empty containers weekly. They will collect and sort the contents to be recycled, and the Waste ReSources Collectors will haul it for recycling on their regular route. If successful, Waste ReSources will be looking into adding additional recycle containers in the coming year. Facebook7Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

“Saints Have a Plan” Campaign Helps Future Grads Develop Job-Hunting Tools

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Saint Martin’s University Even before the Class of 2015 arrives on campus for its senior year, Saint Martin’s University is working to help its members glide smoothly into life after graduation.While four or more years of education provide the knowledge and experiences to succeed in a particular career, many students get through their senior year without an essential – job-search skills. Through “Saints Have a Plan,” an innovative program masterminded by Ann Adams, the University’s associate dean of students and director of career development, seniors are learning the “how-to’s” in a timely manner.“College and University career centers have always offered this help,” she says. “We want students to have a plan before they are out there looking for work. With Saints Have a Plan, we’re just making it fun by packaging it and incentivizing it.”The inspiration for “the plan” came to Adams as she considered a troubling fact: Although the University’s Career Center offers an extensive array of resources and assistance to help seniors poised to transition out of college, many fail to take advantage of them until they are about to graduate, if at all. Others want to begin the process but are overwhelmed by the complexity of job-searching.In 2013, almost half of Saint Martin’s graduating seniors were job-searching at the time of graduation, missing the optimum time to get support, says the nine-year Career Center veteran.“The ideal time for them to start job-hunting is much earlier, when they can attend job fairs, get help developing resumes and start networking with potential job sources. Everyone wants to help students and offer them advice and referrals, but it is different when they become one of hundreds of job-seekers.”Last February, Adams e-mailed seniors an invitation to the new program that included a form about their post-graduation plans. The idea was to encourage students with no particular plan to get started, she said. As those without a plan developed one, they were awarded raffle tickets. Steps in the plan included listing grad schools or employers where the student was applying, getting their resume and cover letters spruced up, and creating a LinkedIn profile to enable networking online. When their plan was done, they earned a T-shirt and other goodies.  The campaign was a community effort, with professors who joined in wearing “plan” T-shirts and donating class time for Career Center staff to introduce the event. Offices donated services, gift cards and baskets, the Saint Martin’s Alumni Association sponsored tee-shirts, and local merchants contributed generous raffle prizes.Adams said 67 percent of seniors completed a plan, a high number, given some seniors completed their degrees in December and were no longer at school.Buoyed by the pilot program’s success, Saints Have a Plan will roll out again this year. Seniors completing their academic coursework in December will develop plans this fall, and those finishing coursework in May or August will submit plans beginning in January. Adams is also hoping to find additional sponsors to help build the program.In July, Adams shared information about her new program with colleagues at the national conference of the Association for Student Affairs at Catholic Colleges and Universities at St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas.“The presentation went very well and drew a great deal of interest from career counselors – even faculty from St. Mary’s dropped in after seeing the topic on the program,” she says.last_img read more

Experience the Fun, Prizes and Giveaways at Lakefair’s 50+ in the…

first_imgFacebook1Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Lynessa Stone, Advanced Health Care V.P. of Marketing, planning member of the Lakefair 50+ CommitteeYou may have experienced the crowds, the sights, the food and rides of Lakefair over the years that it has been a summertime fixture in Olympia, but you’ve probably never experienced the annual event specifically geared towards this communities seniors: Lakefair’s 50+ in the Park.  If you find yourself in that “50+” age category or know someone who is, we invite you to come down Friday, July 13 from 9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. to experience all that this day offers to our older, but wiser, citizens.Dozens of local business, like ours at Advanced Health Care, that focus on helping our senior and older adult population will be there to provide information and resources to the community, all while providing free music, entertainment, prizes, and games!  Major sponsors include Clarus Eye Center, Artesian Place, Foot & Ankle Surgical Associates and the newly constructed Fieldstone Cooper Point community.Danny Vernon returns as the beloved headliner in his “Illusion of Elvis” act.  Live demonstrations of ZUMBA and the performance of Mr. Nat Jackson, the “Jump Rope King” (fastest jump roper in the United States in the 70+ age category) will leave you impressed!Raffle prize drawings held throughout the day and each business will have free giveaways at their booths, too! 50+ in the Park is a fantastic event for ALL AGES in our community and it’s FREE! We hope to see you there.Lakefair weekend: Heritage Park, Friday, July 13 from 9:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.last_img read more

Sadio Mane drops an incredible gesture for the ball boy!

first_imgAdvertisement mn23NBA Finals | Brooklyn VsrjqkciuWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E252plb( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 1b4zscWould you ever consider trying this?😱67aCan your students do this? 🌚5lp1Roller skating! Powered by Firework Liverpool took on Chelsea in the UEFA Super Cup game and came out on the top in the penalties but something which topped the game was Sadio Mane’s incredible post-game gesture.Advertisement The Senegalese International was the talisman for Liverpool in the game as well by scoring 2 goals clinically. But, after the game Mane passed his shirt onto to the ballboy and gave him a hug. The heartwarming clip of the gesture got viral on twitter garnering 2m+ views.Advertisement “Class to see,” one Twitter user wrote.“Love Mane mate,” a second said.Advertisement “Best part of the night,” another added.While a fourth commented: “Classiest athlete on the planet and it’s not close. How can you not love this guy?”Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp said: “It was a very difficult game for both teams. It was all about winning it and we did that in the end.“Nobody in the stadium wanted extra time, it was a killer. I’m not sure about the penalty but who cares now.“We started well then dropped off… we could talk about football but it’s too late now. We had to fight and the boys did tonight.” Advertisementlast_img read more

Busy Pajama Day

first_imgBy Kathy MieleSteven walked into the room and had a concerned look on his face. It was 2 o’clock in the afternoon and I was still in my pajamas.“Are you feeling alright?” he asked.“Can you hold on for a minute?” I said to my sister, then turned my head so Steven could see that I had my phone’s headset on. “Hey, you’re home early for a Saturday,” I said to him.“I’m just stopping in for a minute. I have two more appointments before I’m really home,” he said.“Hey, Liz can I call you right back? Steven just stopped in for a minute.” I clicked my headset off and turned back to Steven. “I’m sorry. What did you say when you first walked in?”“I asked if you were feeling OK.”“Yeah, why?”“You’re still in your pajamas and bathrobe,” he said.I put down the shorts I’d been sewing a button on. “No, actually I’ve had a really busy day,” I said. “I’ve baked a batch of brownies, I’m on my third load of wash, and I’ve got a pot of sauce simmering for dinner.”I cinched my robe tighter as I headed for the laundry room to switch a load out of the washer and into the dryer. “Right now I’m working on some clothes that needed mending.”“Oh,” Steven sounded happy. “Did you get a chance to sew that missing button on my shirt?”“Done,” I answered, pointing to the pile of finished pieces already on top of the dryer.Reloading the dryer, I hit the start button and headed for the kitchen. “Do you want me to make you some deviled eggs?” I asked. “I hard-boiled a dozen earlier this morning.”“Sure, that sounds great,” Steven said as he followed me into the kitchen.“Careful, I just washed the floor. It’s not completely dry yet,” I called as he stayed in the doorway and I tiptoed in to get the eggs started.“Wow, you have been busy,” he said leaning against the doorframe.“I’ve gotten so much done. I love pajama day!” I said, cracking the shell of the first egg. “How’s your day going?” I asked.“Busy,” he said. “But not as busy as yours.”I had to laugh. “I’ve still got a few more things I want to get done before I get showered and dressed. But at the rate I’m going, if it gets any closer to dinnertime before I’m finished I might as well get showered and put on a fresh set of jammies!”I handed him a plate with a few deviled eggs and sat next to him at the dining room table while he ate.Steven shrugged his shoulders. “Hey, who’s going to know, right?”Just then the doorbell rang. I looked around the corner and saw a neighbor standing at our front door. I leaned back against my chair, trying not to be seen. “Can you get that for me?” I asked.Steven looked at me. “What’s wrong?” he asked.“Are you kidding?” I waved my hand in front of me. “I’m in my pajamas! They’re going to think I’m some sort of sloth, just hanging around all day.”“You could always explain what pajama day means to you,” he said.“Very funny,” I said as I hid in the kitchen while Steven got up to get the door.“By the way,” I whispered. “I’m not home, OK?”last_img read more

Colts Neck To Consider Whiskey & Gin Distillery Proposal

first_imgBy Joseph SapiaCOLTS NECK – The township Zoning Board is to hear a proposal to run a craft-style alcohol distillery in a non-conforming business zone on Route 34, near Delicious Orchards.GK Distilling Inc., owned by township resident Geoff Karch, is to appear before the board on Thursday, Feb. 18.GK Distilling is the contract-purchaser of the 2.71-acre property from Steven Garrett. Of the total property, about one acre would be used for the distillery, while the remaining acreage would include the relocated single-family house now on the property, a barn and detached garage.The property sits on Route 34 South, with Delicious Orchards and a medical office to the north, the Brandywine assisted-living facility to the west and south, and the state road to the east.The distillery would be housed in a new 4,500-square-foot building that would look like a barn or stable – divided into 900 square feet for a tasting room, with the remaining 3,600 feet for the distilling and storage, according to paperwork filed with the township. The new building would sit at about the site of the current house.GK Distilling would operate under state law and distill corn, rye, barley and wheat to create up to 20,000 gallons of whiskey or gin per year for wholesale and retail use. To be considered a New Jersey distilled beverage, it must either grow or buy locally 51 percent of its raw material.Those wishing to buy the product at retail to take offsite would be limited to five liters per person, only in connection with a tour of the operation. Distillery visitors would be allowed to consume a maximum of three one-ounce samples per person per day.The distillery, which would have 12 parking spaces, said it would expect no more than seven to 10 visitors per hour.Proposed business hours would be Wednesday, noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday, noon to 9 p.m.; Friday, noon to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The business would be closed Mondays and Tuesdays.There would be no food sales, but it may sell retail items such as T-shirts and hats.The distillery would employ four workers: the owner, master distiller, salesperson and an assistant worker. There would be about three truck deliveries or shipments per week.The operation would not be considered a regional attraction or produce a high volume of traffic, according to Timothy Anfuso, the township planner. This would fit the nature of a craft business, rather than a full commercial operation.The variance is needed because the B-1 zone, a zone for household-oriented businesses, does not include craft distilleries and because the house would be a non-conforming use.Aside from the variance, GK Distilling would still need local approval for a minor subdivision and both preliminary and final major site plan approval.The zoning board meeting is Thursday, Feb. 18, at 8 p.m. at Town Hall, 124 Cedar Drive.last_img read more

Middletown’s Phil Murphy Runs For Governor

first_imgDemocrat To Focus On EconomyBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – It’s about a year-and-a-half away before New Jersey residents cast a vote for their next governor and probably quite a while before voters start thinking seriously about that election. But it isn’t too early to campaign and announce one’s candidacy, believes Monmouth County’s own Philip D. Murphy, who has thrown his hat into that ring.Businessman and former U.S. ambassador to Germany, Murphy, 58, a Middletown resident, and Democrat, who at the time of his announcement last week was the first declared Democratic candidate for the 2017 gubernatorial contest, a race to determine who will succeed two-term Republican Chris Christie.Despite the fact that the race is a long way away–and probably most people, if they’re thinking about politics at all, have their attention fixed on the presidential race escapades—Murphy and his family decided it was the opportune time to break out of the starting gate.“If we can in a small way get to a better debate, get the state back on its feet sooner rather than later,” Murphy said in an interview with The Two River Times this week about his announcement, “I want to be part of that.”Murphy has had a successful career in business, having worked for about 20 years for Goldman Sachs multinational investment banking firm, holding a number of positions with the company. Before ending his full-time career with the company’s management in 2003, Murphy headed up the company’s Frankfurt, Germany, operations as well as other high-placed spots level positions. He has also been active on a number of philanthropic and civic fronts, establishing with his wife, Tammy, a teen helpline called 2nd Floor, for 180 Turning Lives Around, an organization that assists victims of domestic and sexual violence and their families, and working with other charitable organizations over the years; Murphy had been for a period the organization’s board president. He has also co-chaired Renewing Our Schools, Securing Our Future, a national task force studying public education; and Richard Codey, while serving as acting governor in 2005, selected Murphy to head up a task force looking at public service pensions and health benefits.Murphy hasn’t held elected office but has dabbled in national politics. He served as national finance chair for the Democratic National Committee under then-chairman Howard Dean (who, Murphy said, he considers a friend) from 2006 to 2009. According to his bio provided by the campaign, Murphy raised in the neighborhood of $300 million over that period for the national political party.Following his tenure with the DNC, President Barack Obama nominated Murphy to be the Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany, and with the U.S. Senate’s approval, Murphy served in that posting from 2009 until 2013.Going forward with the campaign Murphy said, “The economy is ‘job one’ in this state.”He pointed out New Jersey’s unemployment rate remains high compared to the rest of the region (and higher as the national percentage); employment hasn’t recouped yet from 2007, prior to the “Great Recession”; New Jersey has one of the highest percentage of long term unemployed (more than six months) of any state; and, Murphy said, we lead the nation in “zombie foreclosures”—where homeowners have walked away from their properties.“Those are just the facts. I wish they weren’t but they are,” he said.With a background in the private sector, in international economies, of “What works, what doesn’t,” as well as an appreciation for the public sector’s ability, Murphy maintained he has the right stuff to create jobs and right the New Jersey ship after eight years of Christie.The next governor, Murphy is convinced, needs to be “prepared to make decisions based upon what’s best for the next generation,” as opposed to “what’s best for his or her next election.”“Too many, it seems on both sides of the aisle, just kick the can down the road, borrowing from our kids’ future to make up for the lack of discipline today,” he added. “We need a leader who says enough, stop, we’re not doing that anymore.”Murphy is the youngest of four kids, growing up in a working class family outside of Boston, Massachusetts. His family were loyal Democrats, where John and Robert Kennedy were revered. Those were his roots, the commitment to hard work and the belief that the Democratic Party is dedicated to helping all, especially the middle class improve their lives, which they believe benefits the whole country, Murphy maintained. “No matter how much success I’ve had in the private and public sector,” he said, “nothing has taken me off of that set.“That’s where I started and that’s where I remain.”The campaign is just getting under way but Murphy has begun the process of reaching out, attending events, working the phones to raise money and heighten his visibility.With no incumbent, before too much longer he’ll undoubtedly have announced competition for the party’s nomination. Other names purportedly considering testing the political waters are political warhorses state Senate President Stephen Sweeney, from Gloucester County; Union County’s Senator Raymond Lesniak (whose announcement he wouldn’t be running for re-election to the Senate is seen as precipitating his run for the governor’s office) and Assemblyman John Wisniewski, from Middlesex County. Also considering joining the fray on the Democratic side is Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop, who had also previously worked for Goldman Sachs.On the GOP side, Evesham Township Mayor Randy Brown, in Burlington County, has expressed an interest in running, while Ocean County businessman Joseph Rudy Rullo has begun campaigning, establishing a Facebook page. And there is incumbent Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, apparently considering a bid for her boss’s job, as is state Senator Tom Kean Jr., who represents the 21st Legislative District in Morris County and is the son of Gov. Tom Kean.last_img read more

Train, Ferry Commuters Take Summer Disruption In Stride

first_imgBy John Burton  || As a NJ Transit commuter train left the Middletown station a couple of days after commuters had to address renovations at Penn Station, the train conductor offered a shrug and commented, “So far, so good.”For some taking NJ Transit’s North Jersey Coast Line to work or for day trips, the sentiments expressed by the conductor who declined to give a name, seemed to sum it up.Donna Garvin, Middletown, was waiting for the train, which she takes to Newark, for her work. She’s grateful not to have to travel into Manhattan and will avoid some of those recent delays and disruptions. But she’s noticed a few things that are different, though minor, in her commute. “You know it’s been getting kind of busy,” more than usual, she said, suspecting other riders are taking alternative routes to work.“It is what it is. What are you going to do?” Margret Belletta of Middletown said with a shrug of her own, as she readied to make her way to work on the train.Some of these commuters observed that traffic has been light, chalking it up to that it’s mid-July and many people are probably on vacation, avoiding some of these issues.“I was wondering how it’s going to be,” after vacations, Garvin said.Amtrak, the National Railroad Passenger Corporation, which owns and operates the more-than-a-century old commuter rail hub, Penn Station, in midtown Manhattan, began its long-planned repair project on Monday, July 10.The project is intended to repair and upgrade infrastructure, such as some electrical and track work to the aging facility, which has been plagued by delays and other problems – regularly causing agita for harried travelers. The project is expected to take until early September, transportation officials announced, and is expected to cause delays to NJ Transit, Long Island Railroad, Amtrak and local subway service operated by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), while a number of tracks are out of service.The anticipated disruptions have caused some New York media outlets to hang the moniker “Summer of Hell” on the project.But as Edward Poplawski, a Red Bank resident awaiting the train at Red Bank’s commuter station, observed, “It’s not been terrible,” for his daily trek to work in New York. He has a theory, explaining, “There’s been so much news about it, I think people have found alternative routes.”Poplawski, too, did a little planning, preparing for what this could mean for his daily commute. “I’ve taken an earlier train to avoid some of it,” he said, observing there appeared to be fewer people or about the same and schedules have been pretty steady.“It’s been nothing out of the ordinary,” said Monmouth Beach resident Richard Coplan, waiting at the Red Bank stop. “In both directions. The same as usual.“I’ve had no disruptions,” Coplan said, adding “yet.”Work was taking Red Bank’s John Cusick into New York, not a normal occurrence for him. “When I realized I had to go in today I thought I would take a later train,” he said, “to avoid the rush crush.” And it appeared to be working so far, he observed, given the lighter than usual crowd at the rail station.Debbie Docs, Little Silver, too, was taking the later train, what she dubbed “the under-achievers train,” as opposed to the earlier ones dominated by New York-bound movers-and-shakers.“Throughout the system that seems to be the account,” that things are running relatively smoothly, said Nancy Snyder, a NJ Transit spokes- woman. And that, she continued, “is the result of weeks of preparation,” among NJ Transit and the other groups involved.In addition, “Most of our customers have done their homework mapping out their travel pattern,” she observed, giving them a leg up on the process.Some have opted for the ferry service. Regular NY Water ways rider Ed Schweitzer noticed the difference this week.As his 5:10 p.m. ferry docked at the Belford terminal Tuesday, streams of riders hurriedly made their way off and home. “There’s many, many riders,” Schweitzer said. And given that, “They’re doing the best they can,” he concluded, referring to the ferry company.The issue isn’t so much the ferry, but with the available parking around the terminal, due to the extra ridership. That has forced Schweitzer to leave his car at his Middletown home, relying on his wife to pick him up, he said.“There’s competition for the seats,” he has noticed on his two daily trips. Schweitzer said he’s been assured as a long- time customer (13 years, since the terminal opened) he would have his place on the boat. “I buy the 40-ride book (of tickets) every month,” he said. “So, I think that’s fair.”“Any business will be loyal to its customers,” confirmed Pat Smith, a spokesman for NY Waterways. “If we have a loyal NY Waterway customer we’ll take them first, over somebody who showed for the first time today.”But the company has taken additional steps to accommodate what Smith confirmed has been a bump in ridership. That has included contracting with NJ Transit by operating a specific ferry line, with two boats, from Hoboken to the 39th Street terminal intended for NJ Transit customers, with NY Waterways cross-honoring tickets. The ferry company has an additional boat “that can jump from different routes,” as needed, Smith said.“We’re dealing with all of it,” he said. “The point is to take everybody we can.”This article was first published in the July 13-20, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Fight To Preserve Last Piece Of Undeveloped Bayshore Property Is On

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS –A recent Monmouth County Board of Recreation Commissioners meeting was overrun with more than 100 motivated members of Neighbors for Waterfront Preservation (NWP), a community group that has dedicated itself to safeguarding the last stretch of undeveloped beachfront on the Sandy Hook Bay.The coveted plot – referred to as the McConnell Tract after its owner Arthur “Bud” McConnell – is currently the bustling hub of the Sandy Hook Catamaran Club, as well as the headquarters of Blackfoot Mobile Marine Services. But the preservation group says its future is being threatened by an application to construct 21 homes on the property, currently before the borough planning board.Nearly 30 NWP members pleaded with the recreation commissioners for assistance in their fight for conservation, while the group’s founder, Benson Chiles, presented two architectural renderings of what the site could look like as a public park.The board pledged a joint statement in support the citizen group, but board member Michael G. Harmon questioned whether borough leaders had the political will to make a difference.“It’s the mayor and council that have to decide whether or not they are in favor of preservation. And if they are, then they should come out and say that,” said Harmon, an Atlantic Highlands resident. “It’s obviously important to this group of residents that came before us. Now it’s up to the town leaders. These situations often come down to the political will of the town.”County Freeholder deputy director and board liaison Lillian G. Burry, echoed a similar sentiment, called for borough leadership to stand with their constituency.“I’d like to see your elected officials support your efforts for this project,” Burry said. “That would carry a lot of weight and could conceivably form a partnership between the town and the county. Things like this have been done before. I encourage their involvement because you have an excellent request and it shouldn’t go for naught.”Borough residents lauded the property as a local point of access to Sandy Hook Bay waters, a boat launch for Catamaran Club members and nonmembers alike, as well as a scenic, walkable expanse with a clear view of nearby Sandy Hook and the stunning New York City skyline.Children and young adults who crafted signs reading “S.O.S. Save Our Shores” spoke of their experiences interacting with wildlife, playing with friends and joining the active sailing community on site, which has helped them develop a skill as well as friendships.James Krauss, Atlantic Highlands Environmental Commission chair, likened this situation to that of the former Giuliani Tract, another selection of waterfront property once located on First Avenue near the borough’s storied harbor, which has since been turned into a parking lot for Seastreak ferry commuters.“Unfortunately we lost that fight, but we don’t want that to happen again to the last piece of undeveloped land on the waterfront. It’s too important,” said Krauss, who pledged the use of environmental commission funds to help the county acquire the seven-acre plot.Though NWP and the board will stand against the development project, time is of the essence, as Borough Administrator Adam Hubeny confirmed that a planning board hearing on the application – submitted by Matawan real estate development company Denholtz Associates – is scheduled for July 12.“We’re going to fight this until the bitter end and take it as far as we can,” said Chiles, who works professionally as a strategic consultant for various conservation organizations. “Right now our goal is to create a path for the county to acquire the property. The timeline is tight, but under the direction of (Monmouth County Park System director) Jim Truncer, the freeholders and this board of commissioners, this process can move quickly if they want it to.”This article first appeared in the June 21 – 28, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Surprise, surprise; B.C. Lions complete Cinderella season by knocking off Winnipeg 34-23 to capture 2011 Grey Cup

first_imgThose fans who tossed the B.C. Lions onto the scrap pile back in July are going get a huge surprise waking up Monday morning after reading the morning website.Because surprise, surprise, the B.C. Lions are 2011 Grey Cup Champions.The Canadian Football League’s Most Outstanding Player, Travis Lulay, tossed consecutive second half touchdown passes to Kierrie Johnson and Arland Bruce sparking the Lions to a 34-23 victory over the Winnipeg Blue Bombers Sunday at B.C. Place in Vancouver.“It’s a championship game. You’ve got to keep the faith and this feels pretty sweet,” Lulay told TSN following the game after struggling before getting the job done.Lulay completed 21 of his 37 passes for 320 yards and two scores.The Lions, winning the sixth championship in franchise history, are the first team in CFL history to start the season with five straight losses and win the Grey Cup.“I told the guys to stay focused,” said Geroy Simon when asked about the 0-5 start.B.C. led 10-0 a field goal by Paul McCallum and touchdown by Andrew Harris.A single point along with a field goal by McCallum increased the lead to 14-0 before Winnipeg kicked two fields goals to make the score 14-6 at the half.The teams exchanged field goals before Lulay & Company went to work as the B.C. quarterback connected with Kierrie Johnson on a 66-yard TD pass.In the fourth quarter after Odell Willis muffed on a potential game-changing interception, the Lions engineered a nine-play 82-yard drive that ended in a six-yard TD pass to Arland Bruce.Winnipeg scored two late touchdowns before McCallum put the game away with a 34-yard field goal. Lulay revealed after the game he was playing with a bad groin injury suffered during the first quarter. The injury slowed Lulay’s ability to run during the game.The Lions win tied head coach Wally Buono with Don Matthews and Hugh Campbell with the most Grey Cup wins at five.B.C. running back Andrew Harris was named the Most Outstanding Canadian in the Grey Cup.There are four teams in CFL history to win a Grey Cup at home. The Lions have done it twice, also capturing the title in 1994.last_img read more